Upcoming|Past


Past Programs



Loco Locovores

The 9th Annual Sprout Exhibition
of New York City Children’s Art

March 9 – May 1, 2016

Opening Celebration
Wednesday, March 9, 2016
4:30pm to 6:30pm

Participating Schools: MS 109K, PS/IS 210, PS 242, Urban Assembly School for New Technologies, and PS 171

Apple Seed Staff: Pam Ito and Ana Orozco









NYMS Lecture Series
NYMS Lecture Series

New York Mycological Society's
Emil Lang Lecture Series

Monday, March 14, 2016
6:00 – 8:00 PM

Fungi in the Cold
Lawrence Millman

Lawrence Millman is the author of 16 books on the Arctic, ethnography, and fungi. His most recent book is Giant Polypores & Stoned Reindeer: Travels in Kingdom Fungi. He has studied fungi in places as diverse as Western Samoa, East Greenland, a meteor crater in northern Quebec, Costa Rica, Panama, and Nantucket. With fellow mycologist Bill Neill, he found a polypore (Echinodontium ballouii) in 2006 previously thought to be extinct. More recently, in Massachusetts, he found a tooth fungus, Radulomyces copelandii, that had never been documented in the New World before. He lives in Cambridge, MA.


Photo: Hygrocybe miniata, Tom Bigelow







NYMS Lecture Series
NYMS Lecture Series

New York Mycological Society's
Emil Lang Lecture Series

Monday, April 11, 2016
6:00 – 8:00 PM

Mycophiles
Eugenia Bone

This illustrated talk shares humorous tales about the people who hunt mushrooms and the festivals and forays they attend all over the United States. Parents bringing kids, please take note: the talk includes candid descriptions of hallucinogenic mushrooms.

Eugenia Bone is a nationally known journalist and author. Her work has appeared in many magazines and newspapers, including Saveur, Food & Wine, Gourmet, The New York Times, and The Denver Post. She is the author of five books. At Mesa's Edge was nominated for a Colorado Book Award. She wrote Italian Family Dining with her father, celebrated chef Edward Giobbi. Well-Preserved was nominated for a James Beard award, and was on many best books lists. Mycophilia: Revelations From the Weird World of Mushrooms was on Amazon's best science books of 2011 list and nominated for a Council on Botanical and Horticultural Libraries award. Her fifth book, The Kitchen Ecosystem (2014) was nominated for the Books for a Better Life Award and on many best cookbook lists that year. Eugenia has lectured widely, in venues like the Denver Botanical Garden and the New York Pubic Library, as well as many mycological and gardening societies across the country, and has appeared on television and radio many times. She is the founder of Slow Food Western Slope in Colorado and the former president of the New York Mycological Society. She writes the blog, http://www.kitchenecosystem.com/.


Photo: Hygrocybe miniata, Tom Bigelow









NYMS Lecture Series
NYMS Lecture Series

New York Mycological Society's
Emil Lang Lecture Series

Monday, February 22
6:00 – 8:00 PM

Mushrooms That Grow On Other Mushrooms
John Plischke III

John Plischke III is a founding member of the Western Pennsylvania Mushroom Club, which has become one of the largest mushroom clubs in the US. He is Walk and Foray Chairman of the WPMC and a member of the Speaker’s Bureau. John has been awarded the club’s Distinguished Service Award.

John is an identifying mushroom expert for the Western PA Mushroom Club (WPMC). He is a life member of NAMA and a trustee to both NAMA and NEMF. NAMA has awarded John the prestigious Harry and Elsie Knighton Award. John is Chairman of the NAMA Photography Committee. He has also presented programs to many NAMA affiliated mushroom clubs.

He is the editor of two WPMC wild mushroom cookbooks. John is also the author of Morel Mushrooms and Their Poisonous Look A Likes and Good Mushroom, Bad Mushroom. He has also contributed to over a dozen other mushroom books. He developed 2 slide programs for NAMA, has made numerous contributions to the NEMF website, and his portfolio includes 10 different mushroom programs.

John has won over 85 national and regional awards for his mushroom photography, is past chairman of the Fungus Section of the PA Biological Survey, has contributed to the mushroom poster available at the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation of Natural Resources, and has given scores of mushroom programs from the East coast to the West coast and across Canada. He can be reached at fungi01@aol.com.


Photo: Hygrocybe miniata, Tom Bigelow






18th Annual International
November 4 - December 30, 2015


Opening Reception
Wednesday, November 4th, 6:00 – 8:00 PM

New York Design Center
200 Lexington Avenue

For more details, please click here.

Image: © 2005 Alexander Viazmensky
Cortinarius sp. (Mushrooms)





Sourdough: A book talk with Sarah Owens
November 7th




 
Sarah Owens

Celebrating global release of her new book Sourdough: Recipes for Rustic Fermented Breads, Sweets, Savories, and More, author Sarah Owens will offer a slide presentation of the botanical contributions included in this beautifully photographed cookbook. Join us in an afternoon of food and wine as the former Brooklyn Botanic Garden Curator reveals her inspiration working as a Rosarian and how it has contributed to her evolution as a seasonally-inspired baker for her micro business BK17 based in Brooklyn, NY and Louisville, KY. Copies will be available for purchase!

Sarah Owens is a professional horticulturist, former steward of the Cranford Rose Collection at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, and the founder of BK17 Bakery, an artisan microbakery specializing in sourdough that serves both New York City and Louisville, KY. Sarah’s customers receive freshly baked goods delivered through a subscription based on seasonally available ingredients and stone-ground heritage grains. She has been featured in Edible Manhattan, on Gardenista, and on 66 Square Feet and has appeared on The Martha Stewart Show.

Book Talk & Tasting
Saturday, November 7th, 3-6pm

UnionDocs
322 Union Ave
Brooklyn, NY

Space is limited, RSVP to scourtade@thehort.org.









Bitterman’s Field Guide to Bitters & Amari
December 9, 2015



Workshop & Booktalk
Wednesay, December 9, 6:30-8:30pm

Darlington Hall
Church of the Heavenly Rest
2 East 90th Street
(entrance on 90th Street)


 
Mark Bitterman

Perfect your “Madmen” cocktail-making skills. Discover how to make your own bitters for classic cocktails like the Manhattan, the Old Fashioned, the “Classic” Martini, and the Sazerac. Join author and culinary expert, Mark Bitterman to make, mix and taste at a hands-on workshop detailing the best practices for creating and enjoying hand-made, bitter-infused cocktails. Everyone will be a mixologist as we create a delicious, signature cocktail and learn the secret to 'Wowing' guests at your next party. Mark will also be signing copies of his new book, Bitterman’s Field Guide to Bitters & Amari, a perfect holiday gift for the Madmen in your life, and the Madwomen! A special workshop offered by the Horticultural Society of New York.

Mark Bitterman is a leading expert on culinary salt, chocolate, and cocktail bitters. His forthcoming book, Bitterman’s Field Guide to Bitters & Amari, is the most comprehensive handbook available on selecting, understanding, mixing, and cooking with bitters, for everyone from professional bartenders and chefs to casual entertainers and home cooks.

Mark has been featured in the New York Times, Splendid Table, Food & Wine, Bizarre Foods, and countless other media. Mark is the owner of the specialty store, The Meadow, with locations in Portland, OR and New York City. The shops carry the largest selection of artisan salt and cocktail bitters in the world, and perhaps the largest curated selection of chocolate bars.


Special Green Family Circle Price
Single: $35
Couple: $60

Hort Member: $50 per person
Non-Member: $70 per person



Find Mark Here
mark@themeadow.com
www.themeadow.com
www.markbitterman.com
Twitter: @selmelier
Instagram: @selmelier
Facebook: Mark Bitterman





Last Look Walkthrough
December 15, 2015


Last Look Walkthrough
Tuesday, December 15
3:00-4:00 pm
New York Design Center
200 Lexington Avenue

Join ASBA and The Hort for refreshments & a last chance exhibition walkthrough at New York Design Center.

Meet curators and artists and enjoy a seasonal cocktail during this reception and walkthrough of our annual exhibition. New York's premier showcase of contemporary botanical art, ASBA's Annual International presents the genre's most established artists alongside emerging talents from around the world.

Artists Carrie Di Costanzo, Ingrid Finnan, and Monika deVries Gohlke will share their personal stories behind their work and offer a unique perspective on the work of their peers. They will be joined by juror Patricia Jonas and curator Carol Woodin who will provide insight into the artwork selection process. Meet curators and artists and enjoy a seasonal cocktail during this reception and walkthrough of our annual exhibition. New York's premier showcase of contemporary botanical art, ASBA's Annual International presents the genre's most established artists alongside emerging talents from around the world.

If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Stephen Courtade at scourtade@thehort.org.







Green Roof Professional (GRP) Training in NYC
September 10 - 12, 2015


The GRP training program provides detailed technical information on green (vegetated) roof design and installation, and prepares individuals for accreditation as a Green Roof Professional. Discover the full range of green roof system types and components, explore implementation issues for new and retrofit buildings, and learn how to integrate green roofs with other building systems for maximum client benefit.

Tuition includes breakfast, lunch, course materials and tours. Members of the Hort can use the discount code TheHortMember to get a $25 discount on each day of training.

This program is approved for continuing education credits by a variety of professional associations including ASLA, AIA, and USGBC.

For more info, and to register, please click here.

Image: Midtown High Rise, New York, NY.
Courtesy of New York Green Roofs and HMWhite





Green Drinks NYC Mixer - Flower Week at The Hort!
Tuesday, May 12, 2015




Join Green Drinks NYC and Eventland for a lively evening of flowers, networking, and celebrating Wildflower Week at The Horticultural Society of New York!

NYC Wildflower Week offers free cultural and educational programming to engage New Yorkers with the wilds of the Big Apple. NYCWW15 is May 9 to 17. Come out and explore the nature near you!

Founded in 2002,Green Drinks NYC is the largest environmental networking organization dedicated to unifying the sustainable community in New York. With over 15,000 members, we host monthly events to engage and connect people from a wide range of backgrounds. Lively networking events are held the second Tuesday of each month. The events are made simple and many come to meet new friends, develop new ideas, discuss issues, solve problems and have moments of serendipity.

6:30pm to 9:30pm
General Admission $15


   





Fun with Flora and Fauna
Children’s Workshop
Thursday, May 7, 2015




Drop in for an afternoon of hands-on activities and eco-crafts that celebrate the wonders of spring. You and your child will learn about beneficial critters, like worms and ladybugs, personalize your own terra cotta pots, and learn how to transplant flowers. Just in time for Mother’s Day, your child can create the perfect gift for the special mothers and grandmothers in their life. Materials provided.

Location: The New York Junior League,
130 East 80th Street, New York, NY 10075
3:30pm to 5:00pm
All ages

Non-Members: One Adult & One Child: $50; Additional Child: $20
Members: One Adult & One Child: $40;
Additional Child: $15

Email programs@thehort.org for more information





Garden Dyes
A Workshop with Blue Red Yellow
Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Natural dyes have been used since 2600 BC and on all over the world. It is the original form of color on fiber and has represented many cultures throughout history. Aside from the historical and more well-known indigo and madder root (turkey red) dyes, there are many other natural substances that are able to be grown and can easily be found in our east coast gardens. This workshop will go over a holistic way to utilize natural dyes on fiber from plants that can be grown in your backyard. It will cover basic washing, mordanting and dyeing techniques. Dye some gardening gloves with us and also takeaway worksheets and knowledge.

BLUEREDYELLOW is a natural dye house started in Philadelphia and run by Elissa Meyers and Mira Adornetto. The business sprouted after receiving a Corzo Center for the Creative Economy grant from The University Arts in which the two are alumni. Aside from teaching workshops, Elissa and Mira currently work on custom dye orders, working with businesses as an alternative dye service to synthetic dyes. They utilize direct sources for plant material and often grow and forage for color. They have been mentioned in several publications including The New York Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer, FastCompany, Flying Kite Magazine and Philadelphia's Grid Magazine.

Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm
Non-members: $40
Members: $30

Email programs@thehort.org for more information






SPRING LECTURE SERIES
with the New York Mycological Society

California Mushrooms: The Book
A Talk with Michael Wood
Friday, April 24, 2015



Join us for a book talk on California Mushrooms: The Comprehensive Identification Guide. Michael Wood will present “Nomenclature & Taxonomy: Why Names Change” and “Morphology & Phylogeny: Why Taxonomy Changes” covering a photographic survey of mushrooms from each of the 30 chapters in the book.

Michael Wood, a California native, is a computer consultant by profession, and a mycologist and photographer by obsession. He is a past president of the Mycological Society of San Francisco and chair of the MSSF systematics committee. He is the publisher and webmaster for MykoWeb and The Fungi of California websites and former webmaster for the MSSF and the North American Mycological Association (NAMA) websites. He has been an avid mushroom collector, photographer, and taxonomist for over 30 years. His mushroom photographs have been published in many scientific journals, plus numerous books, magazines, newspapers, and websites. He has led numerous workshops and countless forays for the MSSF and others. Besides “California Mushrooms”, he is currently collaborating on the forthcoming book “Mushrooms of the Great Smoky Mountains.”

Michael Wood will also lead a foray on April 25 or 26, weather depending.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free


Email programs@thehort.org for more information





Rainbow Carrots and Funky Beets: Gardening with Your Kids
A Demonstration and Talk for Parents
Wednesday, April 22, 2015



Celebrate Earth Day with this fun and informative talk with Chelsey E. Fields, Vegetable Product Manager for W. Atlee Burpee & Co.

Whether the magic of watching a little seed grow into a thriving plant, or feeling the joy of the first harvest, gardening is a wonderful activity for the entire family. Many of the most colorful (and healthy) veggies are very easy to plant and can produce food in even the smallest of spaces. During this get-together you’ll become “veg-ucated” on starting a garden and planting as a family, supported by simple demonstrations on how to get growing!

Location: The New York Junior League,
130 East 80th Street, New York, NY 10075
10:30am to 12:00pm
Light refreshments served

Non-Members: $15; Members: $5

Email programs@thehort.org for more information







SPRING LECTURE SERIES
with the New York Mycological Society

"...nearly always unexpected":
Hunting Mushrooms in the North Woods

A Talk with Tom Bigelow
Wednesday, March 25, 2015



Join us for an illustrated survey of regional mushrooms.

Tom Bigelow is an avid mushroom photographer and has been a member of the New York Mycological Society since 2009.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free


Email programs@thehort.org for more information







Fermentation: International Breads
A Workshop with Cheryl Paswater
Wednesday, March 11, 2015



Fermentation is one of the oldest food processing methods still used today. Scientifically known as zymology, it is the conversion of carbohydrates into alcohols, carbon dioxide, yeast, or bacteria. Beer, miso, kombucha, kefir, kimchi and many other delicious foods we love are the product of fermentation.

In this course we will cover the basic science behind making injera, sourdough, and idlis, why fermented breads are good for you, and how to make them yourself. If you are interested in Old World food preservation, gut health, or fermentation in general, this is the class for you! All participants will sample injera, sourdough, and idlis in class and take home recipes to try at home.

Cheryl Paswater is an artist/teacher/writer and foodie, who after a near-death experience six years ago, turned to holistic doctors for help. After radical diet and lifestyle changes, she started teaching on healthy eating, organic/local/sustainable food, holistic health, and fermentation. She is currently getting certified in Fermentation and has a specific interest in gut health, autoimmune disorders, and healing through fermented foods.

Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm
Non-members: $25
Members: $15

Email programs@thehort.org for more information






Tiny Terrariums
Children's Workshop
Thursday, March 5, 2015



Join us at the New York Junior League for this fun and informative workshop that will inspire your child’s creative side. Together, you and your child will learn all about terrariums, living gardens under glass. Using direct observation, reading, drawing, and planting, your child will learn about this fascinating miniature world, and how to design, create, and care for your little eco-system.

We’ll provide all the materials needed for you and your child to create a tiny terrarium to take home.

Location: The New York Junior League,
130 East 80th Street, New York, NY 10075
3:30pm to 5:00pm
Ages 5 and up

Non-Members: One Adult & One Child: $50; Additional Child: $20
Members: One Adult & One Child: $40; Additional Child: $15

Email programs@thehort.org for more information






SPRING LECTURE SERIES
with the New York Mycological Society

Fungal Interplay in the Palisades Ecosystem
A Talk with Paul Sadowski
Wednesday, February 25, 2015



18,000 years ago, the Palisades were a glaciated, barren rockscape. Today they are home to a thriving ecosystem. How do fungi help in building the biome?

Paul Sadowski is an amateur mycologist long active in the New York Mycological Society and the Northeast Mycological Federation. He frequently leads walktalks in search of fungi. He has tutored groups in the use of the compound microscope in the study of fungi. In 2007-2008 he produced, with Nancy Slovik, Greenbrook Naturalist, a survey of the fungi of Greenbrook Sanctuary in Tenafly, NJ. Members of Greenbrook and the NYMS logged over 1500 collections, revealing the presence of nearly 400 species of fungi. In 2010 he was the recipient of North American Mycological Association’s Harry and Elsie Knighton Service Award.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free


Email programs@thehort.org for more information






Plant-O-Rama
A Trade Show and Symposium for Gardeners and Horticulturists
Tuesday, January 27, 2015




Jumpstart the 2015 Garden Season!

Join the Hort at the 17th Annual
Plant-O-Rama
A Trade Show and Symposium for Gardeners and Horticulturists

Brooklyn Botanic Garden
990 Washington Ave

Metro Hort Group's mid-winter horticultural trade show and symposium annually attracts 800 –1,000 horticulture professionals from the New York City tri-state region to preview plants, products, and services from 50 exhibitors (wholesale growers, specialty nurseries, pottery vendors, soil specialists, etc.) and to hear talks by nationally-recognized nurserymen, landscape architects, garden designers, and authors.

Doug Tallamy speaks on CREATING LIVING LANDSCAPES. Tallamy wrote the best-selling book Bringing Nature Home and co-authored The Living landscape with Rick Darke in 2014.

Ruth Clausen talks about ESSENTIAL NATIVE PERENNIALS. Clausen co-authored Perennials for American Gardens in 1989 and has updated that work with Thomas Christopher in the new book Essential Perennials.

JOBS FAIR — A brand new Plant-O-Rama event where you can check out job and internship opportunities for 2015.





Handcrafted Soaps
A Workshop with George Pisegna
Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Join us for a botanical DIY soap workshop with The Hort’s George Pisegna. Handcrafted soap is perfect for a unique gift or to enjoy in your own home. Learn how to use natural dyes, essential oils, and dried herbs to make soap that looks, smells, and feels wonderful.

Most handmade soap is made from glycerin which is a humectant, meaning it attracts moisture to your skin. When you purchase store-bought soap, the majority of the glycerin has been processed out; however, when you make your own soap, you have the opportunity to create something that is glycerin rich and soft. Join us as we demonstrate the easy to learn melt-and-pour process and create an assortment of beautiful, handcrafted glycerin soaps. We will use a variety of botanicals and organic essential oils; such as tea tree, lavender, rosemary, fir needle, clove, mint, olive oil, and goat's milk.

This workshop covers the basics of glycerin soap making that will allow you to craft your own soaps easily at home. All materials are included, and you will leave with several bars of soaps perfect for holiday gifting!





"Last Look" Artists' Walkthrough
17th Annual International

with the American Society of Botanical Artists
Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Meet the artists and enjoy a seasonal cocktail during this reception and walkthrough of our annual exhibition with the American Society of Botanical Artists (ASBA). New York’s premier showcase of contemporary botanical art, ASBA’s Annual International presents the genre’s most established artists alongside emerging talents from around the world.

Artists Carrie Di Costanzo, Ingrid Finnan, and Monika deVries Gohlke will share their personal stories behind their work and offer a unique perspective on the work of their peers. They will be joined by exhibition juror Patricia Jonas, who will provide insight into the artwork selection process.

This is a great opportunity to see the show before it closes on Wednesday, November 26th.

6:00pm to 8:00pm
FREE for Hort and ASBA members;
$5 for non-members
Email programs@thehort.org for more information





Festive Botanicals
A Family-Friendly Workshop
Thursday, November 20, 2014

Drop in for an afternoon of fall crafting. Together, you and your child will learn about various seasonal botanicals and how to use them in festive decorations and recipes. Just in time for the Holidays, our educators will teach your child how to create a botanical arrangement with gourds, perfect for a Thanksgiving centerpiece, and an edible treat that can be given as a handcrafted gift! We’ll provide all the materials needed for your child to create these festive botanical crafts to take home.

Location: The New York Junior League, 130 East 80th Street, New York, NY 10075
3:30-5:00pm
All ages

Non-Members: One Adult & One Child: $50; Additional Child: $20

Members: One Adult & One Child: $40; Additional Child: $15

Email programs@thehort.org for more information





Fungi, Mushrooms, and Woodland Jewels of the Forest
A Botanical Art Workshop with Margaret Saylor
Monday, November 17, 2014

So much of the mystery and intrigue surrounding fungi stems from the tiny kingdom on the forest floor that they inhabit. Not only does the inclusion of secondary elements such as spiky grasses, brittle leaves, satiny acorns, or even visiting critters interest add to the composition, it also teaches the viewer more about the habitat and world of this particular mushroom the artist has chosen to depict.

Join us for a day of painting at The Hort. Members from the New York Mycological Society will give a brief overview of local mushrooms and fungi. They will supply identified specimens to paint, along with some additional natural items for you to work into your composition. We will take a look at the fungi, and learn more about where it is commonly found. Students will then sketch, compose, and build a unique and accurate painting. Concepts will be taught through demonstrations and lots of individual instruction. All levels of ability are welcome!

Margaret Saylor finds a ton of fungi in her native Berks County, Pennsylvania. Always drawing, she studied painting first with artists from within her own family, and then earned her BFA from Kutztown University in Communications Design. She has been a graphic designer since 1988. Margaret was awarded a certificate, with distinction, in Botanical Art & Illustration from The New York Botanical Garden in June, 2013. She has developed and taught a series of outdoor drawing workshops in conjunction with a local conservancy (made possible by an Artist & Education Grant from ASBA); experimented with watercolor and graphite techniques on vellum, and is currently the Editor/Designer of The Botanical Artist, quarterly journal of the American Society of Botanical Artists. Margaret is a member of ASBA, PSBI, (Philadelphia Society of Botanical Illustrators) and the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. Exhibiting her work in solo and juried shows, Margaret paints in her home studio in Mt. Penn, PA, where she lives with her husband, two teenage boys, a dog, a cat, and many plants. Her painting on vellum, Dryad's Saddle, was accepted into the 17th Annual International at The Horticultural Society of New York.

10am to 5pm (with 1-hour lunch break)
Course fee: Hort members $150; Non-members $190
Click here to view a materials list (PDF)
Email programs@thehort.org for more information





An Introduction to Natural Dyes
A Workshop with Blue Red Yellow
Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Natural dyes have been used since 2600 BC and on all over the world. It is the original form of color on fiber and has represented many cultures throughout history. Indigo and Madder root have been major crops for the colors blue and red on several continents, and continue to be incredibly strong dye materials. Other natural dye colors can be pulled out of a long list of plants and minerals, many of which may be in our own backyards. It hadn't been until the industrial revolution that the use of natural dyes became dominated by synthetic dyes.

This workshop will go over a holistic way to utilize natural dyes on fiber. It will cover basic washing, mordanting and dyeing techniques demonstrated with several different types of plant materials. The primary focus will be on shibori dyeing techniques using a naturally fermenting indigo vat and how to begin and maintain the vat. Leave the workshop with a canvas tote bag, worksheets and samples.

BLUEREDYELLOW is a natural dye house started in Philadelphia and run by Elissa Meyers and Mira Adornetto. The business sprouted after receiving a Corzo Center for the Creative Economy grant from The University Arts in which the two are alumni. Aside from teaching workshops, Elissa and Mira currently work on custom dye orders, working with businesses as an alternative dye service to synthetic dyes. They utilize direct sources for plant material and often grow and forage for color. They have been mentioned in several publications including The New York Times, FastCompany, Flying Kite Magazine and Philadelphia's Grid Magazine.

Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm Members: $15; Non-members: $25
Email programs@thehort.org for more information





Botanicals & Birds
A Botanical Art Workshop Kelly Radding
Monday, October 6, 2014

Birds depicted with botanical subjects enjoy a long historical tradition, from the works of Mark Catesby in the mid-1700's, through John James Audubon in the 1800’s right on up to contemporary works of art. Compositions that include birds tell a broader story of the life of a plant and add a lively element to energize a painting.

In this class, we will explore the relationship between birds, plants and habitats. We will learn techniques for including them in a botanical painting or drawing including determining the correct proportions, how to find and draw the 'perfect' gesture and how to create a dynamic composition.

Kelly Leahy Radding is a wildlife and botanical artist who lives on a farm in the woods. Kelly received a Certificate of Botanical Art and Illustration from The New York Botanical Garden in June of 2002. She has been a graphic designer/illustrator since 1982. Kelly specializes in painting wildlife, botanicals and natural history, developing her style with field observation on location, then translating her natural experiences to paintings in the studio. She paints with watercolors on calfskin vellum, egg tempera & oil on panel, and gouache. Kelly is a member of the Society of Animal Artists, American Society of Botanical Artists (ASBA), the New England Society of Botanical Artists, and the Brooklyn Botanical Garden Florilegium. Kelly is an award winning artist who has exhibited her work in solo, regional group, national and international juried shows including Birds in Art, Society of Animal Artists Annual Exhibitions, the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, the Horticultural Society of New York, BISCOT Scotland, and numerous juried ASBA exhibits.





Fermentation: Kombucha
A Workshop with Cheryl Paswater
Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Fermentation is one of the oldest food processing methods still used today. Scientifically known as zymology, it is the conversion of carbohydrates into alcohols, carbon dioxide, yeast, or bacteria. Beer, miso, sourdough, kefir, kimchi and many other delicious foods we love are the product of fermentation.

In this course we will cover the basic science behind making kombucha, why it’s good for you, and how to make it yourself. If you are interested in Old World food preservation, gut health, or fermentation in general, this is the class for you! All participants will take home a jar of what they make in class.

Cheryl Paswater is an artist/teacher/writer and foodie, who after a near-death experience six years ago, turned to holistic doctors for help. After radical diet and lifestyle changes, she started teaching on healthy eating, organic/local/sustainable food, holistic health, and fermentation. She is currently getting certified in Fermentation and has a specific interest in gut health, autoimmune disorders, and healing through fermented foods.

Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm Members: $15; Non-members: $25
Email programs@thehort.org for more information





Luminous Fruit: Highlights and Reflected Light
A Botanical Art Workshop with Catherine Watters
Friday, September 19, 2014

Capture the glow of fall fruit by balancing highlights, shadows and reflected light to make your subject luminous. Catherine will teach you how to skillfully observe, measure, and draw your subject, followed by careful and accurate color mixing. You are then ready to paint and capture shape, color, and texture using proper lighting to make your painting come to life.

Catherine Watters is an instructor and curriculum developer at Filoli in Woodside, CA. She is a frequent guest instructor throughout the U.S. and in France. Collections include The Hunt Institute, Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Filoli, the Natural History Museum in Paris, the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew and the Isaac Sutton Collection. Catherine’s illustrations have been featured in six books and in Curtis's Botanical Magazine, Horticulture magazine and Flower magazine. She co-founded the Alcatraz Florilegium in San Francisco and the Château de Brécy Florilegium in France. She serves on the Board of Directors of the American Society of Botanical Artists and is a member of the Société Française d'Illustration Botanique.

10am to 5pm (with 1-hour lunch break)
Course fee: Hort members $150; Non-members $190
Click here to view a materials list (PDF) Email programs@thehort.org for more information





Block Print and Stamp Making
A Workshop with Claire Briguglio
Wednesday, May 14, 2014


Join us for a DIY block printing and stamp making workshop with The Hort’s Claire Briguglio. Handmade stamps are great for block printing customized wrapping paper, gift tags, fabric totes, clothing, prints and more. At this workshop, we’ll draw inspiration from the repeating patterns found in the natural world—vines, leaves, flowers, roots, seeds, vegetables, fruits, and more—to carve our own stamps out of soft rubber blocks. We'll conceptualize, design, cut, and test out our stamps on recycled and handmade paper, and you'll take home your newly created stamp so you can create more prints at home.

We’ll provide all the materials needed to create your handmade stamps and several prints on paper; if you have special paper, cards, or other flat printable materials, feel free to bring them to the workshop to try out.

Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm
Members: $20; Non-members: $35;
Email programs@thehort.org for more information

Register





Mushrooms - Unique Natural Dyers
A Lecture and Demo with Susan Hopkins
Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Although mushroom identification is not a simple task, there are three major groups of wild mushrooms that can be recognized for their use as natural dyers. Knowing where and when to look for the best mushrooms helps narrow the field for the beginner as well as the experienced hunter.

Join us for an introduction to various species of wild mushrooms that have been found to contain a rainbow of colors. Using a combination of dried mushrooms, handmade items, digital slides, and books, Susan Hopkins will show the variety of color and share the excitement she has found in using mushrooms for color and demonstrate mushroom dyeing on a small scale.

Susan Hopkins learned to identify fungi as a member of the New Jersey Mycological Association for the last 34 years. She has attended most of the North Eastern Mycological Forays, the annual, regional convention of amateur mushroomers, and several North American Mycological Forays, the annual, national convention of amateur mushroomers. After attending the 1993 International Fungi-Fibre Symposium in Scotland she became a “dyer,” learning the use of various species of wild fungi to dye wool. Even before becoming a “dyer,” her main group of interest to study has been all of the tooth fungi, particularly Hydnellum, Phellodon, Sarcodon and Bankera. Susan now lives in the Adirondack Mountains of NY learning the local fungi flora and continues to do many lectures, walks, and demonstrations on fungi and mushroom dyeing.





Moss Terrarium Workshop - Contained Miniature Landscapes
A Workshop with Twig Terrariums
Wednesday, April 16, 2014




Learn to create a genuine Twig Terrarium while getting hands-on guidance, tips, and tricks to miniscape your little world! With backgrounds in both horticulture and design, Twig founders Michelle Inciarrano and Katy Maslow are experts at creating living sculptures. In this workshop, you’ll learn about several species of moss, how to create and keep a healthy terrarium, and all the factors that go into balancing this mini-ecosystem. We provide all the materials, including the glass, forest fresh moss, and happy little people.

Katy Maslow and Michelle Inciarrano own the Brooklyn-based company Twig Terrariums, through which they run popular terrarium workshops and sell DIY kits, custom creations, and finished terrariums that ship nationwide. Their creations have been featured in the New York Times, Real Simple, and Country Living, and their book, Tiny World Terrariums, was recently featured in Better Homes & Gardens DIY Issue!



Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm

Members: $50; Non-members: $70
Email programs@thehort.org for more information





Quiet New York
An Illustrated Talk and Book Signing with Siobhan Wall
Wednesday, April 9, 2014



It’s the city that never sleeps – crowded and cacophonous, creative and complex. But within New York’s skyscraper canyons and bustling boroughs there are surprisingly quiet places – unknown to many natives and virtually unimaginable to most visitors. Quiet New York is a guide to that other, hidden city where tired tourists can enjoy enticing small museums and peaceful gardens, and harried natives can discover places to relax and recuperate – places of sanctuary and worship, eclectic shops and cafes, libraries, galleries, and waterfront parks. Profiling over 120 quiet places and covering all five boroughs, with evocative photographs and a short description for each location (including travel, access and contact details) Quiet New York reveals the tranquil corners of the world's most stimulating city.

Siobhan Wall has been writing books about quiet places since around 2009, when she published her black and white photobook Quiet Amsterdam. Researching and distributing her book entirely by bicycle, she wanted to tell other people about the beautiful, inspiring locations she had discovered in her adopted city. Following the sell-out success of the Amsterdam title, she found a UK publisher for the next three books in the 'quiet' series - London, Paris and New York. When she isn't traveling around the world shooting photos, she is usually in her studio doing figurative drawings or walking in the dunes overlooking the North Sea. She loves cooking and trying out new recipes with unusual, rare vegetables.



Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm

Free and open to the public
RSVP to programs@thehort.org





Green Drinks NYC Mixer - Food, Flowers, and Farming
Tuesday, April 8, 2014



Join us for a great night of Food, Flowers, and Farming at The Hort with Green Drinks! Founded in 2002, Green Drinks NYC is the largest environmental networking organization dedicated to unifying the sustainable community in New York. With over 15,000 members, Green Drinks hosts monthly events to engage and connect people from a wide range of backgrounds. Lively networking events are held the second Tuesday of each month. The events are made simple and many come to meet new friends, develop new ideas, discuss issues, solve problems, and have moments of serendipity.


6:30pm to 9:30pm
$15

Register with Green Drinks online





SPRING LECTURE SERIES
with the New York Mycological Society

Mycological Travels in Panama
A Talk with Lawrence Millman
Friday, April 4, 2014



In Lawrence Millman's account of his fungal wanderings through the subtropical rainforests of Panama, you'll learn that there's a far greater variety of polypores in this Central American country than in the log-rich Pacific Northwest. You'll also learn that Panama is a mycological terra incognita compared to its neighbor Costa Rica or even compared to other Central American countries. To what rare, undescribed, or just plain weird fungal species will Dr. Millman introduce you? Come find out.

Lawrence Millman, author-mycologist, has written 15 books, including Last Places, A Kayak Full of Ghosts, An Evening Among Headhunters, Lost in the Arctic, Fascinating Fungi of New England, and most recently, Giant Polypores & Stoned Reindeer. In addition to making over 40 trips to the Arctic and Subarctic, Millman has done fungal inventories in places as diverse as Honduras, East Greenland, Nantucket, and a meteorite crater in northern Quebec. In 2006, he and fellow mycologist Bill Neill found a polypore, Echinodontium ballouii, previously thought to be extinct. He keeps a PO box in Cambridge, MA.

Dr. Millman will also lead a walk at 11am on Sunday, April 6th at Inwood Hill Park. Please visit newyorkmyc.org for more information. The walk is free; no RSVP required.



Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to programs@thehort.org





The Hort’s Annual Book and Terrarium Sale
Wednesday, March 19, 2014




Let us help you chase these winter blues away! We’re having a vintage book and terrarium sale, and you’re invited! Browse through or wonderful collection of books and bring home your very own garden under glass. From kitchen gardens to landscape design, herbs to bulbs, we’ll have books for sale on every topic you’ve ever wanted to learn more about. Find a wide variety of horticulture and garden guides, reference books, histories, biographies, and more to add to your library.

Along with picking up some great books, you will have the opportunity to purchase a beautiful terrarium, or two, to brighten up your apartment. With minimal care you can have your own miniature environment in glass. Terrariums also make perfect gifts or party favors! And to brighten up your day even more, we will be serving herbal cocktails all evening to welcome in the spring equinox!


4pm to 8pm

FREE
No RSVP required





Handcrafted Soaps
A Workshop with George Pisegna
Thursday, March 20, 2014




Join us for a botanical DIY soap workshop with The Hort’s George Pisegna. Handcrafted soap is perfect for a unique gift or to enjoy in your own home. Learn how to use natural dyes, essential oils, and dried herbs to make soap that looks, smells, and feels wonderful.

Most handmade soap is made from glycerin which is a humectant, meaning it attracts moisture to your skin. When you purchase store-bought soap, the majority of the glycerin has been processed out; however, when you make your own soap, you have the opportunity to create something that is glycerin rich and soft. Join us as we demonstrate the easy to learn melt-and-pour process and create an assortment of beautiful, handcrafted glycerin soaps. We will use a variety of botanicals and organic essential oils; such as tea tree, lavender, rosemary, fir needle, clove, mint, olive oil, and goat's milk.

This workshop covers the basics of glycerin soap making that will allow you to craft your own soaps easily at home. All materials are included.





Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm

Members: $15; Non-members: $25;
Register online

Email programs@thehort.org for more information





SPRING LECTURE SERIES
with the New York Mycological Society

Tales from the Mushroom Trail
A Book Talk with Langdon Cook
Wednesday, March 5, 2014



Langdon Cook, author of the award-winning book The Mushroom Hunters: On the Trail of an Underground America, will present a slideshow talk of his experiences with commercial fungi harvesters. Follow the supply chain of pickers, buyers, and chefs from patch to plate—and make stops along the way at such famous hunting grounds as the North Coast of California for winter mushrooms, matsutake camps in the Oregon Cascades, Washington's wild and woolly Olympic Peninsula, and even the far-flung morel bonanzas of Yukon Territory. Commercial mushroom harvesting is the biggest (legal) all-cash business in North America, with echoes of the Gold Rush and frontier-style capitalism of yore. Find out how those delicious golden chanterelles, porcini, and truffles wind up at your favorite restaurant.

Langdon Cook is a writer, instructor, and lecturer on wild foods and the outdoors. His books include The Mushroom Hunters: On the Trail of an Underground America which The Wall Street Journal described as a “rollicking narrative…delivering vivid and cinematic scenes on every page,” and Fat of the Land: Adventures of a 21st Century Forager, called “lyrical, practical and quixotic” by the Seattle Times. His writing has appeared in numerous publications, including Fungi Magazine, Terrain, Gray’s Sporting Journal, and Outside, and he has been profiled in Bon Appetit, Salon.com, and the PBS TV series Food Forward. Cook lives in Seattle with his wife and two children.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to programs@thehort.org




Bring Out Your Inner Florist
A Workshop with Rachel Cho
Thursday, March 6, 2014



Have you ever wanted to create your own stylish flower composition? Then come bring out your inner-artist and learn the basics of flower arrangement from Upper West Side florist Rachel Cho! Rachel will help you create your very own low-and-lush composition, and will cover everything from standard flower cleaning to the art of arrangement itself. Learn how to properly cut stems and leaf-line your vases; understand how to size an arrangement, and discover which flowers complement each other best and why. You will leave this class a confident floral designer, with a beautiful take-home arrangement to boot!

A New York favorite, second-generation floral designer Rachel Cho is renowned for her dexterity, innate artistry, and entrepreneurialism. Having graduated with a degree in biology from Smith College, she left the sciences to enter the creative world, going back to her roots and into her mother’s flower shop where she grew up as a little girl. Today, Rachel Cho Floral Design is one of the most sought-after floral design companies in NY, with clients that include MoMA, the luxury areas of Yankee Stadium, the Bronx Zoo, and various fashion houses and venues.


Doors open at 6pm workshop starts at 6:30pm

Contributing Level Members: Free
RSVP to programs@thehort.org

Supporting Level Members: $75
Non-Members: $115
Become a member of The Hort

For more information contact programs@thehort.org




Fermentation: Miso with Cheryl Paswater
Wednesday, February 26, 2014




Fermentation is one of the oldest food processing methods still used today. Scientifically known as zymology, it is the conversion of carbohydrates into alcohols, carbon dioxide, yeast, or bacteria. Beer, miso, sourdough, kefir, kimchi and many other delicious foods we love are the product of fermentation.

In this course we will cover the basic science behind making miso, why it’s good for you, and how to make it yourself. If you are interested in Old World food preservation, gut health, or fermentation in general, this is the class for you! All participants will take home a jar of what they make in class.

Cheryl Paswater is an artist/teacher/writer and foodie, who after a near-death experience six years ago, turned to holistic doctors for help. After radical diet and lifestyle changes, she started teaching on healthy eating, organic/local/sustainable food, holistic health and fermentation. She is currently getting certified in Fermentation and has a specific interest in gut health, autoimmune disorders and healing through fermented foods.


Doors open at 6pm workshop starts at 6:30pm

Members: $15; Non-members: $25;
Register online

Email programs@thehort.org for more information






SPRING LECTURE SERIES
with the New York Mycological Society

Mushrooms and Plants: Connecting the Dots
A Talk with Gary Lincoff
Wednesday, February 5, 2014



Except as causes of decay and disease, nobody until fairly recently, not even as astute a botanist as Charles Darwin, suspected the essential positive interconnections between plants and mushrooms. In this illustrated talk, we will examine some of our common park and woodland plants and the mushrooms we find that make them tick.

Gary Lincoff is the author of The Complete Mushroom Hunter, and the author, co-author, or editor of several books and articles on mushrooms, including The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms. He teaches courses on mushroom and plant identification and use at the New York Botanical Garden and has led wild mushroom and edible wild plant study trips and forays to 30 countries across Asia, Africa, Europe, and South, Central, and North America. Lincoff chaired the Telluride Mushroom Festival for 25 years (1980–2004), and still participates as its principal speaker. He is also a featured “myco visionary” in the award-winning documentary, Know Your Mushrooms, by Ron Mann. Lincoff founded and led the New York City Edible Wild Plant Workshop, which featured a once-a-week wild edibles dinner plus a weekend hunt for edible wild plants and mushrooms in city parks. Patricia Wells published his edible wild plant recipes in an article in the New York Times, and he has been profiled in the Village Voice and New York magazine. He lives in New York City.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to programs@thehort.org




Art21 presents
New York Close Up: Daniel Gordon Gets Physical
A Screening & Conversation with Daniel Gordon
Wednesday, January 29, 2014




In conjunction with Shadows and Pears, The Hort presents a screening of Daniel Gordon Gets Physical, a short video produced by Art21 for their new series, New York Close Up.  The film offers a behind-the-scenes examination of Gordon’s process, focusing on two recent works, one of which is currently on view at The Hort.  Following the screening, the exhibition’s curator, Chris Murtha, and writer Claire Barliant will join the artist for a conversation about his work and attraction to the still life genre.

Art21's New York Close Up series is devoted to artists in the first decade of their professional career, living and working in New York City. This innovative project is acollaboration between Art21 and local artists to imagine new ways of telling stories about their creative process, political and aesthetic philosophies, personal backgrounds, and community perspectives.

Daniel Gordon is a Brooklyn-based artist.  Gordon holds a Bachelor of Arts from Bard College (2004) and an MFA from Yale School of Art (2006). He has had recent solo exhibitions at Wallspace in New York and M + B in Los Angeles. In 2009, he was included in the New Photography exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and in 2010, his work was featured in Greater New York at MoMA PS1. Gordon was recently appointed a Critic in Photography at Yale.

Claire Barliant is a freelance writer, curator, adjunct professor, and part-time editor who lives in Brooklyn. She has taught or been a visiting critic at NYU, the New School, SUNY Purchase, RISD, and Yale School of Art, and her writing has appeared in Art in America, the New Yorker, and others. She is curatorial advisor to EFA Project Space.

Chris Murtha is The Hort's Director of Exhibitions.


Doors open at 6pm; screening starts at 6:30pm

FREE
RSVP to programs@thehort.org

Learn more about this exhibition

Images: Production stills from the New York Close Up film Daniel Gordon Gets Physical. © Art21, Inc. 2013; Installation view of Daniel Gordon, Shadows and Pears, The Horticultural Society of New York.







Plant-O-Rama
A Trade Show and Symposium for Gardeners and Horticulturists
Tuesday, January 28, 2014




Jumpstart the 2013 Garden Season!

Join the Hort at the 17th Annual
Plant-O-Rama
A Trade Show and Symposium for Gardeners and Horticulturists

Brooklyn Botanic Garden
990 Washington Ave

Metro Hort Group's mid-winter horticultural trade show and symposium annually attracts 800 –1,000 horticulture professionals from the New York City tri-state region to preview plants, products, and services from 50 exhibitors (wholesale growers, specialty nurseries, pottery vendors, soil specialists, etc.) and to hear talks by nationally-recognized nurserymen, landscape architects, garden designers, and authors.

This year we are proud to be selling seeds from Hudson Valley Seed Library. Stop by and stock up for seed starting season!

Registration required
To register and for more information visit: brownpapertickets.com







Fermentation: Sauerkraut & Veggies with Cheryl Paswater
Wednesday, January 22, 2014




Fermentation is one of the oldest food processing methods still used today. Scientifically known as zymology, it is the conversion of carbohydrates into alcohols, carbon dioxide, yeast, or bacteria. Beer, miso, sourdough, kefir, kimchi and many other delicious foods we love are the product of fermentation.

In this course we will cover the basic science behind making fermented probiotic-rich vegetables, why they are good for you and how to make them yourself. If you are interested in Old World food preservation, gut health or fermentation in general this is the class for you! All participants will take home a jar of what they make in class.

Cheryl Paswater is an artist/teacher/writer and foodie, who after a near-death experience six years ago, turned to holistic doctors for help. After radical diet and lifestyle changes, she started teaching on healthy eating, organic/local/sustainable food, holistic health and fermentation. She is currently getting certified in Fermentation and has a specific interest in gut health, autoimmune disorders and healing through fermented foods.

THIS WORKSHOP IS SOLD OUT
Email programs@thehort.org to be added to a wait list






CRAFT NIGHT: Photographic Collage
A Workshop with Allegra Denton
Wednesday, December 18, 2013




The art of collage has proved its versatility and appeal to both serious artists and hobbyists alike for centuries. From the politically-charged, newspaper clipping and photomontage work by Alexander Rodchenko in the 1910s, to the doodle-infused marker and photo illustrations that cover the pages of Tavi Gevinson's Rookie Mag today, photographic collage has helped shape international cultures of fashion, art, and style.

In this first-ever CRAFT NIGHT at The Hort, Allegra Denton will give a brief talk that will explore the history of photographic collage and its many uses and techniques popular today. Allegra will begin by demonstrating methods of creating collages using photographic images as a central focus. Then, you will be provided a mountain of horticulture-themed source material and try your hand at the ever-evolving practice of collage.

Using the concurrent exhibition, Daniel Gordon: Shadows and Pears as inspiration, we will use recycled horticultural books and magazines from The Hort's library collection as our main source material. Each participant will be given a flat surface on which to collage, but bringing your own materials is also encouraged.

Allegra Denton received a Bachelor of Fine Art from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and a Master of Art from the City College of New York, CUNY. She is The Hort’s designer and web developer.

Libations & materials provided


Doors open at 6pm workshop starts at 6:30pm

Images top to bottom: Allegra Denton, detail from Glaciers, 2010; Minna, Untitled illustration for RookieMag.com, 2013; Alexander Rodchenko, Untitled Illustration from Vladimir Mayakovsky’s “Pro Eto.”, 1923.







Handcrafted Soaps
A Workshop with George Pisegna
Wednesday, December 11, 2013




Join us for a botanical DIY soap workshop with The Hort’s George Pisegna. Handcrafted soap is perfect for a unique holiday gift or to enjoy in your own home. Learn how to use natural dyes, essential oils, and dried herbs to make soap that looks, smells, and feels wonderful.

The soap making can be simple or complex. Most handmade soap is made from glycerin which is a humectant, meaning it attracts moisture to your skin. When you purchase store-bought soap, the majority of the glycerin has been processed out. Therefore, when you make your own soap, you have the opportunity to create something that is glycerin rich and soft. Join us as we demonstrate the melt and pour process and create an assortment of beautiful, handcrafted glycerin soaps. We will use botanicals and organic essential oils; such as tea tree, lavender, rosemary, fir needle, clove, mint, olive oil, and goat's milk.

This workshop covers the basics of glycerin soap making that will allow you to craft your own soaps easily at home. Handmade soaps make wonderful gifts for any season that all will appreciated by everyone. All materials are included.

Registration required.
Doors open at 6pm workshop starts at 6:30pm







“Last Look” Walkthrough and Closing Reception
16th Annual International
Wednesday, November 20, 2013



See this stunning exhibition of exquisitely rendered botanicals from a variety of perspectives during this conversational walkthrough and reception with exhibition jurors, artists, and curators. This is a great opportunity to see the show in an intimate and knowledgeable setting before it closes on Friday, November 22nd.

This annual botanical art exhibition presents work from the most important artists in the field, both established and emerging. Selected from a field of 200 submissions, the forty-five paintings, drawings, and prints on view have been created by artists from the US, UK, Japan, Australia, Brazil, Canada, and Italy.

On the walkthrough, you’ll hear from juror Patricia Jonas on the qualities of an award-winning work of


art as well as from participating artists, including Best in Show winner Ingrid Finnan, on their own creative processes. Finally, curators Carol Woodin and Chris Murtha will discuss collecting and presenting botanical art.

6:00pm to 8:00pm
Free and open to the public






Artisanal Breadmaking
A two-part DIY workshop on hand crafted breads
with Sarah Owens of BK17 Bakery

November 11 & 20, 2013



Bread has been a staple in the American diet for hundreds of years but the art of bread making has been lost to the convenience of buying sliced and often highly processed loaves at the store. Learn how easy it is to enjoy the unmatchable taste of homemade bread with this two-part workshop. Once you know how to make your own bread you can experiment with all kinds of botanical additives – such as herbs, flowers, and dried fruits.

First Session: Intro to Sourdough
Sarah Owens, Rosarian and owner of BK17 Bakery will guide you through the steps to creating and keeping your own sourdough starter. The process of using wild yeast to leaven breads, pancakes, and other baked goods will be demystified and you will leave with your own culture to take home! The class will include a short lecture, lessons on feeding your starter, basic recipes, as well as a demo on how to make buckwheat pancakes. Class time: 2 hours

Second Session: Baking with Sourdough
In this class, you will create your own bread dough to bake at home! The fundamentals of mixing, kneading, and baking will be covered. Bring your refreshed starter with you and we will provide a proofing basket as well as several recipes for beginners to become more familiar with the process of baking with sourdough. Class time 2 hours.

Doors open at 6:00pm;
Workshop starts at 6:30pm
Hort Members $60; non-members $75
Email programs@thehort.org for more information



All photographs courtesy Marie Viljoen





Year-End Celebration
Wednesday, November 13, 2013



Join us as we celebrate another incredible year
at The Hort!

In the past year, we helped green New York City by opening six new school gardens, building a rooftop garden for the Waldorf Astoria, adding a cut-flower field to our GreenHouse program on Rikers Island, and launching the Neighborhood Plaza Partnership in collaboration with ACE. We also inspired New Yorkers with an exhibition on green infrastructure and our largest Urban Agriculture Conference to date.

Special guests Michelle Inciarrano & Katy Maslow of Brooklyn’s Twig Terrariums will demonstrate how to build a simple terrarium and what it takes to maintain a happy and healthy little green world. After the demo, stay to enjoy our annual botanical art exhibition along with cocktails made with Mahia from Nahmias et Fils, music, and snacks.

Everyone will receive a raffle ticket with admission for a chance to win one of the terrariums made throughout the night!

Twig Terrariums is a verdant venture sprung from the minds of two old friends, Michelle Inciarrano and Katy Maslow. Located in Brooklyn, New York, Twig began on a whim - Michelle, a lifelong plant nerd, convinced Katy, a skeptical poet, to gather some mosses and repurpose a cruet jar from her kitchen cabinet. What happened from there is a devotion and obsession that has yet to quit. Twig is about perspective and perception, creating lush backdrops for whimsical, ironic, and natural scenes

Mahia is distilled from figs according to the old traditions of Morocco. As a result of centuries of experience, figs are carefully selected before going through fermentation and distillation.

Hort Members: Free Admission (includes 1 raffle ticket)
RSVP to programs@thehort.org

Non-Members: $5 (includes 1 raffle ticket)

Business Meeting | 5:30 pm
Members and Board Members only

Celebration | 6:00 pm









Autumn Branches and Leaves
A Botanical Art Workshop with Beverly Duncan
Friday, November 15, 2013



Living in western Massachusetts, Beverly Duncan began her career as a botanical artist inspired by both the natural world surrounding her and by what she cultivates in her vegetable, fruit, and flower gardens throughout the seasons. Join this award-winning botanical artist in a one-day workshop studying and painting autumn material, specifically leaves and branches.

In this class Beverly will share her excitement of the natural world at this time of year, when she finds so much color and form in late autumn foliage and in the bare branches of the trees and shrubs around us. After a brief introduction, students will draw their chosen subject, transfer the drawing to watercolor paper, and then begin painting the subject. Beginning students will come away with valuable hands-on experience and an understanding of the botanical art process while more advanced students will enjoy working with the distinctive subject matter.

Beverly Duncan has received numerous awards for her paintings, including the first ever “Best of Show” at the annual ASBA exhibition at the Horticultural Society of New York. Her work is found in private and corporate collections in the U.S. and abroad. Beverly also illustrates for numerous books and publications.

Beverly has two paintings that focus on winter branches in The 16th Annual International, which is on view from September 20 – November 22, 2013.

Morning session: 10:00am to 1:00pm
Afternoon session: 2:00pm to 5:00pm
Course fee (for both sessions): Hort members $160; Non-members $200
Click here to view a materials list (PDF)







Juanli Carrión’s Outer Seed Shadow #01
Public Launch Party and Presentation
Thursday, October 24



You're cordially invited to the offical launch party for Juanli Carrión's Outer Seed Shadow #01, to be held at The Horticultural Society of New York on October 24th, from 6:00pm to 9:00pm.

Outer Seed Shadow #01 is a project by artist Juanli Carrión in conjunction with the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation that will take the form of a public art installation in May 2014. Over the past year Carrión has been carrying out interviews with immigrants living across Manhattan, allowing them to tell their stories of arrival in their own words as well as symbolically in the form of plants they’ve selected to best represent themselves and their countries of origin. With the great variety of plants derived from dozens of interviews, the artist is creating a 4,000 sq. ft. interactive community garden in the shape of Manhattan, to be installed in SoHo’s Duarte Square.

Carrión will give a brief presentation of Outer Seed Shadow #01 with project collaborators, including Thomas Kosbau, Founder and Principle of ORE Design + Technology, Amie Uhrynowski, Art Commission Liaison of NYC Dept. of Parks & Recreation, and George Pisegna, Director of Horticulture and Public Programs at The Hort, who will assist the artist on the challenge of landscaping the garden.

6:00 pm to 9:00pm
Free and open to the public
RSVP to project@outerseedshadow.org

For more information about Juanli Carrión's
Outer Seed Shadow #01 visit outerseedshadow.org







Succulent Terrariums:
A Workshop with George Pisegna
Wednesday, October 23, 2013




Discover one of the simplest yet most dynamic ways to bring the garden indoors. Whether you’re a novice or a seasoned gardener you can find terrarium that is right for you. Coming in many shapes, sizes, and forms, terrariums can house a wide variety of plants and can be found in the most unexpected of places. Learn how you can re-purpose anything from an empty container to light bulb into a tiny living world that everyone can enjoy.

After a short lecture, George will give a hands-on demonstration through the steps of making your very own open-air succulent terrarium.
We will provide all materials you need to create your terrarium project. Be sure to bring something carry your finished terrarium home with

George Pisegna is the Director of Horticulture and Public Programs at The Hort. He is a landscape designer and horticulturist with a background in architecture and design and has worked for nearly 20 years in historic preservation and garden design. Mr. Pisegna has designed and installed private gardens throughout the Northeast with special consideration to native plantings.

Note: classes must be paid in full at the time of registration. Cancellations must be made within 5 business days of workshop for refund.

Doors open at 6:00pm;
Workshop starts at 6:30pm
email programs@thehort.org for more information








Petals and Pistils
A 3-Day Botanical Art Workshop with John Pastoriza-Piñol
October 16–18, 2013



Australian artist John Pastoriza-Piñol’s work is defined by rich luminous hues and gorgeously exotic and rare botanical specimens. John is a realist artist whose practice operates between the centuries-old tradition of botanical illustration and contemporary art. His perfectly executed watercolors, which display the accuracy that is vital to botanical illustration, also possess a fluidity and sensuality that stirs the viewer to experience more than a mere marveling
of technique.

Over 3 days, John will assist you with painting your floral subject, advising on composition, painting techniques, and color theory. Students will learn the intricacies of achieving fine detail with watercolor masking fluid and a comb brush, invaluable tools for contemporary botanical artists. As a result, your paintings will be brought to a new level of realism and detail.

Please note: this class is suitable for artists of all levels, from beginners to professionals.

John Pastoriza-Piñol received a doctorate in botany from University of Vigo, Spain. His work is in numerous public and private collections around the world, including: Hunt Institute; Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; State Collection at Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne; RMIT University; and the Collection of Alisa and Isaac M. Sutton.  He is the recipient of many awards and recognitions, including a commission for the Highgrove Florilegium through the Prince of Wales’s Charitable Foundation.  Pastoriza-Piñol currently teaches at the Geelong Botanic Gardens and is represented by Nellie Castan Gallery in South Yarra.

John’s painting of Pomegranate (Punica granatum) is featured in The 16th Annual International, which is on view from September 20 – November 22, 2013.

10am to 5pm (with 1-hour lunch break)
Course fee: Hort members $360; Non-members $425
Click here to view a materials list (PDF)







Seasonal Pickling:
A Workshop with Shamus Jones of Brooklyn Brine
Thursday, October 3, 2013




Want to out pickle your friends? Take this DIY workshop with the pickle masters of Brooklyn Brine! Learn the full spectrum of pickling from the acidified thermal process, refrigerated quick pickles, and fermentation. Shamus Jones will answer all your questions about trouble shooting pickling at home, recipe ideas, and ways to capture the seasons produce.

This is a hands-on workshop and you’ll take home 2 jars special Hort pickles that you make in class.
Brooklyn Brine is a 4 year old artisan pickle company in Brooklyn NY. Started from a passion of culinary artistry working out of a borrowed restaurant kitchen from 10pm-8am for the first 10 months, to a full on dedicated factory in Gowanus, we have blossomed into our nation's leader for awesome, handcrafted pickles. Shamus Jones, executive briner, is a native New Yorker who's lifelong passion of all things DIY has come to fruition.


Doors open at 6:00pm;
Workshop starts at 6:30pm
Hort Members $25; non-members $40
Please email programs@thehort.org for more information








Capturing Nature's Color
A Botanical Art Workshop with Asuka Hishiki
Monday, September 30, 2013



A tomato is red and a broccoli is green, right? But what kind of red or green are they? A fully ripe summer tomato can be beautifully red, and your instinct may be to paint it with cadmium red. Actually, the real tomato color consists of a more complicated mixture.

It’s never easy to capture the genuine color of your subject, but a little bit of color logic and calculation will help you achieve more accurate color in your botanical painting. In this class you will explore the world of color theory and learn how to apply it to your painting.

Asuka Hishiki holds a Master of Fine Arts from Kyoto City University of Arts in Japan where she studied oil painting. Plants and nature are always her inspiration. She is a self-taught botanical artist. Her work has been shown in many international exhibitions, including the 14th International Exhibition of Botanical Art & Illustration at Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation in Pennsylvania, USA.

Hishiki has two paintings, Brassica oleracea (Giant Kohlrabi) and Cucurbita maxim (Turban Squash), featured in The 16th Annual International, which is on view from September 20 – November 22.

Morning Session: 10:00am to 1:00pm
Afternoon Session: 2:00pm to 5:00pm

Course fee (for both sessions): Hort members $160; Non-members $200
Click here to view a materials list (PDF)







The Hort celebrates summer with Wilder Quarterly
on The Waterfront Museum

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Join The Hort and Wilder Quarterly  on The Waterfront Museum when it docks for a special evening in Brooklyn Bridge Park. We will celebrate summer with a fun and educational DIY seed-bomb workshop, live music, drinks, and beautiful city views.

Drinks generously provided by Van Brunt Stillhouse.

LOCATION:
Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 6
Click here for directions

6:00pm—Doors open
6:30pm—Seed-Bombs: a history and workshop with Wilder Quarterly
7:15pm-9:00pm—Reception and live music

Seed-Bombs—a History and Workshop

Learn about this history of seed-bombing in New York City while making your own Wilder Quarterly Seed Bomb of non-invasive and all-region suitable wild flower seeds to take home.

Seed Bombs are designed to enable seeds to be sown in hard to reach places or locations where gardeners are unable to spend a lot of time gardening. They came about in 1973—first used by community gardening pioneer, Liz Christy and her group of ‘rebel gardeners.’ The spirit behind ‘rebel gardening’ was to see abandoned lots and other un-used urban spaces for their potential to grow flowers, food, and trees. What started with a few additional flowers scattered through city streets blossomed into the first ever community garden and farm on the Corner of Bowery and Houston Streets.

Today, community gardens have become synonymous with the sustainable food movement. With nearly 500 gardens in New York City alone, it’s hard to walk around some downtown Manhattan streets without bumping into one. Seed bombs too have grown in popularity—even being sold at stores like Anthropologie and Crate & Barrel. Although much has changed since the first green-ades were thrown into vacant lots, the function and intention has mostly stayed the same.

About The Waterfront Museum

The Waterfront Museum provides waterfront access and free/low-cost programs in education and the arts aboard an historic vessel. The Museum is housed afloat the 1914 Lehigh Valley No. 79 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the last and only wooden barge of the “lighterage era” (1860-1960) that is still floating in America. She had been made obsolete by major shifts in the shipping industry in the 1950s. Prior to that period, railroad companies maintained large fleets of barges to bring goods between railroad terminals, across and along the Hudson River for consumer use, and for shipment overseas. As a floating showboat and classroom, hundreds of thousands have come to the waterfront to participate in Museum programs and events.

Thank you to our sponsors:

   
 
 


FREE for Hort and Water Front Museum members
Non-members: $30
Doors open at 6:00pm;
Email
programs@thehort.org for more information.








To Eat:
A Talk with Joe Eck
Monday, June 17, 2013




For years, Joe Eck and Wayne Winterrowd lived and worked together, tending to North Hill, their spectacular garden in southern Vermont, which each year draws visitors from around the world who delight in exploring its seven carefully cultivated acres; and collaborating on books that centered on their passions for plants and animals, and for the soil that nourishes them both. To Eat was, unfortunately, fated to be their last collaboration: they were at work on this book when Winterrowd passed away in 2010.

To Eat is a celebration of their life together, a tribute to the garden they both loved and to the man who spent his life reveling in the fruits—literal and metaphorical—of his labor. As Eck and Winterrowd move through the seasons, considering the edible plants and vegetables appropriate to each, what shines through above all is their connection to the land and to each other. This is a celebration of life and the life cycle, of eating seasonally, of cultivating a meal from the ground up. It’s about abundance and also scarcity; about living in harmony with the world and accepting its offerings.

Informative, funny, and, above all, tenderly moving, To Eat is a fitting capstone to a profound partnership.

Joe Eck and Wayne Winterrowd are the coauthors of Our Life in Gardens, The Year at North Hill: Four Seasons in a Vermont Garden, and Living Seasonally: The Kitchen and the Table at North Hill. They are cofounders of the garden design firm North Hill. Eck lives in Readsboro, Vermont; Winterrowd died in 2010.



Doors open at 6:00pm;
Lecture starts at 6:30pm
Free and open to the public
Email programs@thehort.org to RSVP







Beginner's Guide to Heirloom Vegetables:
A Talk with Marie Iannotti
Tuesday, June 11, 2013




Why did Angela Nardiello sew pepper seeds into the hem of her skirt before setting sail from Italy, bound for America? Heirloom vegetables often have intriguing stories behind them, but in the end it all comes down to the flavors gardeners and cooks couldn't imagine being without. There is so much more to heirloom vegetables than tomatoes. These vegetables have traveled the world, yet you won't find many of them in the produce aisle. From the citrus notes of 'Aunt Molly's' ground cherries to the refreshing bite of 'Rat's Tail' radish, there are thousands of delectable vegetables waiting to be grown and enjoyed. Whatever your taste, there are surprises in store - tangy mouse melons, earthy white eggplants, mellow chestnut squashes. Marie brings us the fascinating stories, but more importantly, she tells us which varieties are the easiest to grow and the tastiest to eat, along with tips on how to cultivate each one successfully. If you've never tasted the meaty and gratifying 'Red Russian' kale or the unexpected sweetness of 'Apollo' arugula — or if you have tasted them and want more — The Beginner's Guide to Growing Heirloom Vegetables will tempt you into the garden.

Marie Iannotti has been growing, writing and talking about gardens since she planted her first radish seeds, as a child. She is the former owner of the heirloom seeding business, Yore Vegetables, where she did a lot of sampling. Her writing and photography has been featured in newspapers and magazines nationwide, and she has been featured on numerous radio shows and podcasts, including Organic Gardening, The Heirloom Gardener, Martha Stewart Radio and National Public Radio. Marie is a longtime master gardener and a former Cornell Cooperative Extension Horticulture Educator. She is the former editor of The Mid-Hudson Gardener's Guide, the current Guide to Gardening for About.com and she writes about her own garden at PracticallyGardening.com. Her next book, on northeast vegetable gardening, as well as the eBook and app, "A Gardener's Tour of the Hudson Valley", will be out later this year.








The Drunken Botanist
A Talk with Amy Stewart
Thursday, June 6, 2013


Sake began with a grain of rice. Scotch emerged from barley, tequila from agave, rum from sugarcane, bourbon from corn. Thirsty yet? In The Drunken Botanist, Amy Stewart explores the dizzying array of herbs, flowers, trees, fruits, and fungi that humans have, through ingenuity, inspiration, and sheer desperation, contrived to transform into alcohol.

Of all the extraordinary and obscure plants that have been fermented and distilled, a few are dangerous, some are downright bizarre, and one is as ancient as dinosaurs--but each represents a unique cultural contribution to our global drinking traditions and our history.

This fascinating concoction of biology, chemistry, history, etymology, and mixology—with more than fifty drink recipes and growing tips for gardeners—will make you the most popular guest at any cocktail party.

Join us for a fun-filled evening as we host Amy Stewart and pour a few choice cocktails to celebrate.

Amy Stewart is the award-winning author of six books on the perils and pleasures of the natural world, including four New York Times bestsellers, The Drunken Botanist, Wicked Bugs, Wicked Plants, and Flower Confidential. She lives in Eureka, California, with her husband Scott Brown. They own an antiquarian bookstore called Eureka Books and tend a flock of unruly hens in their backyard.

Amy has written for the New York Times, the Washington Post, and many other newspapers and magazines. She is the co-founder of the popular blog GardenRant and is a contributing editor at Fine Gardening magazine.








Spicy Sauces and Piquant Powders :
A Cooking Workshop with Jonathan Soma
Wednesday, May 22, 2013




Get ready for the barbeque season by learning how to make hot sauces from peppers you can grow on your own windowsill. The workshop will begin with a tour of hot sauces across the world, starting with Louisiana's Tabasco sauce and ending up with Korean gochujang. After we have a fix on the different kinds of hot sauces and how heat can be balanced with sweetness and flavor, we'll move on to making our own concoctions. We'll uncover the history of sriracha and make a batch of our own version of the fiery Asian condiment, then move on to a more subtle fruit-based hot sauce inspired by Caribbean cuisine. We'll also survey spice blends from the East and West, mixing together a few of our own. Participants will be taking home 2 varieties of homemade hot sauce.

Jonathan Soma founded the Brooklyn Brainery in 2010 to help hobbyists everywhere get a leg up on their passions. He co-hosts the monthly food culture lecture series Masters of Social Gastronomy where he covers the science and culture of everyday foods. A culinary dabbler, Soma also leads classes on everything from Thai cuisine to homemade soda.

Email programs@thehort.org for more information








Why Grow That When You Can Grow This?
A Talk with Andrew Keys
Thursday, May 9, 2013



Much like high school, the garden is a popularity contest, and as gardeners, we tend to be as sentimental about plants as we are about our school days. What to do when the prom queen of yesterday’s garden grows up to be a pampered mess, and a constant source of maintenance? The answer lies in all-star plant problem-solvers. Author Andrew Keys talks about why we go to such lengths to grow problem plants, and counters with new favorites that prove to be sexier and more sustainable in every way.

Andrew Keys is a writer, designer, and lifelong gardener, Garden Confidential podcaster at Fine Gardening, and author of Why Grow That When You Can Grow This?: 255 Extraordinary Alternatives to Everyday Problem Plants (Timber Press). Descended from Mississippi cotton farmers, Andrew was raised with a reverence for the land passed down generations, and first fell in love with plants in the woods of his childhood home. Andrew’s feature articles have appeared in Fine Gardening, he’s written for Leaf Magazine and Coastal Home, and he splits his time between plants and his work as web manager for the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. Andrew is a Northeast Organic Farming Association-accredited organic landcare professional, and his consulting philosophy is centered on sustainable planting.

Doors open at 6:00pm;
Workshop starts at 6:30pm
Free and open to the public






Homemade Sweets:
A Botanical Candies Workshop with Liddabit Sweets
Wednesday, May 1, 2013




Looking for a unique Mother’s Day Gift this year? Show Mom your love with delicious treats and sweets! Learn 3 tasty recipes with Liz and Jen of Liddabit Sweets at this handcrafted candy making workshop. You’ll learn the step-by-step process of making jelly candies, caramels, and botanically infused marshmallows from scratch. After a comprehensive (and drool inducing) demo, you’ll get the chance to finish and package it all yourself! In addition to your handmade treats, you'll also take home a copy of The Liddabit Sweets Candy Cookbook (which Jen and Liz will happily sign during the post-class Q&A and meet-and-greet session) and a copy of the exclusive recipes you made in class.

Liz Gutman originally hails from Costa Mesa, CA. At 17, she hightailed it to New York to get her BFA in acting from NYU. After spending two years at a media research company, she quit in 2007 to begin working for pastry chef Will Goldfarb. She enrolled in the French Culinary Institute (FCI)’s pastry program shortly thereafter. Jen King is from Ann Arbor, MI, and received her BA in Communications from Michigan State University (go Spartans!). She spent three years working for the Democrats and after a couple exhausting campaigns, she decided to turn her passion into a job and put her 2,000+ cookbooks to good use as a culinary professional, and in 2007 moved to New York to attend FCI. The two became fast friends, and were soon sharing pre-class snacks and recipe ideas on a regular basis. Realizing a shared passion for sustainably produced, fresh, superior-quality ingredients and sweets, their talk of starting a business together became a reality in early 2009. After gaining a vendor slot at the famed Brooklyn Flea Market and garnering some early publicity, Liz and Jen are humbled and thrilled to be lucky enough to spend their time sharing their love of sweets with their unbelievably awesome customers.

Doors open at 6:00pm;
Workshop starts at 6:30pm
Hort Members $35; non-members $50
Email programs@thehort.org for more information









The NEW YORK CHAPTER AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS and
THE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY OF NEW YORK present

Currents in Green Infrastructure:
Designs for a Sustainable New York City

April 4–30, 2013



Throughout April, in celebration of Landscape Architecture Month, The Hort and the ASLANY will host the exhibition, Currents in Green Infrastructure, as well as a series of programs to further the discussion of green infrastructure. All events are at The Hort unless otherwise noted.

April 4 – 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Currents in Green Infrastructure
Opening Reception
The exhibition opens with a reception and brief remarks from City leaders and ASLA NY about the importance of this work and the need to celebrate it.

April 8 – 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Panel Discussion: Practical Steps in Designing and Constructing Green Infrastructure Projects
NYC Department of Environmental Protection representatives will present a broad overview of their Green Infrastructure Grant Program. Grant participants will discuss their projects and lessons learned, sharing how others can successfully implement green infrastructure at various scales and locations.

Panelists: Eric Dalski, Highview Creations, on green roofs; Bob Retnauer, RDA Landscape Architecture, on Queens College; Eric Rothstein, eDesign Dynamics, on Poppenhusen Historical Society; Elizabeth Kennedy, EKLA Studio, on Brooklyn Navy Yard; moderated by Margot Walker, DEP.

April 13
39th World Wide Sketchcrawl
with Richard Alomar
10:00 AM   Bethesda Fountain
2:00 PM   Lincoln Center Fountain
Alomar’s “sketchcrawls” foster the art of on-location drawing, which focuses attention on the details, color, structure and spatial relationships of built environments. More than a rendering tool it’s a “seeing” aid.

April 16 – 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Planting Green Infrastructure:
Two Recent Projects at the New York Botanical Garden

Travis Beck, ASLA
Green infrastructure projects provide measurable improvements in water quality. Can they be designed to provide other ecological benefits as well? How do project goals influence plant choices, and how do plant choices influence project outcomes? In 2012 the New York Botanical Garden installed and planted two constructed wetlands. Hear how plants were selected for both projects, early observations of how they are performing, and what this suggests for designing multifunctional green infrastructure. Travis Beck, ASLA, is the Landscape and Gardens Project Manager at the New York Botanical Garden and author of Principles of Ecological Landscape Design.

April 29 – 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Building Green Infrastructure:
A Panel Discussion on Materials in the Landscape
Green infrastructure projects often contain a relatively simple set of materials, yet making sure those materials are selected, installed and maintained so that they function together as  intended requires specialized knowledge. This presentation and panel discussion will focus on some key materials for green infrastructure projects: soils, plants and permeable unit pavers, with emphasis on factors that can make for the success or failure of a green infrastructure project. Specification and installation criteria for appropriate soils, herbaceous and woody plants and pavers that allow for permeability will be discussed, along with critical maintenance issues to keep the system performing optimally.

Panelists: Donald Knezick, Pinelands Nursery and Supply; Andrew Lavalle, ASLA, RLA, CSI, Principal at AECOM Design + Planning; Sean O'Leary, Vice President of Sales + Marketing for Unilock NY, Civil Engineer; Matthew Stephens, Director of Street Tree Planting for the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation; and Nette Compton, RLA, Director of Green Infrastructure, Dept. of Parks and Recreation.  Moderator: Denisha Williams, RLA, LEED AP, Immediate Past President, ASLA-NY.


Programs related to Currents in Green Infrastructure are sponsored by Experienced Bricks







The Olive Route:
A Talk and Olive Oil Tasting with Carol Drinkwater
Wednesday, April 17, 2013




When Carol Drinkwater and her husband purchased a rundown property overlooking the Bay of Cannes, France, they discovered sixty-eight, 400-year-old olive trees. Once the land was reclaimed and the olives gathered and pressed, Carol and Michel became the producers of top quality olive oil, and their farm has since gained an AOC (Appellation d’Origine Controllee).

Join us for a lecture and tasting with actress and olive oil expert Carol Drinkwater. Carol will take us on her journey of discovering the rich history and culture of the olive tree while sharing the story of her solo seventeen-month Mediterranean sojourn in search of the mythical secrets of ancient olive oil production

The lecture will be followed by an olive oil tasting led by olive oil professional taster, teacher, researcher Alexandra Devarenne, and Pure Mountain Olive Oil of Rhinebeck, NY.

Carol Drinkwater is perhaps most familiar to audiences for her award-winning portrayal of Helen Herriot in the BBC series All Creatures Great and Small. A popular and acclaimed author and film-maker as well, Carol has published nineteen books. Her series of memoirs about her experiences (The Olive Farm, The Olive Season, The Olive Harvest, and Return to the Olive Farm) have become best sellers in the U.S. and abroad and her travel books, The Olive Route and The Olive Tree, have inspired a recently completed five-part documentary film series entitled The Olive Route. Carol has also been invited to work with UNESCO to help found an Olive Heritage Trail around the Mediterranean Basin, with the dual goals of creating peace in the region and honoring the ancient heritage of the olive tree.

Doors open at 6:00pm;
lecture begins at 6:30pm
Hort and Garden Conservancy Members $25; non-members $35
Register online or email programs@thehort.org for more information









Bitters, Infusions, and Simple Syrups:
A Custom Cocktail Workshop with Sarah Lohman of Four Pounds Flour
Wednesday, April 10, 2013




Join us as Sarah Lohman teaches us how to recreate those ever-so-delicious cocktails that you thought only a trained “mixologist” could create. Learn how to infuse liquors with herbs and spices using historic recipes as inspiration, and concoct herbal cocktails with flavored simple syrups and fresh ingredients. We'll also discuss how to use cocktail bitters—as well as their fascinating history—and you'll make your own bitters from scratch. Learn how to make your own fresh-flavored, botanically inspired cocktails with a hands-on demo. We’ll enjoy a cocktail in class and you’ll get to take home a sample of your own cocktail bitters.

Sarah Lohman is originally from Cleveland, Ohio, where she graduated with a BFA from the Cleveland Institute of Art in 2005 and for her undergraduate thesis she opened a temporary restaurant/installation that reinterpreted food of the Colonial era for a modern audience. Lohman moved to New York in 2006 to work for New York Magazine’s food blog, Grub Street. Currently, she works with museums and galleries around the city to create public programs focused on food; including the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, apexart gallery, The American Museum of Natural History, 3rd Ward and the Brooklyn Botanical Garden.

Dubbed an “historic gastronomist,” Lohman recreates historic recipes as a way to make a personal connection with the past. Her blog, FourPoundsFlour.com, and her work, have been featured in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. She has appeared on Heritage Radio's We Dig Plants, and is featured in NYC-TV’s mini-series Appetite City cooking culinary treats from New York’s past.

Doors open at 6:00pm;
Workshop starts at 6:30pm
Email programs@thehort.org to be added to the waiting list









Terrarium Workshop
With George Pisegna
Wednesday, March 13, 2013




Whether you’re a novice or a seasoned gardener, join us at The Hort and discover one of the simplest ways to garden. George Pisegna, our Director of Horticulture, will share his secrets on how to create a wonderful garden under glass. Terrariums come in many shapes and sizes, from simple wine glasses to elaborate Wardian cases. Since space is a luxury to most city-dwellers, a terrarium is a perfect way to bring your favorite plants into your home. 

After a short lecture, George will help you create your own magical terrarium with simple step-by-step instructions on choosing your materials, designing, and planting your garden under glass. We will provide everything you need to create your terrarium project. Be sure to bring something with you to carry your finished terrarium home

Doors open at 6:00pm;
Workshop starts at 6:30pm
Email programs@thehort.org for more information or to be placed on the waiting list


Note: classes must be paid in full at the time of registration. Cancellations must be made within 5 business days of workshop for refund.









Affinage, the Sophisticated Art of Aging Cheese
A Cheese Workshop with Christopher Killoran of Stinky Bklyn
Thursday, February 21, 2013




Making cheese from milk is, on paper, a simple process. The true art of cheese making that only comes through when you taste a perfect slice of well aged cheese, happens in dark cellars and spotless aging caves. It is the art of aging a young cheese and turning it into everything it was destined to be. Equal parts science and art, Affinage is the process of washing, innoculating, and injecting, young cheeses with the molds, bacterias, cultures, and enzymes that will allow that cheese to reach maturity and become 'delicious'. The job of the Affinuer is to wake the cheese up, to bring that living curdy goodness back to what it was, and ripen young cheeses to maturity. It’s a pungent job but someone has to do it. Join us as we not only discuss this whole process, but also taste cheeses and learn how to use, serve, and enjoy them.

Stinky Bklyn was founded in 2006 by Patrick Watson and Michele Pravda who also own Smith & Vine, The JakeWalk and Brooklyn Wine Exchange. Since its creation, Stinky Bklyn has launched itself into the world of Artisanal Cheeses and craft foods carefully curating the best of what our city, state and globe has to offer. With a strong emphasis on European cheeses, Stinky also beholds one of the finest selections of products made right here in Brooklyn. With a dedication to education and hospitality, Stinky Bklyn today is considered one of the best cheese shops on the east coast with a national awareness of its efforts.

Doors open at 6:00pm, workshop starts 6:30pm
Hort members: $35; non-members: $50
Register online or email programs@thehort.org for more information









The Gardens of Alcatraz
Punishment and Reward on the Rock: A Talk with Shelagh Fritz
Wednesday, February 20, 2013




The name Alcatraz immediately conjures up images of the famous prison, perched on a rocky scrap of land weathering the elements in San Francisco Bay, of Al Capone and the Birdman. But for the past 150 years there have also been gardens on the island. Beginning with military personnel who hauled in soil from the mainland to create a Victorian landscape, to a beautification project in the 1920s that brought in hundreds of trees and shrubs, to prisoners maintaining the gardens and finding respite from prison life, Alcatraz has been a dichotomy of barrenness and beauty, tribulation and triumph. In 2003 the Garden Conservancy, Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy, and the National Park Service joined forces to restore the gardens and today a small staff and army of dedicated volunteers plant and prune, compost and weed. Which makes 2013 a significant milestone in the history of Alcatraz – the ten-year anniversary of this collaboration to resurrect, preserve, and amplify the gardens.

The Hort is co-sponsoring this event. Our GreenHouse program on Rikers Island has been using horticulture to reduce the prisoner recidivism rate since 1996, including vocational training in garden design, installation, and maintenance, as well as design and construction of garden fixtures such as benches and planters. Upon their release, graduates of GreenHouse have the option to join the Green Team internship program. Click here for more information on GreenHouse.

Shelagh Fritz is the Garden Conservancy's horticulturist and project manager at the Gardens of Alcatraz. Shelagh began working as a gardener on Alcatraz in 2006. As the gardens' project manager since 2009, she has been a driving force in the reclamation, interpretation, and renewal of this surprising and surprisingly beautiful landscape. Shelagh has a degree in horticultural science and business from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada, and has held previous positions as chief horticulturist at Manulife Financial Head Office in Toronto; garden intern at Longwood Gardens in Pennsylvania; and conservatory gardener at Syon Park in England.

Date and time
Wednesday, February 20, 2013
6:00 p.m. Check-in and registration
6:30-7:30 Lecture

Location
New York School of Interior Design
170 East 70th Street
New York City, NY

Members of the Garden Conservancy and the Horticultural Society of New York: $25;
non-members: $30








Plant-O-Rama
A Trade Show and Symposium for Gardeners and Horticulturists
Tuesday, January 29, 2013




Jumpstart the 2013 Garden Season!

Join the Hort at the 17th Annual
Plant-O-Rama
A Trade Show and Symposium for Gardeners and Horticulturists

Brooklyn Botanic Garden
990 Washington Ave

Symposium Session – BBG Auditorium

9:15AM
Designing for place: Merging Art & Ecology in Regional Landscapes
Darrel Morrison, FASLA

10:15 AM
Plant Communities for Healthy Gardens
Roy Diblik, Northwood Perennial Farm, Burlington, WI 

11:15AM
Connecting Communities Panel Discussion:
The Role of Native Plants in Today’s Urban Landscape

Registration required
To register and for more information visit: brownpapertickets.com







Natural Cleaning Products
A Workshop with Common Good
Thursday, January 24, 2013




Did you know that some cleaning products contain hidden toxins? Learn how to make your own cleaning products with Sacha Dunn from Common Good. Together we will make some safe, simple household cleaners from everyday ingredients you probably have in your pantry. Learn why synthetic fragrances and toxic chemicals should be replaced with everyday household ingredients such as vinegar, baking soda, and citrus fruits. We'll bring some fresh herbs and flowers in from the garden and we'll play with essential oils so they will leave your home smelling lovely.

You'll take home a dish soap, all-purpose cleaner, room spray, and linen powder and our hope is that you will remake and reuse them forever. All materials are provided.

Sacha Dunn started Common Good because she wanted to refill her cleaning bottles and couldn't find anywhere to do that in her Brooklyn neighborhood. Two years later, they sell their refill stations and bottled products to many wonderful stores around the country and they’ve just launched a line of products with the new West Elm Market.

Sacha Dunn and Dawn Sinkowski are Common Good’s resident teachers. Both are former stylists with a keen eye for making a boring household product a little prettier and they're both devotees of the homemade cleaner. They also have years of research into household cleaners and chemistry to share and love to answer questions.

Doors open at 6:00pm;
Workshop starts at 6:30pm

Members: $30; Non-members: $50







Rosemary Verey
A Book Talk with Barbara Paul Robinson
Tuesday, December 11, 2012



Rosemary Verey was the last of the great English garden legends. Although she embraced gardening late in life, she quickly achieved international renown. She was the acknowledged apostle of the “English style,” on display at her home at Barnsley House, the “must have” adviser to the rich and famous, including Prince Charles and Elton John, and a beloved and wildly popular lecturer in America. With her architect-husband, she went on to create the gardens at their home that became a mandatory stop on every garden tour in the 1980s and 1990s. Drawing from garden history and its literature, she developed a language of classical formal design, embellished with her exuberant planting style.

Join Barbara Paul Robinson, who worked with Rosemary as a volunteer, saw her as both a person and a professional, and was close to her for the last twenty years of her life. A demanding and sometimes truculent taskmaster, and a relentless perfectionist, Rosemary Verey, in her life as in her work, was the very personification of the English garden style. Her influence will be felt for generations.

During a sabbatical from the law firm, Debevoise & Plimpton where she was the first woman partner, Barbara Paul Robinson worked as a gardener for Rosemary Verey at Barnsley House.  A hands-in-the-dirt gardener herself, she and her husband have created their own gardens at Brush Hill in northwestern Connecticut, featured in articles, books and television. A frequent speaker, Barbara has published articles in the New York Times, Horticulture, Fine Gardening and Hortus; she has also written a chapter in Rosemary Verey’s The Secret Garden. The gardens can be viewed at www.brushhillgardens.com.

Doors open at 6:00pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free





Extreme Whether
An Eco-drama with Music
Friday, December 7, 2012



Theater Three Collaborative and the New York Horticultural Society invite you to the premiere reading of Extreme Whether, an eco-drama with music!

Extreme Whether moves between the harsh world of realpolitik and the lush poetry of a vanishing nature. A family divided between climate scientists and industry publicists, struggles over control of an inherited wilderness estate and to make their voices heard. An elderly environmentalist, an eccentric young girl, and a frog complete the cast.

While all characters are fictional, the play owes a debt to the stories told in their books and papers by American climate scientists Michael Mann, James Hansen, and Jennifer Francis.

Written and directed by Karen Malpede
Music by Arthur Rosen
Featuring George Bartenieff, Soraya Broukhim, Joan MacIntosh, Alex Tavis, Ray Virta, and Kathleen Purcell

Karen Malpede, writer/director, co-founder of Theater Three Collaborative, is author of 17 plays on cutting-edge issues, editor of Acts of War: Iraq & Afghanistan in Seven Plays and a National McKnight Playwrights Fellow (for writers whose work has significantly influenced the American theater).
Arthur Rosen is resident composer at Theater Three Collaborative, where he has composed music/sound for Karen Malpede’s Prophecy and Another Life.
George Bartenieff, co-founder of Theater Three Collaborative, 4-time Obie-award-winning actor-producer,Drama Desk winner; recent Broadway: The Merchant of Venice, has appeared on, off, and off-off Broadway for over half a century. Recent film: Julie & Julia; TV: 30 Rock, Curb Your Enthusiasm, Law & Order, Zero Hour.
Soraya Broukhim, Core Member of the Living Theatre. She played Simone Weil in the film, An Encounter with Simone Weil.
Joan MacIntosh, a three time OBIE award-winning actor and Drama Desk winner, has appeared on and off-Broadway at the NYSF Public Theater and New York Theater Workshop. She was a founding member of the Performance Group.
Ray Virta has been in numerous Broadway productions including: An Enemy of the People, Arcadia, Hedda Gabler, A Man for All Seasons, Boeing-Boeing, Naked Girl on the Appian Way, Democracy, Betrayal, The Real Thing, The School for Scandal, Inherit the Wind, and many off-Broadway productions.
Alex Tavis has appeared on TV in One Life to Live (recurring), All My Children (recurring), Law and Order, Law and Order: CI, and Wall Street Warriors. He was also in an off-Broadway production of Ta'Ziyeh of Imam Hussein (Lincoln Center Festival).
Kathleen Purcell graduated from the London International School of Performing Arts in 2009. Since moving to NYC in 2010 she has worked as a stage manager, an actor, a lighting designer, a director, and a playwright.
Joan MacIntosh is recipient of 4 Obies; one for Sustained Excellence of Performance, a Drama Desk, Drama League, and Herald Angel (Edinburgh) and Elliot Norton Award. She is a Fox Fellow, a Professor of Acting at Yale and has acted around the world, on and off-Broadway. She is writing a book.

6:30pm
A $10 donation is suggested. Seating is limited.
RSVP to kcaringer@thehort.org






Handcrafted Soaps
A Workshop with George Pisegna
Thursday, December 6, 2012



The soap making can be simple or complex. Most handmade soap is made from glycerin which is a humectant, meaning it attracts moisture to your skin. When you purchase store-bought soap, the majority of the glycerin has been processed out. Therefore, when you make your own soap, you have the opportunity to create something that is glycerin rich and soft. Join us as we demonstrate the melt and pour process and create an assortment of beautiful, handcrafted glycerin soaps. We will use botanicals and organic essential oils; such as tea tree, lavender, rosemary, fir needle, clove, mint, olive oil, and goat’s milk. This workshop covers the basics of glycerin soap making that will allow you to craft your own soaps easily at home. Handmade soaps make wonderful gifts for any season that all will appreciated by everyone.

All materials provided.
Registration required.

Doors open at 6:00pm workshop starts at 6:30pm






Painting Vegetables, Warts and All
A Botanical Illustration Workshop with Asuka Hishiki
Friday, November 16 and Monday, November 19


Join Asuka Hishiki in exploring the bumps and knobs of the vegetables we encounter everyday in our kitchens, gardens, and markets.  Often overlooked as botanical subjects because of their more common status as food, they can be quite beautiful on their own.  In this workshop, vegetables will be your muse.  Hishiki will share her award-winning techniques and you will learn how to use masking fluid to build the key elements of an object, capturing the amazing variety and character of the vegetables we normally enjoy on our plates.

Asuka Hishiki holds a Master of Fine Arts from Kyoto City University of Arts in Japan where she studied oil painting. Plants and nature are always her inspiration. She is a self-taught botanical artist. Her work has been shown in many international exhibitions, including a recent solo exhibition at the Arsenal Gallery, NY.

Hishiki has two paintings, Brassica oleracea (Brussels sprouts) and Opuntia ficus-indicaon (Cactus fruit), featured in The 15th Annual International, which is on view at The Hort from September 14 – November 21.

10:00am to 5:00pm
Hort members $150; Non-members $185
Click here to view a materials list (PDF)
Register online or email programs@thehort.org







Yogaroma
Classes with Leah McKellop
Through Friday, November 16



Wind down your weekday at The Hort. Starting in October, The Hort will host a gentle yoga & aroma-therapy class beside the Plant Wall. Surrounded by green, breathe a little deeper and experience the calming effects of essential oils. Lavish in lavender, mingle with mint, and sink into cinnamon. Reconnect with nature each evening and experience the bliss and tranquility that can only come when we merge the restorative benefits of Hatha practice with the deeply healing effects of essential oils. You will feel the difference.

Born to the rocky hills and trees of Connecticut, Leah McKellop spent the first years of her life nurtured by the forest of a sleepy town. Family lore says she has been dancing and stretching since the womb. Though, her yoga practice truly took off as she came crashing down during a pole vault competition, resulting in a few years’ worth of injuries that were healed by a dedicated yoga practice. Leah has completed a 200-hr RYT and 500-hr RYT training with Atmananda Yoga Sequence (www.atmananda.com). She also mentored under Sabina Stahl of The Yoga Sequence (www.theyogasequence.com) and is completing a second 500-hr RYT training. In 2012 she moved from the concrete jungle to the real jungle of Costa Rica, where she taught and managed a yoga studio set right on the wild Pacific, Bamboo YogaPlay. While in New York she studied Applied Psychology at New York University, concentrating in Creative Arts Therapies, which has also weaved its way into her approach.

Leah invites her students to reconnect to nature around them. Her nurturing classes have an emphasis on alignment, both in the body and spirit, providing students the confidence they need to keep flying forward, transforming and dancing through life’s waves.

Classes will begin Monday, November 5, followed by November 7, 12, and 16

All classes are 6:30pm to 8:00pm
All levels of experience are welcome.
If you own a mat, please bring it, as our supply is limited.


Members $10 per class; Non-members $15 per class
Register online or email programs@thehort.org





“Last Look” Walkthrough with the Jurors
15th Annual International
with the American Society of Botanical Artists
Thursday, November 15, 2012

See this stunning exhibition of exquisitely rendered botanicals through expert eyes on an intimate guided walkthrough with jurors Patricia Jonas, Kathie Miranda, and Jessica Tcherepnine. This is also a great opportunity to see the show before it closes on Wednesday, November 21st.

This annual exhibition presents the most important artists in the field, both established and emerging. Selected from a field of 200 submissions, the forty-three paintings, drawings, and prints on view have been created by artists from the US, UK, Japan, Australia, Brazil, and Canada.

On this members-only tour, you’ll learn about the selection process and what makes for an award-winning work of art. The jurors will discuss the merits of many of the works, including award winning pieces by Heeyoung Kim (Best in Show), Ingrid Finnan (Award for Excellence), and Monika E. deVries Gohlke (Award for Print or Drawing).

Light refreshments will be served.

6:00pm; walkthrough starts at 6:30pm
FREE; current Hort and ASBA members only

Don't miss out—join or renew today!
RSVP required to membership@thehort.org






The Layered Garden
A Talk with David Culp
Wednesday, November 14, 2012



Brandywine Cottage is David Culp's beloved two-acre Pennsylvania garden where he mastered the design technique of layering — interplanting many different species in the same area so that as one plant passes its peak, another takes over. The result is a nonstop parade of color that begins with a tapestry of heirloom daffodils and hellebores in spring and ends with a jewel-like blend of Asian wildflowers at the onset of winter.

This lecture, The Layered Garden by David Culp, shows gardeners how to recreate the majestic display of his beloved Brandywine Cottage. It contains a basic lesson in layering—how to choose the correct plants by understanding how they grow and change throughout the seasons, how to design a layered garden, and tips on maintaining a layered garden. To illustrate how layering works, Culp will take you on a virtual tour through each part of his celebrated garden. The lecture culminates with his signature plants for all four seasons.

David Culp is the creator of the gardens at Brandywine Cottage in Downingtown, Pennsylvania. David has been lecturing about gardens nationwide for more than 15 years. His articles have appeared in Martha Stewart Living, Country Living, Fine Gardening, Green Scene, and many other publications. He is a former contributing editor to Horticulture magazine and served as chairman of the Mid-Atlantic Hardy Plant Society. David is Vice President for Sunny Border Nurseries in Connecticut. David is a herbaceous perennials instructor at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, PA. He has developed the Brandywine Hybrid strain of hellebores, and was recently cited in the Wall Street Journal for his expertise on snowdrops. His garden has been featured several times in Martha Stewart Living and on HGTV. Brandywine Cottage is listed in the Smithsonian Institution Archives of American Gardens. He is a recipient of the Distinguished Garden Award from the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. He has also been awarded the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society Award of Merit.  He serves on the Pennsylvania Horticultural Societies Gold Medal Plant Selection Committee.

Doors open at 6:00pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to programs@thehort.org








In light of the devastation left by hurricane Sandy on our fellow New Yorkers, we would like to ask those of you attending our Year-End Cocktail Reception to please consider bringing a non-perishable food item to be donated to City Harvest for their relief efforts. You will receive a Hort seed packet in return for your donation!

Most needed items include: canned fruit/vegetables, peanut butter, macaroni and cheese, and hot or cold cereal. City Harvest is a non-profit that exists to end hunger in communities throughout New York City through food rescue and distribution, education, and other practical, innovative solutions.

We're excited to bring together our community to celebrate all our efforts to make New York a better place to live. Please join us as we welcome Wilder Quarterly to celebrate another successful year at The Hort with specialty cocktails from St. Germain and Stinky Bklyn, along with unique and exciting potted plants that will be available from The Sill.

Wilder Quarterly is a magazine from Brooklyn for people enthralled by the natural world. It takes readers on explorations across the horticultural continuum. From food to travel, architecture to art, Wilder tells the stories of a broad growing world; one that encompasses beauty, architecture, history, science, music, design, travel, and food. In their pages you'll find foodies and chefs, fire escape gardeners, houseplant officionados, seed savers, landscape architects, artists, and botanists—all amateurs and experts alike. Wilder Quarterly and The Hort welcome one such enthusiast, Helen Hollyman, host of The Heritage Radio show "U Look Hungry," food writer, and truffle hunter. She will speak about the joys, perils, and the fabulous food that is the end result of the hunt.

The Sill is the destination for discovering potted plants that enhance the look and feel of your environment. They offer a curated selection of undemanding plants hand potted in high-design plantware, with clear instructions and exceptional service, to make indoor plants accessible to all. Founder, Eliza Blank grew up surrounded by plants in her parents’ suburban home. But when she moved to the city, she quickly faced the challenge of finding a plant suitable for her apartment, her lifestyle, and her newfound New York aesthetic. What she learned through her own attempts to find plants for her home, and to give as gifts, was that something that should be simple—an easy-care plant in an artistic planter—simply did not exist. She took action to launch The Sill to be the destination for discovering potted plants that enhance the look and feel of any environment.



Tuesday, November 13

Business Meeting | 5:30 pm
Members and Board Members only

Reception | 6:00pm
Free and open to the public

Click here to view pictures
from the celebration.







Grisaille Technique in Botanical Painting
A 3-Day Workshop with Wendy Hollender
November 5, 8, and 9, 2012



Join botanical artist, instructor, and author Wendy Hollender to learn the techniques outlined in her book Botanical Drawing in Color: A Basic Guide to Mastering Realistic Form and Naturalistic Color.  Students will learn how to use a grisaille technique for undertones in a neutral color and then how to layer color on top to create depth, using watercolor and watercolor pencils in combination with dry colored pencils. This technique is very immediate and materials are simple, allowing the artist to work easily in multiple locations and it is especially useful for work in the field.

On day one students will become familiar with the techniques and practice on simple forms. On day two and three a more detailed plant drawing will be completed.

Wendy Hollender began a career in botanical illustration after completing a certificate at the New York Botanical Garden in 1998.  Previously a home furnishing textile designer, she started WH Art & Design, using her botanical artwork in various products. Her work was included in the 13th International Exhibition at Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, and in exhibitions at the Royal Botanical Garden, Kew and the Smithsonian National Museum for Natural History.  Hollender’s illustrations have been published in the New York Times, Oprah Magazine, Real Simple, and The Sunday Observer (The Guardian).

Hollender’s painting, Abelmoschus Esculentus (Okra “Red Burgundy”) grown on her farm, is featured in The 15th Annual International, which is on view at The Hort from September 14 – November 21.

10:00am to 5:00pm
Members: $350; Non-members: $415
Click here to view a materials list (PDF)
Register online or email programs@thehort.org







Farm-to-Table Sauces
A Cooking Workshop with Saucy By Nature
Wednesday, October 24



Condiments and sauces are the perfect vehicle to elevate any meal. Store-bought sauces can be lacking in flavor and packed with unhealthy chemicals and additives. Making these from scratch may seem daunting, but with some simple tips and tricks from the experts at Saucy by Nature, sauce making can become an enjoyable and rewarding activity for the whole family. From dressing up a sandwich, using them as dips and simmering sauces, to jazzing up grilled cheese or using them as dessert toppings, you can bring a world of flavor to just about anything with the knowledge that each spoonful was hand crafted with a whole lot of love.

Learn the secrets behind some of Saucy by Nature’s farm-to-table recipes while creating some of their signature sauces, including the famous “Cilantro and Lime Sauce”.  Prezemek and Monika will lead a hands-on demonstration of how a simple condiment can be turned into a delicious and elaborate meal, with plenty of samples and tastings to go around!

Saucy by Nature is founded by a duo of travel-obsessed foodies, Przemek Adolf and Monika Luczak. They ate their way through a big chunk of the world including Southeast Asia, India and Nepal, the whole of Europe, the Caribbean, South America and Africa and became inspired by the uniqueness of regional cuisines, the food stories of the people they shared meals with and the ingredients that made up the dishes. They wanted to share our food adventures with people back home and got to thinking about recipes, knowing that the key to producing the best tasting food was using the freshest local vegetables and fruits and combining them with the highest quality ingredients like extra virgin olive oil, sea salt and fresh ground spices.

As kids they grew up eating with the seasons so they wanted to create a product that would celebrate every season’s harvest. They took a trip up to meet the farmers selling  at the Hunt's Point, Bronx wholesale market  and were inspired by the fresh ingredients spread before them and the hard work that each farmer put into growing their produce. Using this amazing resource of fresh veggies and fruits they began hand craft small batches of sauces inspired by their travels. They continue to cultivate the relationships with the farmers they met to get the best tasting ingredients growing right on their doorstep and preserve each season’s bounty jar by jar. Their passion for real food and authentic flavor further extends to only preserving foods naturally and in traditional fashion.

Workshop starts at 6:30pm
Members $25; Non-members $35
Materials provided
RSVP required; Space is Limited
Register online or email programs@thehort.org





Charles Eisenstein: Talks and Workshops
October 19, 20, and 21



Join acclaimed author-teacher, Charles Eisenstein, for a weekend of talks and workshops designed to engage, provoke, and expand the conversation about where we find ourselves in this time of rapid change and profound transition. Crises in the economy, the ecosystem, health, education, water, energy, and more are propelling our civilization toward a radically different way of living on planet earth.

Friday, October 19th
6:30 pm to 8:30 pm, talk
The More Beautiful World our Hearts Know is Possible

Register online
We live at a special historical moment, to use Joanna Macy's words, a Great Turning. But what is, exactly, this turning of the age whose imminence we feel? How does it practically translate into political, technological, and social change? How can we participate in it in the face of the grave situation our planet faces? Join Charles Eisenstein for a challenging and inspiring exploration of the dynamics of the present transition.

Saturday, October 20th
10:00 am to 3:00 pm, workshop
The Space Between the Stories

Register online
Civilization's transition mirrors that of many individuals: an old world falls apart and eventually we step into a new. As that happens, much that was once certain disintegrates, and our old ways of making choices and effecting change become obsolete. Vast new possibilities arise, even miraculous possibilities, yet we may also go through periods of loneliness and doubt. The purpose of this gathering is simple: to ground ourselves more solidly in the new world, so that we may more fully believe—and enact—what we know in our hearts. To ground the work in the body and bioenergetic system, Charles' wife Stella Eisenstein, L.Ac., will teach a nei-gong series as part of this workshop. (Please dress comfortably, suitable for movement)

Sunday, October 21st
10:00 am to 12:00 pm, book discussion
Sacred Economics Geek-out Session

Register online
This gathering is a chance to exercise our intellects. Bring your questions and ideas with the intention of receiving the perspective of Sacred Economics on a deeper level than what was provided in the book. Please come with a willingness to receive, not to evangelize your own pet theory, but (if you have one) to expand and enrich it. Come as well with questions, doubts, concerns—things in the book that just don't add up. Finally, come with practical situations to which you think Sacred Economics might apply. We will invoke the collective intelligence of the group and explore together.

2:00 pm to 4:00 pm, talk
Sacred Economics: Money, Gift, and Society

Register online
Money is so deeply woven into the fabric of our society that surely, for anything substantial to change, the money system must change as well. In this talk, Charles Eisenstein explores the root of the present money crisis, explaining why money has the effect it does on our society, our planet, and our own psychology. Then he describes what new economy the crisis might birth, and how to align with these changes by stepping into "the gift."

Seating is limited so please register early at the links above.
Contact Claudia at claudia.newyork@gmail.com with questions

For more information about Charles Eisenstein please visit: www.charleseisenstein.net

Co-sponsored by: Traditional Nutrition Guild and The Horticultural Society of New York







Cocktail Alchemy
with Herbalist Julianne Zaleta
Wednesday, October 17
PLEASE NOTE DATE CHANGE



Infusing vodka with flavors from your garden or pantry is as easy as having an imagination.  All you need is a little know how and a lot of vodka.  Having no discernable flavor of its own, vodka takes on the flavor of anything it comes in contact with.  This is the basis of herbal medicine making as the alcohol not only extracts the flavor but the medicinal properties of the plant as well. Macerated vodka is the starting point for many artisanal cocktails, not to mention liqueur making.

In this hands on workshop Julianne Zaleta will take you step by step through the process of infusing vodka with herbs, spices, dried fruit, nuts and grains.  We'll make three flavors you can take home with you and sample a few crazy flavors from the presenter's collection.  At the end we'll celebrate by mixing up a cocktail for everyone to sample.

Julianne Zaleta is a professional herbalist, aromatherapist, & natural perfumer.  As the sole proprietor of Herbal Alchemy Apothecary, she has been crafting artisanal and bespoke perfumes from the purest elements of nature as well as therapeutic remedies and elixirs for a wide variety of ailments.  She has trained with Michael Scholes, Jeanne Rose and Mandy Aftel and is a certified aromatherapist as well as a licensed massage therapist and meditation teacher.  Her products are handmade in her studio atelier in Brooklyn, NY.  Recently she has turned her attention to artisanal cocktails which makes her work life quite enjoyable, as you can imagine.

Workshop starts at 6:30pm
Members $25; Non-members $35
Materials provided
Must be over 21 to attend workshop; RSVP required; Space is Limited
Register online or email programs@thehort.org






Designing for Special Needs
A Discussion with David Kamp
Monday, October 15, 2012


A critical need of the 21st century is the incorporation of nature, healing and design to enhance the development of restorative spaces. David Kamp will share his fruitful collaborative experience, using Dirtworks's award-winning projects, to explore the site-design challenges and opportunities that are unique to creating healthy, healing spaces—including therapeutic gardens—for the diverse range of individuals with special needs.

David Kamp is the founding principal of Dirtworks, PC, a landscape architecture practice deeply rooted in its design philosophy: to provide the opportunity for everyone to connect with nature on their own terms, in their own way and at their own pace, regardless of their capabilities. David has over 30 years' experience in the private and public sectors. Prior to forming his own firm, he participated in large-scale site development, including the design of Australia's Parliament House and a variety of projects throughout the United States, Europe, and the Caribbean.

David is a Fellow of the American Society of Landscape Architects (FASLA) and a National Academician (NA) of the National Academy, an institution with artists and architects at its core that aims for the highest echelons of artistic expression. As a Loeb Fellow (LF) in Advanced Environmental Studies at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, David researched and studied a range of factors advancing the effectiveness of nature and gardens to influence health care environments. As an artist-in-residence at the MacDowell Colony, America's oldest and most prestigious artist colony, he confirmed his exploration with the development of a series of prototypical gardens serving a range of individuals with special needs. He also contributed to the development of the Green Guide for Healthcare Version 2.0 Pilot, a best-practices guide for evaluating health and sustainability for the healthcare industry.

6:00pm to 7:00pm
1.5 LACES HSW CEUs

Register with Donna Panton at rsvp@NYASLA.org






Soil is Key to Quality Food—Can You Dig It?
A Discussion with Dan Kittredge
Friday, October 12, 2012



Is organically grown food more nutritious than food grown conventionally? The debate continues evidenced by the recent Sanford University report. Both sides avoid the role of soil, why remineralizing is important, and known methods used to measure the nutrient density of food. Join soil expert and organic farmer, Dan Kittredge, as he digs into this deep topic.

An inquisitive second-generation organic farmer, Dan Kittredge advocates moving beyond organic. He has put together and is popularizing a system for "Bionutrient-Rich Crop Production," often abbreviated as "nutrient-dense farming." Kittredge started his experimenting with nutrient-dense principles on Many Hands Organic Farm in Barre, Massachusetts, where he grew up. Kittredge was spurred to explore the nutrient-dense paradigm after reflecting on the problem of mediocre yields and predictable insect and disease outbreaks on small organic farms. The Bionutrient Food Association, bionutrient.org started as a project of The Real Food Campaign: realfoodcampaign.org, whose mission is to empower and educate farmers towards the production of quality food. BFA now has its own non-profit status and advocates for vital soils and nourishing food nationally. Today, Kittredge farms his own 15-acre homestead where he raises grass-fed beef, goats, sheep and a full spectrum of vegetables. Practicing what he preaches, he finds it very easy to make good money growing nutrient dense food.

Discussion starts at 6:30pm

Register online or email marshall_philip@yahoo.com for more information.








Come Celebrate Open House New York with The Hort!
Saturday, October 6, 2012

The Horticultural Society of New York, designed by Marpillero Pollak Architects, is an oasis tucked between Times Square and Penn Station. The Hort headquarters is a multi-functional space for exhibitions, film screenings, lectures, and workshops, which also houses the largest public library for gardening and horticulture in Manhattan. The open, light-filled space, which features a living green screen and moveable gallery walls, is a refreshing antidote to the commotion of Midtown Manhattan. Join us as we open our space on Saturday for America's largest architecture and design event, Open House New York weekend.

Our gallery and library will be open with special hours for the event. For those of you who can't make it during the week, this is a great chance to come see our current exhibition, check out our library, and enjoy one of the fun activities listed below.

All day | Garden Display
Come view photographs of our New York City Garden Renovation Projects.

All day | DIY Workshops & Activities
Participate in pumpkin decorating, cider and homebrewed beer tasting, printmaking, and much more.

3pm | Gallery Tour
Join us for an opportunity to view the 15th Annual International Exhibition with the American Society of Botanical Artists on a guided tour with our curator Chris Murtha.


11:00am to 5:00pm
Free and open to the public


Email programs@thehort.org for more information.







Introduction to Painting on Vellum: Autumn Berries
A Botanical Painting Workshop with Carol Woodin
Friday, October 5, 2012



Learn how to paint on real animal skin vellum from the master herself! Woodin will begin with a short discussion about vellum and its properties, followed by an instruction of some cleaning and watercolor techniques on scraps of vellum provided by the instructor. Using a small subject, students will then make a drawing and transfer it to their piece of vellum. For the remainder of the class, Carol will guide students in the practice of layering color and building form in transparent drybrush watercolor. By the end of the day students will have a completed (or nearly so) a painting of a seasonal subject.

Carol Woodin has been painting plants in watercolor for about 20 years.  In 1995, she was awarded a Gold Medal by the RHS of England and in 1998, she received the ASBA Diane Bouchier Award from the American Society of Botanical Artists.  Her work has been exhibited around the world, most recently at UBS Gallery in New York and at the Shirley Sherwood Gallery in the UK.  Some notable collections that include her work are the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Alisa and Isaac M. Sutton collection.  She is currently preparing the plates for the upcoming monograph, Slipper Orchids of the Tropical Americas, to be published by Kew Gardens.  Having served on the Board of the ASBA, she is now its Director of Exhibitions.

Woodin’s watercolor on vellum, Paphiopedilum 'Hsingying' (Slipper Orchids), is featured in The 15th Annual International, which is on view at The Hort through November 21.

10:00am to 5:00pm
Hort members $150; Non-members $185
Click here to view a materials list (PDF)
Register online or email programs@thehort.org






Green Roof Boot Camp
New York City Green Roof Professional (GRP) Training
October 4–7, 2012



The Green Roof Professional (GRP) accreditation program is comprised of four full-day courses that offer participants from a diverse range of disciplines the knowledge and skills required to successfully market, design, budget, install and maintain green (vegetated) roofs.

Recommended courses for individuals preparing to sit for the GRP accreditation exam include:
Green Roof Design 101
Green Roof Design and Installation 201
Green Roof Waterproofing and Drainage 301
Green Roof Plants Growing Media 401


Each course is approved for continuing education credits by GBCI, AIA CES, LA CES, RCI, and APLD. Each course includes lunch, refreshments and a 100-page course manual. Tours of local green roofs will be offered in conjunction with this event (weather permitting).

Hort members can receive a $25 discount per course by using the discount code 'HSNYmember'

For more information, and to register visit Green Roofs for Healthy Cities






The Unexpected Houseplant
A Book Talk with Tovah Martin
Thursday, October 4, 2012



Get ready for the Houseplant Revolution. What the world needs now is more green close by—and houseplants are the answer. These aren’t your grandmother’s dowdy, dusty versions. These are houseplants with panache. These are plants that you didn’t necessarily associate with windowsills. Have you ever thought of growing a perennial as a housemate, for example? Heucheras and primroses are just a couple of the unexpected houseplants recommended in this lecture. And we talk all about how to bust houseplants out of their plastic past and into a swank future. What? You’ve tried and failed with houseplants? Here’s how to make your windowsill into a success story without quitting your day job. You and kangaroo paws are going to live happily ever after. Following her presentation, Tovah will give a hands-on demonstration of The Unexpected Houseplant. Martin's approach is revolutionary—picture brilliant spring bulbs by the bed, lush perennials brought in from the garden, quirky succulents in the kitchen, even flowering vines and small trees growing beside an easy chair. Along with loads of visual inspiration, readers will learn how to make unusual selections, where to best position plants in the home, and valuable tips on watering, feeding, grooming, pruning, and troubleshooting, season by season.

Tovah Martin emerged from 25 years working at Logee's Greenhouses with a serious houseplant addiction. Author of the classics The New Terrarium and Tasha Tudor's Garden, Tovah has written more than a dozen gardening books. She served as garden editor for Victoria magazine throughout its lifetime and has been named the new Victoria's Writer in Residence for 2012. In addition, her articles appear in a broad range of magazines and periodicals, including Country Gardens, Garden Design, Coastal Home, Martha Stewart Living, House Beautiful, Connecticut magazine, Yankee, The Litchfield County Times, and The Daily Telegraph. For two years, she served as segment producer and frequent guest on the PBS television series Cultivating Life, and she is a repeat guest on the CBS Sunday Early Show. Tovah teaches houseplant cultivation to Master Gardeners and lectures extensively throughout the country.

Doors open at 6:00pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to programs@thehort.org






Artful Collage from Found Objects
A Book Talk & Workshop with Ellen Spector Platt
Thursday, September 27, 2012



Techniques of collage were first used at the time of the invention of paper in China, around 200 BC. Originating from the French word "coller", meaning "to glue", the collage allows one to experiment with a wide range of materials to achieve amazing end results. Today, a collage is a work of art composed of numerous materials, such as paper, newsprint, photographs, ribbons or other objects attached to a background and can even be made with physical materials or electronic images.

Join us as we welcome Ellen Spector Platt for a talk about her new book, Artful Collage from Found Objects, that incorporates plant and garden themes, stressing recycled, repurposed and reused materials. Following a brief lecture that discusses gathering, designing, and manipulating found objects, Ellen will hold a hands-on demonstration involving cutting and tearing, gluing and other attaching techniques. Each participant will create their own collage of a striking garden memory to take home.

Guests will need to bring small garden treasures of their own like photos, plant labels, pressed flowers and leaves, copies of old botanical prints, pods, seeds, seed packs, special papers, postage stamps with garden themes, floral fabric, pieces of other old craft work like embroidery. The Hort will provide all other crafting materials.

Ellen Spector Platt lives in New York City and is the author of eleven books, including Lavender: How to Grow and Use the Fragrant Herb. She has lectured widely on gardening and craft topics, including the Philadelphia, Boston and San Francisco Flower Shows, Longwood Gardens, NYBG, BBG and at Epcot International Flower Show at Disney World, who proclaimed her one of the country’s Great American Gardeners in 1998. She was the proprietor of Meadow Lark Flower & Herb farm in PA for many years and now gardens on a rooftop in Manhattan.
She co-writes the blog, gardenbytes.com.

Limited space available
Workshop starts at 6:00pm
Hort members: $30 Non-members: $45

Register online or email programs@thehort.org






Andrew Jackson Downing
A Book Talk with Robert Twombly
Wednesday, September 19, 2012



Known during his lifetime and even today as the “father” of American landscape design, Andrew Jackson Downing (1815-52) was also a pioneering proponent of the movement to create urban parks. His four best-selling books and his editorship from 1846 to 1852 of The Horticulturist, the most widely read publication of its type during those years, made him one of this nation’s most influential public intellectuals as well as one of its most outspoken advocates of national beautification in general.

Robert Twombly’s illustrated lecture will review Downing’s life and accomplishments, including his design philosophy and its applications, his plan for the “Public Grounds” (1851-52) in Washington, D. C. authorized by Congress but not constructed, its influence on Vaux and Olmsted’s program for Central Park, and his concept of “republicanism” that informed all he built and wrote.

Robert Twombly recently retired as "Professor of Architectural History" at the Spitzer School of Architecture, the City College of New York, where as an adjunct he continues to offer a seminar each spring on selected 19th, 20th and 21st century American and European architects. He is the author of numerous essays, reviews and books including biographies of Frank Lloyd Wright and Louis Sullivan, what he considers his best book--Power and Style: A Critique of Twentieth-Century Architecture in the United States--which, he says, no one read and, most recently, had edited a series of  the Essential Texts of Wright, Louis Kahn, Frederick Law Olmsted, and now Andrew Jackson Downing. At present  he is working on a study of Philip Johnson's political career during the 1930s. He lives in Manhattan and in West Nyack, New York.

Talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to programs@thehort.org






The Joy of Foraging
with Gary Lincoff
Wednesday, September 12, 2012



Discover the edible riches your backyard, local parks, woods, and even roadside! In The Joy of Foraging, Gary Lincoff shows you how to find fiddlehead ferns, rose hips, beach plums, bee balm, and more, whether you are foraging in the urban jungle or the wild, wild woods. You will also learn about fellow foragers—experts, folk healers, hobbyists, or novices like you—who collect wild things and are learning new things to do with them every day. Wherever you live-any season, any climate-you'll find essential tips on where to look for native plants, and how to know without a doubt the difference between edibles and toxic look-alikes. There are even ideas and recipes for preparing and preserving the wild harvest yearround. Let Gary take you on the ultimate tour of our edible wild kingdom!

Gary Lincoff is the author of The Complete Mushroom Hunter, and the author, co-author, or editor of several books and articles on mushrooms, including The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms. He teaches courses on mushroom and plant identification and use at the New York Botanical Garden and has led wild mushroom and edible wild plant study trips and forays to 30 countries across Asia, Africa, Europe, and South, Central, and North America. Lincoff chaired the Telluride Mushroom Festival for 25 years (1980–2004), and still participates as its principal speaker. He is also a featured “myco visionary” in the award-winning documentary, Know Your Mushrooms, by Ron Mann. Lincoff also founded and led the New York City Edible Wild Plant Workshop, which featured a once-a-week wild edibles dinner plus a weekend hunt for edible wild plants and mushrooms in city parks. Patricia Wells published his edible wild plant recipes in an article in the New York Times, and he has been profiled in the Village Voice and New York magazine. He lives in New York City.

Workshop starts at 6:30pm
Hort members: Free; Non-members: $10

Register online or email programs@thehort.org






The Hamptons & Long Island Homegrown Cookbook
A Book Talk with Leeann Lavin
Thursday, June 14, 2012



Author and Examiner.com Food & Drink editor, Leeann Lavin tells the good-food stories of farmers who rise before the roosters to bring fresh produce, meats, cheeses, honey, and seafood to these local chefs and area farmers’ markets. She profiles Long Island’s best pasture-to-plate chefs who kick off the day with an early trip to the markets & local growers and wrap it up in the wee hours of the night, after feeding legions of appreciative diners. The food stories are lovingly told—exploring the work and passion of the chefs and the local food artisans, farmers, and fisherman—who together, are dedicated to connecting to the land to produce menus that boast delicious homegrown flavors. The book offers a rare and intimate tour of the kitchens and gardens that create local, seasonal food.

Brimming with food stories from the region’s best real-food chefs and the growers who inspire their homegrown menus, more than 80 tempting recipes, and stunning photographs of the iconic dishes, authentic & sustainable ingredients, and the majestic land and seascapes that are the romantic hallmarks of the area’s food culture. Two chefs featured in The Hamptons & Long Island Homegrown Cookbook and the growers who inspire their homegrown recipes will join Leeann to demonstrate their masterful cooking using local, fresh ingredients. Tastings too! These chefs are Chef Tom Schaudel, CoolFish Grille and Wine Bar (and several other restaurants), and Chef Bryan Futerman, Foody's. Two growers will also be in attendance: Jon Snow, Master Gardener, Camp Director: A founding member of Hayground Camp and School and Kareem Massoud, Paumonok Vineyards, owner and vintner.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to info@thehort.org







Pickling at Home
A Workshop with Bob McClure of McClure's Pickles
Thursday, May 24, 2012



Pickling originally came about as a method of preserving food from the harvest, but has since evolved into a culinary art.  From traditional dills to mouth-watering watermelon rinds, pickling has become an incredible diverse craft, one that lends itself well to the do-it-yourself ethos.

Please join us as Bob McClure of McClure’s Pickles teaches us to bring this delicious skill into our own kitchens. Bob will talk about the history and basics of pickling, and give a hands-on demonstration.  Everyone will have the opportunity to create their own batch of McClure’s delicious pickles and relish.  The McClures are strong believers in using seasonal, local produce, and have been a long-standing presence in farmer’s markets in Detroit and Brooklyn.

Growing up, Bob and Joe McClure never realized how influential pickles would be in their lives. In 2006, using their great grandmother’s recipe, they started McClure’s Pickles after years of making pickles in their tiny Michigan kitchen. In Brooklyn they produce small batches for research and development.

Bob McClure is an actor, comedy writer and pickle maker living in Brooklyn, NY. He splits his time between Detroit and Brooklyn. In Brooklyn, he manages new product development, east coast distribution, small batch production and a lot of other things from brand management and national account management for McClure's.

All materials included
NOTE: Classes must be paid in full at the time of registration. A full refund will be given with a 5 business day notice only or if the workshop is cancelled.

Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $25; Non-members $35

This workshop is SOLD OUT.







A Private Oasis
A Book Talk with Edmund Hollander
Monday, May 21, 2012



Whether a home is a great place to live often depends on what lies beyond its walls. The landscape—when it has a well-thought-out shape and character—gives a home much of its character and satisfaction. In The Private Oasis, two of New York’s leading landscape architects, Edmund Hollander and Maryanne Connelly, guide readers through a series of remarkable landscapes and gardens, explaining how to apply their techniques, no matter what the size of the reader’s property.

Since founding Edmund D. Hollander Landscape Architect Design in 1990, Hollander and Connelly and the more than a dozen landscape architects on their staff have designed hundreds of residential landscapes, from the palatial to the more modest. Every landscape, they believe, has a story to tell. The aim of the landscape architect — working with the homeowners, the site, and the architecture of the house — is to decide what that story is, and see that it’s told well.

The Private Oasis focuses on built elements in the landscape. A successor volume will focus on plantings. Together, the two volumes will give readers a comprehensive orientation to the making of residential landscapes.

Edmund Hollander is President of Edmund Hollander Design, a firm with offices in New York and Sag Harbor which includes environmental planners, landscape architects and horticulturists. He has taught at the City College of the University of New York and in the Graduate School of Fine Arts at the University of Pennsylvania and has lectured at the New York Botanical Garden. He is the Past President of the New York Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects and was recently elected a Fellow in the American Society of Landscape Architects.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to info@thehort.org







The Great Re-Skilling
Presented by Evolver, Ecophilia, and The Hort
Thursday, May 17, 2012



Join us for an interactive party where you'll learn new skills. There will be music, art, bodywork (by donation), dinner, vending and skill sharing.

Spring is here and the skill shares at this event will focus on growing food in an urban environment from a permaculture perspective as well as holistic body care, alternative energy, green mapping and the basics of bartering. This event includes:

Organic Chocolate Tasting
Hudson Valley “Art Pack” Seeds for Sale
Free Bike Repair
Live Barter Market
Designing your Urban Permaculture Garden
Self-Applied Acupressure
Growing Food in Urban Spaces
Yoga and Herbs
And More!

6pm–10:30pm

$10 (suggested donation at the door)

Register online or email info@thehort.org








Paula Hayes: Artist and Landscape Designer
An Illustrated Talk and Book Signing
Wednesday, May 16, 2012



Well established as a contemporary artist, Paula Hayes is known internationally for her sculptural terrariums in organically-shaped hand-blown glass. She has also enjoyed a successful career designing sustainable gardens that range from urban rooftops to seaside landscapes.  Her first monograph, Paula Hayes (The Monacelli Press), collects 10 years of her work as both an artist and landscape designer, with never-before-seen or published material representing her terrariums, exhibitions, and gardens. For this illustrated talk, Hayes will discuss the relationship between the various components of her practice and how they overlap and inform each other. The talk will be followed by a reception and book signing.

Hayes’ exhibition, Land Mind, can currently be seen at New York’s Lever House through April 27.  Nocturne of the Limax maximus, her much-heralded exhibit at MoMA, enjoyed an unprecedented installation in the museum’s lobby.  She has also shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, Jeanne Greenburg-Rohatyn’s Salon 94, the Marianne Boesky Gallery, and the Wexner Art Center in Ohio.  Her work was recently included in Verdant at the Massachusetts College of Art & Design, and in summer 2013, her work will be part of the Emscherkunst triennial in Essen, Germany.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free and open to the public

RSVP (required) to cmurtha@thehort.org







Small-Space Container Gardens
A Talk with Fern Richardson
Thursday, May 10, 2012



”Create A Potager Garden…With a Twist!”
Growing your own food need not turn your small outdoor space into an eyesore. Popular garden DIY gardener Fern Richardson will share ideas for creating beautiful container gardens that just happen to be full of edible plants.

Gardening is both very “here and now” and also forward focused. Yes, most edibles are fleeting and must be enjoyed in the moment. But at the same time, for example, if you want vegetables in the fall, you have to start planting in summer. In addition to planning, Fern will introduce you to fruits and vegetables that you may not have thought of growing before – and that you can grow in a container garden. Fern will also show you how to upcycle found objects like BBQs, wine boxes, and flour sifters into fun containers that will add whimsy to any garden.

And Fern will advise you on how to create a fun, funky (and budget friendly!) vertical planters that will make good use of the small amount of space many urban gardeners have to work with.

Fern Richardson is the award-winning garden blogger behind Life on The Balcony. Her new book, Small-Space Container Gardens, publishes in February 2012, and expands on the popular designs and projects from her blog.

Fern has a BA in graphic design and a law degree (although she doesn’t practice law, nor work as a graphic designer!). In 2010 Fern became a certified master gardener and she lives with her husband and four cats in Southern California. By day, she works in marketing for Kellogg Garden Products. Learn more at lifeonthebalcony.com.

Photos from top to bottom by: Marie Viljoen, Kevin O’Shea, Jenny Peterson, Richard Mount, Caitlin Atkinson

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to info@thehort.org







Introduction to Rooftop Urban Agriculture
A Course with Ben Flanner of Brooklyn Grange
Friday, May 4, 2012

Learn about multiple approaches to growing food on rooftops through design and maintenance principles, and case studies drawn from across North America. This course:

Ben Flanner is the head farmer and one of the founders of the Brooklyn Grange, a 1-acre (40,000 square foot) rooftop farm in Long Island City, Queens. The Grange is built on the roof of an industrial warehouse. The entire space is covered with a green roof membrane and soil in raised beds. Started in collaboration with Roberta's restaurant in Bushwick, the farm is a pioneering endeavor, in that it is the first financially sustainable commercial farm in the city. The farm’s vegetables are sold via CSAs, markets and restaurant deliveries with the profits being used to pay rent, farmers' salaries, and other expenses. Prior to founding the Brooklyn Grange, Ben co-founded and managed the Eagle St Rooftop farm in 2009. There, he collected critical information on sales by crop, in order to make the business plan and calculate the necessary area to create a scaled up viable rooftop farm.

Building on the success of their flagship location, Brooklyn Grange is expanding their operations to a 45,000 square foot rooftop at Brooklyn Navy Yard in May 2012, with funding support from New York City's Department of Environmental Protection.

8:30 am - 12:00 pm
Space is limited. Reserve your seat now.
Tuition is $175 US for Hort and GRHC members, and $199 for non-members. Tuition includes an 85-page course manual. Admission for the tour and lunch at Brooklyn Grange rooftop farm is $40.
Click here for more information and to register on GRHC's website.





Timber Press Celebrates Landscape Architecture Month
From Art to Landscape
with W. Gary Smith
Monday, April 30, 2012


"Unleashing Creativity in Garden Design"
Designers solve problems; artists raise questions. Step beyond creating “solutions” in garden design and find delight in a world where there are more questions than answers. Renowned landscape designer W. Gary Smith will teach you how to ask and answer those daunting design questions: How do I begin this creative process?;  Where can I find design inspiration?; How will I know if my design is successful?

After exploring a visual vocabulary of shapes, patterns, and processes that drive the Universe, Gary will show you artists’ techniques for observing and recording it all.

If you approach garden design like an artist, with an artist’s tools and ways of looking at the world, you will be able to design gardens that combine the unique character of a place with imaginative spirit. You’ll also create inspiring gardens that have real meaning, for yourself as well as others.

One of North America's leading landscape designers, W. Gary Smith specializes in botanical gardens and arboretums, as well as public art installations and private gardens, often weaving together local ecological and cultural themes.

He received the Award of Distinction from the Association of Professional Landscape Designers for his work on Enchanted Woods at Winterthur in Delaware, Peirce's Woods at Longwood Gardens, and the Stopford Family Meadow Maze in Pennsylvania. Peirce's Woods also received a Design Merit Award from the American Society of Landscape Architects. From Art to Landscape, his recent book from Timber Press, received American Horticultural Society Book Award. Learn more at WGarySmithDesign.com

All photographs and illustrations by W. Gary Smith

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to info@thehort.org







Recreation
An Interactive Walking Tour with Jon Cotner
Saturday, April 28 and Sunday, April 29, 2012



“The primary purpose of Central Park is to provide the best practicable means of recreation for the inhabitants of all classes.” –Frederick Law Olmsted

Recreation is a new interactive walk designed by Jon Cotner. To celebrate National Landscape Architecture Month, as well as the legacy of Frederick Law Olmsted, Cotner will lead dialogues with participants as they stroll through Central Park. Olmsted’s architectural philosophy will be put into play, bringing everyone closer to the Park’s physical and social landscapes.

Jon Cotner is an artist and poet. His work revives the ancient, endangered practices of walking and talking. Recent projects for the BMW Guggenheim Lab, Elastic City, and the Poetry Society of America have been praised by Bookforum, The New Yorker, and The Wall Street Journal. Cotner is the author, with Andy Fitch, of Ten Walks/Two Talks. He lives in Brooklyn, NY, and teaches at Pratt Institute.

3:00-4:30 pm
Starting Point: Southwest Corner of Sheep Meadow
in Central Park
$10 per walk; maximum 8 people per walk






Mushrooms Wild and Cultivated
A Workshop with Ari Rockland-Miller
Thursday, April 26, 2012



We’ve all done it: you walk past a mushroom, appearing as if by magic after a heavy rain, and wonder what exactly it is. Is it edible? Poisonous? Medicinal? Mushroom identification is an invaluable skill, especially if you want to learn the art of foraging: without it you could find yourself in a very uncomfortable situation, but take the time and caution to learn the nuances of different species, and you could find yourself with a delicious bounty. Ari Rockland-Miller will be teaching us the basics of the gourmet and medicinal mushrooms common to our region, connecting us with a hobby that will enrich our understanding of the natural world and build appreciation for an ancient, critically relevant, and useful body of knowledge.

Join us for an illustrated lecture introducing us to some of the safest and most distinctive species for beginners, focusing on those in season for our region. After an explanation of Ari’s approach to the safest and most fruitful way to forage for mushrooms, he will be showing us how to inoculate a log with shiitake mushroom spawn. Everyone in attendance will take home an inoculated log, giving you fresh shiitake mushrooms in your own kitchen and the resources needed to kick start your new hobby.

Ari Rockland-Miller, co-founder of The Mushroom Forager, is an ardent mycophile who enjoys nothing more than the exhilarating feeling of the mushroom hunt. Over the past few years he has found hundreds of pounds of gourmet and medicinal wild mushrooms, and he loves sharing his knowledge with blog readers.  Ari became an expert in shiitake cultivation after managing Cornell University’s Mushroom Research Project and the MacDaniels Nut Grove, Cornell’s forest farming demonstration site. He has a BA from Brown University, where he studied Buddhist philosophy as well as environmental policy and ethics. When he is not out in the woods filling baskets with mushrooms, Ari enjoys writing songs and playing music with friends.

All materials included
NOTE: Classes must be paid in full at the time of registration. A full refund will be given with a 5 business day notice only or if the workshop is cancelled.

Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $20; Non-members $30

This workshop is now sold out.



Photo credit (third image, at right): Shiitake growing through lichen by Tim Thornewell, Mushroom Gourmet NZ





Building Sustainable Communities
2012 NYASLA Design Awards Projects & Panel Presentation
Tuesday, April 24, 2012



Join us for an evening of presentations and discussion on building sustainable communities presented by 2012 NYASLA Award Winners.  Presentations of these projects, ranging from master planning for an entire city to building a community garden, will illustrate the importance that sustainability has at various scales and different landscapes within the public realm.  The discussion to follow, led by Nette Compton, Director of Green Infrastructure at the NYC Parks Department, will focus on how the lessons from these sites can transfer to work throughout New York and beyond.  Issues that are often the focus of public work, such as funding, community engagement, lasting design and maintenance will be examined through the lens of sustainability.

Presenters:
Elena Brescia / Scape Studio / 103rd Street Community Garden, Harlem, NY
Robin Key / Robin Key Landscape Architecture / Serviam Gardens, Bronx, NY
Jeffrey Longhenry / Nelson Byrd Woltz / Greening America's Capitals, Hartford, Connecticut

Elena Brescia, RLA, ASLA, joined SCAPE in 2005, after 12 years of practice, and became a partner in 2007.  She plays a crucial role in the firm, advancing ideas throughout the design process from concept to built form. Her backgrounds in the fine arts and conservation have fostered a deep interest for the creative process and the importance of remaining faithful to its integrity.  She understands the value of preservation as well as the need for current inhabitation, and believes that judicious interventions can both preserve and enhance our environment. Elena earned a Bachelor of Arts in Art History from Fordham University in 1985, receiving the Sophocles Papanicolaou Award for Excellence in Art History and Studio Art. She holds a Master of Landscape Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania in 1993, where she received the ASLA Certificate of Honor.

Robin Key, RLA, ASLA, has over 30 years of experience in the field of landscape architecture. Her work emphasizes a background in site planning and plant knowledge. Since 1987, Robin has been the principal of her own firm which has a strong foundation in residential design and has expanded, in the past decade, to include a portfolio of educational and institutional projects as well as pro bono work.  Currently the firm is working on projects at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Stony Brook University and Manchester Library in Manchester, Vermont. Robin graduated from the University of Vermont with a degree in Plant and Soil Science and pursued her graduate studies in landscape architecture at Cornell University.

Jeffrey Longhenry, RLA, ASLA, is a project manager at Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects New York office, with more than ten years of experience on a wide range of work, from large scale ecological restoration projects within the firm's Conservation Agriculture Studio to urban master plans, campus design, small urban parks, and private gardens. Varied in typology and in scale, these design projects collectively place a high value on the contemporary expression of ecological systems within the working landscape, through engaging native plants, processing site water, and maximizing habitat value, while offering a memorable experience. He earned his Master of Landscape Architecture degree from the University of California Berkeley in 2002 where he received the Beatrix Ferrand Memorial Fellowship and several design competition awards.

Nette Compton, RLA, ASLA, is the Director of Green Infrastructure for the New York City’s Parks Department.  She was project manager and fellow for Parks’ High Performance Landscape Guidelines, and now works with the Department of Environmental Protection on implementing their Green Infrastructure Plan.  She has worked on sustainability initiatives with multiple city agencies over the past 5 years.  She holds a MS in Urban Ecology and is an adjunct professor at Fordham University. 

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to info@thehort.org





Tablescape
A Public Viewing with the Designers
Tuesday, April 17, 2012



Please join us at 583 Park for the public viewing of our annual Spring gala, The New York Flower Show Dinner Dance. Come to enjoy these extravagant tablescape designs and meet some of New York City’s top designers. You’ll also see how the space is transformed into numerous elegant and dramatic dinner party settings in a spectacular range of styles.

This year’s theme is “Couture en Fleur” and we know that you’ll be inspired by the designers’ creative and unique floral interpretations.

To learn more about the 2012 Designers, click here.

3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
583 Park Ave (at 63rd Street)
Hort members FREE; Non-members $10






Botany For Designers
A Lecture with Kimberly Duffy Turner
Thursday, April 12, 2012



"Like dabs of paint and brush strokes in a painting, individual plants and their placement are what creates a garden or yard. It’s easy to walk into a nursery or garden store and become overwhelmed by the wide selection of plants. With so many choices, how is it possible to comprise plant schemes with ease, especially when microclimatic conditions are difficult? This lecture will give an overview of the steps to take in creating a successful plant palette. I will discuss the design features of plants and how to use them in combination to transform a garden space into the retreat you wish it to be. Topics will include using plant forms to define outdoor rooms, using leaves and/or bark as a prominent feature of the garden, and using flowers and fruits to accent the garden. I’ll talk about plant biological requirements, color theory, and the use of texture to create a balanced composition in the landscape."

Kimberly Turner is a registered landscape architect who has been designing landscapes for nearly 15 years. She has a background in both horticulture and landscape architecture, having earned her B.S. in Landscape Horticulture from the University of Maine and her Masters of Landscape Architecture from the University of Massachusetts. She received an ASLA honor award in 2001 for her graduate work and is an associate member of ASLA.

Kim has designed all types of landscapes from parks and monuments to college campuses, healthcare facility gardens and private homes.  Possessing both strong graphic and presentation skills, Kim finds working closely with clients the most rewarding and believes strongly in the power of collaboration during the design process.

Kim has always been interested in the ways plants and landscapes impact people on a psychological level. She devoted her thesis work to therapeutic gardens and was asked to present her research in Edinburgh, Scotland.  She strives to make gardens and landscapes accessible to everyone who may benefit from them."

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to info@thehort.org





The Kitchen Gardener’s Handbook
A Talk with Jennifer Bartley
Thursday, April 5, 2012



“American Potager Gardening”
No longer content with separating the plants they grow to eat and the plants they grow for beauty, American gardeners are discovering the French method of incorporating both edibles and ornamentals into their home landscapes. Jennifer Bartley makes it easy by showing how a well-designed landscape can yield both bounty for the table and beauty for the soul.

Structured by season, Bartley's friendly advice gives you the tools you need to build and maintain a kitchen garden. Whether she's sharing tips on planting radishes in spring, harvesting tomatoes in summer, or pruning perennials in winter, she’ll teach you how to easily incorporate ornamentals and edibles into your garden design and how to organize your monthly garden chores. Come and learn how you can have it all — the freshness of fruits and vegetables and the beauty and simplicity of hand-picked bouquets.

Jennifer Bartley runs a landscape architecture firm founded with the belief that gardens can be beautiful, productive and restorative.  Inspired by the grand potagers of France, Jennifer Bartley passionately communicates how to create these edible havens in our own back yards. She is the author of Designing the New Kitchen Garden and The Kitchen Gardener's Handbook. Learn more at americanpotager.com.

All photographs and illustrations by Jennifer Bartley

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to info@thehort.org







Botanical Hand Salves and Lip Balms
A Workshop with Hilda Krus
Thursday, March 22, 2012



Many of the plants that we know and interact with every day have been used for their healing properties for centuries.  Aside from traditional herbal medicine, many plant-based materials can be easily converted into healing balms and salves to support healthy skin.  Shea butter, a natural fat derived from the shea nut, is a wonderful moisturizer; lavender, in addition to its wonderful fragrance, is touted for its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; rose hips are celebrated for their ability to deliver skin-nourishing vitamins as well as their high antioxidant levels.  And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Please join us for an evening of learning more about these wonderful herbal traditions and how we can use simple techniques to harness their benefits through homemade hand salves and lip balms.  Hilda Krus, Director of the GreenHouse Program at the Horticultural Society will teach us everything we need to know using an array of organic, dried herbs and botanical materials, including calendula, lavender, rose hip seed oil, shea butter, mango butter and olive oil.  Come prepared to learn and dig into these rich traditions, and return home with your own healing salves, as well as the knowledge to recreate them for years to come.

Hilda Krus is a registered Horticultural Therapist and graduated social worker and is the Director of The Hort’s GreenHouse Program on Rikers Island. There, she provides male and female students with class room horticultural training, year round hands-on experience in horticulture and ongoing horticultural therapy, encouraging the men and women to grow new hope and dare to change after their release. Hilda grows a wide range of ornamental, aromatic and edible plants on the island, many of which she harvests and uses to teach her students to make botanical hand salves and lip balms.

All materials included
NOTE: Classes must be paid in full at the time of registration. A full refund will be given with a 5 business day notice only or if the workshop is cancelled.

Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $20; Non-members $30

This workshop is FULL. Thank you to everyone who registered!







The Edible Front Yard
A Talk with Ivette Soler
Wednesday, March 21, 2012



“Gorgeous Edible Gardens”
Garden designer/writer Ivette Soler, aka “The Germinatrix,” wants us to re-think our relationship to our forward-facing green spaces—specifically, she wants us to rid ourselves of useless front lawns or green patches and replace them with well-designed gardens filled with the most ornamental varieties of vegetables, fruits, herbs, and edible flowers.

Soler teaches you all the tricks for laying out the design and choosing the best plants. She’ll give clear instructions for a bounty of exciting projects like a fragrant carpet of herbs, a trellis privacy screen using runner beans, and an eye-catching raised bed that turns your "hell strip" into a little patch of paradise. From the curb or sidewalk right up to your front door, the information in this class will include everything you need to have beautiful landscaping—and eat it too!

Ivette Soler is a garden designer and writer living in Los Angeles, California. Her plant design work for Elysian Landscapes, and her own personal garden, has appeared in magazines such as Metropolitan Home, Sunset, and House & Garden. She is the author of The Edible Front Yard, and her garden writing has been featured in numerous magazines. Ivette was also the resident gardening expert on NBC's The Bonnie Hunt Show.

Her popular gardening blog, The Germinatrix, originated in 2006 as a part of Domino magazine’s website; since 2009, Ivette's blog has been thriving independently. Learn more at thegerminatrix.com.

All photographs by Ann Summa

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to info@thehort.org







In Praise of Chickens
A Talk with Jane Smith
Wednesday, March 7, 2012



Fascinated by chickens?  You are in good company, from Aristotle to Darwin to Harriet Beecher Stowe.  Join us as Jane S. Smith, author of In Praise of Chickens, explores centuries of poultry lore gathered from scientists, artists, poets, philosophers, breeders, feather fanciers, and egg-coddlers through the ages.

Ever wonder if chickens have their very own vocabulary, how to get hens to lay in winter, or why churches have weathervanes shaped like roosters?  Can't remember which royal court it was where the ladies hatched eggs in their bosoms?  Whether you want the earliest recorded instructions on how to hypnotize a chicken, or nineteenth-century tips on sending a year's supply of fresh eggs to your child in college, you'll find the answer here, along with portraits of prize-winning breeds both fierce and fluffy.

Jane S. Smith writes about the intersection of natural history, science, business, and popular taste.  Recipient of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and, most recently, the Caroline Bancroft Prize for Western American History (for The Garden of Invention: Luther Burbank and the Business of Breeding Plants), she is a member of the History Department at Northwestern University.  She lives in Chicago, where she works in a very small room with a very large window.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
FREE

RSVP to info@thehort.org




Designing a Living City
A City Soft Walks Charrette
Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Facilitated by:
Transdisciplinary Design MFA students from Parsons the New School for Design



New York City has over 6,000 sidewalk sheds that total over 1 million linear feet of enclosed sidewalk area. Installed from a month to as long as ten years, these tunnels of steel scaffolding are an ideal opportunity to transform an otherwise gray infrastructure into one with myriad benefits. How might these structures contribute to storm water management, reduced heat island effect, and an improved pedestrian experience?

Join us for a collaborative design workshop to reimagine sidewalk sheds. How might these utilitarian scaffolding structures that line the streets of New York City serve a multiplicity of functions? Can they be a community asset rather than an eyesore? In this workshop we will prototype ideas to green grey infrastructure. Learn about native plant species, urban art initiatives, and community programming.

We welcome experts and students engaged in landscape architecture, urban policy, construction management and related disciplines to join in and unearth possibilities.

4:00 pm–8:00 pm
Free (workshop capacity is 20 people, reserve your spot soon!)
RSVP to info@citysoftwalks.com
For more information visit citysoftwalks.com




Writing the Garden: A Literary Conversation across Two Centuries
A Lecture by Elizabeth Barlow Rogers
Wednesday, February 29, 2012



Focusing on gardeners’ words about the art of gardening, Writing the Garden: A Literary Conversation Across Two Centuries by landscape historian Elizabeth Barlow Rogers brings together a diverse array of authors. For the most part they are not professional landscape designers or how-to horticulturists but rather hands-on gardeners who write with their own gardens in full view. Ranging in time and place from Enlightenment France to modern-day New York City, they invite the reader into the natural world of soil and flowers, insects and sun, pride and frustration.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Thomas Jefferson, Henry David Thoreau, Gertrude Jekyll, Andrew Jackson Downing, Celia Thaxter, Vita Sackville-West, Russell Page, Rosemary Verey, Hugh Johnson, Paula Deitz, Lynden Miller, and Michael Pollan are among the fifty writers whose works are excerpted and discussed by Rogers.

Elizabeth Barlow Rogers is the president of the Foundation for Landscape Studies. A native of San Antonio, Texas, she earned a bachelor’s degree in art history from Wellesley College and a master’s degree in city planning from Yale University.

A resident of New York City since 1964, Rogers was the first person to hold the title of Central Park Administrator, a New York City Department of Parks & Recreation position created by Mayor Edward I. Koch in 1979. She was the founding president of the Central Park Conservancy, the public-private partnership created in 1980 to bring citizen support to the restoration and renewed management of Central Park. She served in both positions until 1996.

Subsequent to guiding Central Park’s restoration and instituting a new management structure during the Conservancy’s first fifteen years, Rogers resumed her career as teacher, lecturer, and writer on the subject of place. At the same time, she has maintained her commitment to the preservation of living landscapes through good design and sound management practices.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
FREE

RSVP to info@thehort.org




The Hort Celebrates Black History Month
Food is Medicine
A Lecture with Queen Afua
Friday, February 24, 2012



Queen Afua is a pioneer and landmark figure in holistic healing and research. The author of several seminal works on healing and women’s issues, Queen Afua will share key insights into the role food plays in sustaining and supporting vital health, with a special emphasis on the devastating and pandemic health problems facing communities of color. Food is Medicine will provide a blue print for a lifestyle that emphasizes nutrition as a key tool in creating and maintaining optimal health for people of color and all communities in a country beset by a host of lifestyle-induced disease.

For over 37 years, Queen Afua has been revered as a community scientist/healer/health activist, within Brooklyn, New York, and abroad, deeming success stories from around the world praising her work. She has traveled through Europe, the Caribbean’s, Bahamas, Africa, and North America spreading her wellness message and well-known herbal supplements.

Her institute, Queen Afua Wellness Institute, has been located and operating within the very community she grew up in, servicing, and providing wellness programs for over half a million people for the past 15 years. Her restorative collection of herbal formulas have been clinically approved and considered household brands by her loyal customers and clients.

Through such a large response from Women following her for years, that have cried out about suffering from ‘womb’ issues, she was inspired to introduce stories of inspiration through her latest book, ‘Overcoming an Angry Vagina; the journey to womb wellness’. The book expresses the point that many of us know about fighting off disease in general, but not about the connection between the womb, good health, and relationship success.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Suggested donation of $15 (Hort members) and $20 (Non-members)

Register online or email info@thehort.org




The Hort Celebrates Black History Month
Three Black Chicks Digging Deep
with Angela Davis, Shatia Jackson, and Chido Tsemunhu
Thursday, February 23, 2012



Three powerful, passionate, active black women discuss topics usually avoided, but of great importance when seen against the escalating crisis in our ecological, economic and energy systems.  What role does the legacy of slavery and share cropping play in the lack of involvement in urban farming and community gardening in Black Communities? Why are so few Blacks visible in the sustainability and food movements?  Facing a pandemic health crisis, how can we activate our communities? These and other questions will be addressed by a powerful panel and a night that promises lively discussion, and unique insights.

Angela Davis is the Community Food Education Coordinator for Just Food, a New York City based nonprofit organization, that works to unite local farms and city residents of all economic backgrounds with fresh, seasonal, sustainably grown food.   Angela is a holistic health coach, certified healing foods specialist, and food justice activist. She also serves as chapter leader of the Jersey City Chapter of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a national nonprofit nutrition education foundation that is dedicated to restoring nutrient-dense foods to the human diet through education, research and activism.  Angela is a graduate of the Institute for Integrative Nutrition in New York City. She has a Master of Education degree from the George Washington University and a Bachelor of Arts from Oberlin College. She is a 2009 Environmental Leadership Program Fellow.

Shatia Jackson is a Bedstuy native and resides there with her fiancé and young son. Her family has lived in the 1899 Brownstone for five generations and has deep roots to the neighborhood and community. She has a passionate desire to be instrumental in implementing change in ways that will force us to re evaluate our priorities and our ambitions.  She wants to increase participation in agricultural independence and to raise the health standards of those living in Bedstuy while maintaining the diversity and integrity of the community. She, along with Kristen Bonardi Rapp, founded the “462 Halsey Community Garden” in September 2011 with a goal of reaching as many people as possible with messages and actions toward changing and empowering our communities.  She loves baking, craft projects, reading, pets and spending quality time with her family.

Chido Tsemunhu is a Brooklyn resident living in BedStuy. She spent much of her youth in Zimbabwe before moving to the U.S.  She currently works in the health communications industry and nurtures a growing interest and commitment to all things sustainable and self-sufficiency.  Chido is a member of Brooklyn Permaculture, a diverse group of Brooklynites united by a fervent commitment to mobilize and empower Brooklyn communities to create a new sustainable way of life in the urban environment.  An avid reader and dog lover, Chido is a firm believer in breakfast, hugs and smiling.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
FREE

RSVP to info@thehort.org




Green Walls 101: Systems Overview and Design
Led by Melissa Daniels
Thursday, February 23, 2012



This updated version of our Green Walls 101: Introduction to Systems and Design course discusses design and construction best practices for green facades and living walls, as well as the latest research findings on the environmental benefits of these technologies.

Melissa Daniels, CNLP, has been in the nursery and landscape business for 20 years. After several years of managing Beth Tondreau Graphic Design studio and as the production manager for Habitat Magazine, Mrs. Daniels eventually moved back into the field of horticulture. Starting as an office manager, within three months Mrs. Daniels was promoted to become the sales and inventory manager for East Coast Nurseries where she helped take the company from $1M to $4M annual sales in three years time. Mrs. Daniels and Mr. Caggiano forged out together to start Plant Connection in 2002. Mrs. Daniels is a New York State Nursery & Landscape Association board director and the incoming President for the Long Island Nursery & Landscape Association. Mrs. Daniels represents the Long Island Horticultural industry on the Long Island Invasive Species Management Association review committee and the Suffolk County Water & Land Invasives Review Board. Melissa is a Certified Nursery Landscape Professional in the state of New York. Mrs. Daniels also serves on the Green Walls Committee for Green Roofs For Healthy Cities.

1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Tuition is $175 USD for Hort and GRHC members, and $199 for non-members. Tuition includes a 100-page course manual.

Click here to register through GRHC's site.




Hydroponic Gardening
A Workshop with Boswyck Farms
Wednesday, February 22, 2012



This is a time when we’re all paying more attention to what we eat.   It seems that we’re finally waking up and seeking out safe and nutritional fruits and vegetables, free of pesticides and with minimal impact on the environment they grow in.  Regardless of whether you approach gardening as a foodie, looking for delicious, fresh produce all year long, as an environmentalist, concerned about the future of our food, or simply as an enthusiastic beginner, hydroponics has a lot to offer the home gardener.  Hydroponics, or ‘agriculture without soil,’ may well be an answer to our produce prayers.

Come learn the basics of hydroponics, as a hobby and an industry, with Boswyck Farms, a hydroponic research, development, and education company based in Brooklyn.  The lecture will serve as informative introduction to the world of hydroponics, including its history, the development of hydroponic practices, and various growing methods and techniques. Following the lecture, everyone in attendance will have the chance to build a soda bottle planter: your very own passive hydroponic system made out of a reused plastic bottle. Come eager to learn, leave with a hydroponic starter garden and the knowledge to provide yourself with fresh, delicious vegetables all year long.

Boswyck Farms is a hydroponic farm in Bushwick Brooklyn. It was founded in 2008 by Lee Mandell with the idea of growing fresh food for the surrounding community. Lee is an urban farmer specializing in hydroponics with over 20 years of experience in the field.  Located in Lee’s 1,000 square foot loft, Boswyck Farms has grown into a research and development space to build and test hydroponic systems with the purpose of bringing sustainable methods of growing into the hands of people.

All participants must bring an empty 2-liter bottle. All other materials provided.

NOTE: Classes must be paid in full at the time of registration. A full refund will be given with a 5 business day notice only or if the workshop is cancelled.

Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $35; Non-members $45

Register online or email info@thehort.org







Beekeeping as a Force for Good
A Talk with Andrew Coté
Thursday, February 16, 2012



People have been harvesting honey from domesticated bees for most of recorded history, providing a reliable source of food and oftentimes income.  Recently, beekeeping has experienced something of a renaissance, bringing hives to seemingly unlikely places.  Young homesteaders and urbanites alike are contacting local beekeeping clubs to learn as much as they can about raising their own colonies, whether for personal enjoyment or profit.  Even New York City has seen an upsurge; since the Department of Health recently lifted the ban on keeping hives within the city, they’re popping up on rooftops and backyards with greater frequency.

Join us for an informative lecture with fourth generation beekeeper Andrew Coté, owner of Silvermine Apiaries of Connecticut.  You may know Andrew from his New York Honey stand at the New York City Greenmarkets, but you might not know that he is the founder of a bee-based international development nonprofit, Bees Without Borders.  Andrew and a group of dedicated apiarists teach beekeeping skills to groups of people in economically depressed areas of the globe as a means of poverty alleviation. This involves developing culturally appropriate training programs and materials for local beekeepers to increase honey yield and providing them with the opportunity to learn about and create new markets for their products.  Join us for a honey-tasting and learn the basics of beekeeping, its challenges in an urban environment, and the progress that Bees Without Borders is making worldwide, most recently in a trip to Kenya.

Andrew Coté is a former high school dropout and vagabond turned Fulbright Scholar and professor. He was born into a beekeeping family in Connecticut and is (at least) the fourth generation to carry on this ancient art. When he's not busy with hives, Andrew teaches English as a Second Language at Housatonic Community College and runs Silvermine Apiary, home of Andrew's Taste-Bud Bursting Local Wildflower Honey, as well as the development non-profit Bees Without Borders.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $5; Non-members $15

Register online or email info@thehort.org




The Hort Celebrates Black History Month
Aquaponics: The History of the Future
A Lecture by Philson Warner
Tuesday, February 14, 2012



A modern day George Washington Carver, for 45 years Philson Warner has quietly pioneered a revolution in sustainable agriculture. As the founding director of the Cornell University Hydroponics, Aquaculture, Aquaponic research and learning laboratories and one of the leading innovators, he coined the term aquaponics and catalyzed a paradigm shift in the way food is produced. Today aquaponics and hydroponics are at the forefront of technologies that hold profound promise as solutions to a world plagued by dwindling access to arable farmland, potable water and fish protein.

Join us on February 14th to celebrate the work of this agriculture pioneer. Dr. Warner will share highlights of his career and insights about the future of sustainable agricultural technology.

Philson A. A. Warner is the Founding Director of the Cornell University Coop Ext (CUCE)., NYC Hydroponics, Aquaculture, Aquaponics Applied Research,Teaching and Demonstration Learning Labs, and is the Coordinator of Science, Technology and Sustainable Agriculture at CUCE, NYC.
Over the past 35 years he has invented and developed the following technologies: The NDFT Hydroponics Technology; BHS Aquaculture Technology; NDFT/BHS Aquaponics Technology and several others. He is also the major author of the following publications: “Grow With The Flow,” “Hydroponics Learning Model,” and is the author of several other publications such as: “Aquaponics Techniques,” “Hydroponic Gardening In The Home,” “Basic Plant Propagation Techniques,” and co-author of “New York Aquaculture (Status, Constraints and Opportunities).” He has also developed programs in Science and Technology for regular public school systems, afterschool and summer programs through large partnerships with the New York City Department Of Education School System (NYCDOE), New York City Department of Youth and Community Development NYCDYCD), the Police Athletic League (PAL), NYC GreenThumb and NYC Housing Authority Garden Program to name a few. His professional background is as follow: Tropical, International and Temperate Agriculture and Horticulture; Medical Micro Biology and Medical Parasitological; Public Administration and Community Health.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
FREE

RSVP to info@thehort.org







Manhattan Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society Meeting
Tweeting the Alps or Texting Farrer, a Century Later
A Talk with Matt Mattus
Monday, February 13, 2012

The Bernese Oberland is surely one of the most beautiful regions of Switzerland, and of course it is home to the most iconic alpine plants, which we all love to grow, but if you haven’t seen the photos of Matt Mattus on his blog or in his digital publication Plant Society Magazine, you are in for a treat. Matt is going to share with us his most favorite images from his summer trips to Switzerland, Austria, and the Dolomites of Italy. Better yet, Matt does all of this botanizing completely wired, with a laptop strapped to his back, documenting every detail and sharing it on his blog each night. With an artist’s eye and a scientist’s curiosity, Matt will inspire you to learn more about how new technology is changing everything. If you are still grousing about the loss of Ektachrome, then this talk is for you. A hundred years after Reginald Farrer famously introduced the world to this most well-known of alpine environments, Matt will share how he rediscovers it in the new millennium by using Facebook, texting, iPads, laptops, and digital technology to document his discoveries and observations and how they have opened all sorts of new possibilities for plant lovers.

Talk starts at 6:00pm
Hort/NARGS members FREE
For more information, please email ManhattanNARGS@verizon.net
Or visit www.mcnargs.org




The Hort Celebrates Black History Month
Emancipation Oaks:
Seeing the African-American History of a New York Landscape

with Morgan Powell, Landscape Designer
Tuesday, February 7, 2012



Hampton University in Virginia began like the NY Stock Exchange, under a tree in a simpler time.  One Live Oak (Quercus virginiana) at Hampton has come to signify that Historically Black College—however a whole urban forest in New York City's northernmost borough has shaded sites of many professional and lay ecologists and civic builders whose work and lives have remained obscure until now. 

Come see and hear over three hundred and fifty years of local African-American history—historic sites, epochal events and noteworthy people—as it has unfolded beneath a dynamic arboreal canopy.

Morgan Powell is a Landscape Designer who has written about public open spaces from Monaco's succulent garden to the Stuyvesant Cove Park in Manhattan.  His earlier work on this subject includes:

• 2004  Walking tour: Images of the Bronx in the Metropolitan Museum of Art
• 2004  NY Open Space Coalition health walk from Woodlawn Cemetery to the Bronx Zoo
• 2005  Multi-modal tour of Bronx River Architecture and Public Art for teen-agers
• 2011  Wrote the West Farms Rapids park historical sign for the Department of Parks and Recreation of the City of New York
• 2011 Power Point talk for the New York Public Library, 100 Golden Moments: the Bronx River's African-American Heritage
• 2011  Walking tour of the Bronx River's African-American Heritage

Doors open at 6pm; presentation starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $5; Non-members $15

Register online or email info@thehort.org





The Transition Activist Initiative
with Charles Eisenstein
Sunday, February 5, 2012


Join acclaimed author-teacher, Charles Eisenstein, in a day-long intensive aimed to revolutionize your effectiveness as a leader, healer, and/or social activist in times of rapid change. Our society is entering a time of profound transition. Crises in the economy, the ecosystem, health, education, water, energy, and more are propelling our civilization toward a radically different way of living on planet earth. Such conditions call for a new kind of leader, and even a whole new paradigm of leadership. At stake are the deep questions: "Who are we?" "What are we here to create?" "What is the role of humanity on earth, and how may I contribute to it?"

Charles Eisenstein is the author of Sacred Economics and The Ascent of Humanity. A faculty member of Goddard College, he writes and speaks on themes of transition, money, and cultural evolution. His work may be found on charleseisenstein.net.

In this gathering we will explore, in concept and in practice:
• Our unique historical moment: from separation to connection.
• The dynamics of transition (personal, organizational, planetary).
• Leadership independent of power structures and hierarchies.
• The necessity for miracles, and how to access them.
• What does leadership mean in a non-hierarchical setting?
• A leader: "One who holds the story of what-is-to-be."
• A leader: "One who creates opportunities for others to express their gifts."


10am – 4pm
Suggested registration for workshop: $40
(you will have the opportunity to pay in advance or gift Charles the day of the workshop)

Click here to register on NYCharities.org




The Hort Celebrates Black History Month
African Herbal Traditions: The Diaspora and Beyond
A Talk with Brandon Rosser
Friday, February 3, 2012



Professor Rosser, through first-hand experience as a traditional healer and spiritual guide, shares the history of traditional herbalism and herbal medicine and its importance to traditional African cultures in Africa and throughout the diaspora.

Brandon Rosser is a former professor of African and African American Studies, as well as Africana Folklore. He has had the pleasure of teaching at various institutions, including New York City College of Technology, Borough of Manhattan Community College, Passaic County Community College, and Nassau Community College. Mr. Rosser has also lectured at the City University School of Law, Columbia University, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, and Syracuse University. Additionally, he has contributed articles to numerous publications, and conducted radio interviews on WBAI, a prominent public radio station in New York City. Furthermore, he has made several television appearances on the Public Broadcast Service Network. Currently, Mr. Rosser is a practicing herbalist and a priest of the Congo/Lukumi tradition.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Free

RSVP to info@thehort.org





16th Annual Plant‐O‐Rama
A Trade Show and Symposium for Horticulture Professionals
Tuesday, January 31, 2012


Join the Hort at the 16th Annual Plant-O-Rama and connect to over 50 commercial and nonprofit exhibitors representing specialty nurseries, wholesale growers, horticultural suppliers, greening organizations and public gardens from NYC and the tri-state region.

Author Dr. Michael A. Dirr will be the keynote speaker this year. Dr. Dirr is the author of the brand new book Dirr’s Encyclopedia of Trees & Shrubs, the most comprehensive, best-illustrated, and most authoritative reference to trees and shrubs for gardens and landscapes.

9am – 4pm
Palm House Exhibit Hall at Brooklyn Botanic Garden
For more information about this event, click here.






Manhattan Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society Meeting
Throwing Pots and Raising Dahlias: My Life in a Connecticut Garden
A Talk with Frances Palmer
Monday, January 23, 2012

Frances Palmer discusses her work, her process and how botanical interests influence the classic, one-of-a-kind vases and bowls that she hand-throws for a wide array of clients. Each piece is a perfect vessel for the myriad dahlias and other flowers lovingly grown in the spectacular, organic cutting garden adjacent to her equally gorgeous windowed studio. Frances will describe the profound connection between her work and her garden, as well as the dynamic relationship between these outdoor and indoor spaces.

Frances Palmer's work has been featured in many publications, from HOUSE & GARDEN and VOGUE, to THE NEW YORK TIMES and NEW YORK MAGAZINE. Among the many distinguished sites where her work may be found is the Philip Johnson Glass House, for which she created a collection of white porcelain bisque vases in 2010, and an ongoing, exclusive group of pots that are for sale in the Design Shop and Catalog of the Neue Gallery, NYC.

Talk starts at 6:00pm
Hort/NARGS members FREE
For more information, please email ManhattanNARGS@verizon.net
Or visit www.mcnargs.org




Herb Terrarium Workshop
Thursday, January 19, 2012



Although it’s handy to pick up a package of fresh herbs at the store, it’s even nicer to have them on hand at your back door, terrace, or even on your windowsill. As Americans are more concerned about where their food comes from, gardening is now the ‘new’ obsession. Growing herbs in open or closed terrariums is rather simple, and learning how to match the right plant with the right container becomes second nature. Join us as we discover the steps to creating a successful and productive herb garden that will last you even through winter.

A terrarium is the perfect way to jump-start your herb garden indoors as a winter project.  We will cover the basics of herb gardening in terrariums, including proper soil, plant options, water and nutrient needs, container choices, and harvesting. Whether you’re planting herbs for culinary use, attractive foliage and blooms, or fragrance, there are herbs to satisfy everyone’s yen.

All materials included, be sure to bring something to carry your terrarium home. Experienced and novice gardeners welcomed!

Space is limited,
RSVP required by Monday, January 16

Doors open at 6pm; Workshop starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $50; Non-members $75 (Materials included)

Register online or email info@thehort.org






Manhattan Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society Meeting
The Alpine Garden in Fort Tryon Park
A Talk with Kean Teck Eng
Monday, December 12, 2011

Kean Eng grew up in a family with a farming background in Malaysia. He was trained as an agronomist in the tropics and graduated with a Bachelors (Honors) Degree in Agricultural Science from Putra University in Malaysia. He worked in food crop production and in the floriculture industry focusing on post-harvest physiology to extend the shelf life of cut flowers for export. He also worked for Dupont on field trials of warm temperate crops and ornamental plants in high altitude cultivation. In New York, he was an intern at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden where he obtained his Certificate in Horticulture. He is currently working in the Alpine Garden in Fort Tryon Park with the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation, where he has been since 2008.

His topic, “Restoring the Alpine Garden at Fort Tryon Park” will address the history of the garden, originally designed by the Olmsted Brothers, changes effected since 1935, and challenges presented in the restoration work he’s spearheading.

Talk starts at 6:00pm
Hort/NARGS members FREE
For more information, please email ManhattanNARGS@verizon.net
Or visit www.mcnargs.org




Homegrown

Soap Making
A Workshop with Tara and Jeff of Meow Meow Tweet
Thursday, December 8, 2011


Botanically-derived essential oils have been used in soap-making for centuries, either to evoke a specific scent of a much-loved plant or a healing property touted by holistic medicine. Cold process soap-making is a simple way to capture the benefits of these botanicals in your own home.

Discover the fun and creativity of cold process soap-making with Tara and Jeff of Meow Meow Tweet. They'll teach you how to design and formulate your own recipe, the proper use and storage of lye, basic properties of oils used for soap making, essential oils, natural additives and botanicals, coloring, molding and curing, plus share helpful hints and favorite supply sources. We’ll divide up what’s made during the class, and everyone in attendance will take home their own hand-made soap.

Supplies for students to bring:
• Rubber gloves (the dishwashing kind)
• Eye protection
• Safety mask that covers mouth and nose
• Three containers for your soap (paper cups, empty half-gallon milk or juice paper carton with the top cut off and washed thoroughly, or Tupperware)

All of Meow Meow Tweet’s soaps are carefully crafted to evoke a certain quality or healthful property. They use only essential oils and organic, all-natural ingredients. Each bar is sealed with a hemp paper wrapper and hand-stamped with one of their drawings.

All materials included.
Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm

Hort members $20; Non-members $25

THIS WORKSHOP IS CURRENTLY FULL.
Please contact info@thehort.org to be added to the waitlist.






Grisaille Technique in Botanical Painting
A Workshop with Wendy Hollender
Monday, November 21, 2011


Join botanical artist, instructor, and author Wendy Hollender to learn the techniques outlined in her new book Botanical Drawing in Color: A Basic Guide to Mastering Realistic Form and Naturalistic Color (Random House).  Students will learn how to use a grisaille technique for undertones in a neutral color and then how to layer color on top to create depth, using watercolor and watercolor pencils in combination with dry colored pencils. This technique is very immediate and materials are simple, allowing the artist to work easily in multiple locations and it is especially useful for work in the field.

Wendy Hollender began a career in botanical illustration after completing a certificate at the New York Botanical Garden in 1998.  Previously a home furnishing textile designer, she started WH Art & Design, using her botanical artwork in various products.  Her work was included in the 13th International Exhibition at Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, and in exhibitions at the Royal Botanical Garden, Kew and the Smithsonian National Museum for Natural History.  Hollender’s illustrations have been published in the New York Times, Oprah Magazine, and this October issue of Real Simple magazine.

Hollender’s paintings, Arctium minus (Burdock), and Pseudobombax ellipticum (Shaving Brush Tree), are featured in The 14th Annual International Juried Botanical Art Exhibition, currently on view through November 23.


SOLD OUTplease call 212.757.0915 X121 to be added to the wait list.
Morning session: 10am to 1pm
Afternoon session: 2pm to 5pm
Click here to view a materials list (PDF)




Year-End Celebration & Reception
with special guests from Dekalb Market & Farm
Wednesday, November 16, 2011


Join us as we celebrate another successful year at The Hort with a cocktail reception for our members, friends, and partners. Local treats will be provided by special guests from Dekalb Market & Farm.

Enjoy a drink with our staff and growing community of supporters, and learn about our accomplishments from the past year, including: the piloting of our new educational program for middle school adolescents, GreenTween at MS 57 and MS 171 in East Harlem; the remediation and restoration of the DEEL Community Garden in Harlem; and the installation of a new learning garden at PS 84 in Astoria, featuring a living stormwater management system.  We’ve also launched a fresh new look, with a newly designed logo, revamped website, and a revised mission statement.

The reception will feature seasonal refreshments and treats created by vendors and farmers from the Dekalb Market & Farm.  Dekalb Market is a new community destination in Downtown Brooklyn.  Housed in a collection of salvaged shipping containers, the project brings together NYC’s creative entrepreneurs and community organizations in a unique setting that includes a farm, an events venue, and a collection of eateries and work-sell spaces.

Dekalb Farm is a platform for members of NYC’s urban agricultural community to design and implement a unique educational experience within a working garden. The gardens include a permaculture garden by Brooklyn Grange, an educational garden by  Family Cook Productions, a grassroots community plot by Kujichagulia, a nutrient-dense organic plot by Newton Farm Collective, and a research garden by artist-collective and education center, 3rd Ward.

5:30pm | Annual Meeting
(members only)

6:15pm | Erika Brenner
, Farm Coordinator at the Dekalb Farm
A brief presentation on the history, development, and operations of the Dekalb Market & Farm.

6:30pm | Special live performance by Teen Battle Chefs
Using seasonal produce, locally grown at Dekalb Farm, students from this Family Cook Productions program will prepare their own recipes to be served throughout the evening.

7:00 - 8:30pm | Cocktail Reception
Enjoy seasonal refreshments and treats with The Hort and our special guests from Dekalb Market & Farm.

RSVP to membership@thehort.org






Green Infrastructure: Policies, Performance and Projects
Friday, November 11, 2011


This half-day course provides attendees with a review of various vegetative technologies in urban areas (i.e. green walls, green roofs, urban forests, rain gardens), presents the latest research on their many performance benefits, and showcases a variety of leading edge policy and program developments in cities such as Chicago, Seattle, New York and Toronto that support the greening of our cities. Ideal for policy makers and other advocates of urban greenery. Includes a 250-page course manual.

1PM-5PM
Hort members $175 (use discount code "HSNYmember"); Non-members $225

Click here to register through GRHC's site.
Space is limited. Reserve your seat today.

This course is approved by USGBC for 3.5 GBCI CE Hours for LEED Professionals. AIA and ASLA members can earn 3.5 continuing education credits for participating. GRPs can earn 3.5 CEUs.





Homegrown

Homebrewed Beer
A Workshop with Claire Briguglio and Sam Adels
Wednesday, November 9, 2011


Beer is undergoing a renaissance in the United States. An industry once controlled by six corporations is now dotted with thoughtfully and locally crafted beers in an ever-widening array. Simply put, Americans are rediscovering their centuries-old brewing traditions.

In the mid 1880’s, there were over 4,000 breweries in the U.S. producing 9 million barrels of beer each year. By the 1920’s Prohibition dismantled this diversity. Fortunately, a small band of adventurous brewers changed all of this. Home brewers transformed their personal brewing operations into microbreweries as they discovered that Americans love craft beer.

Before it was produced for the public, much of the craft beer you enjoy had a humble beginning on the kitchen stove. Home brewing not only allows you to control the quality of the beer, but also to customize its flavor with an almost unending choice of natural ingredients.

Join us as we welcome award winning home brewers, Claire Briguglio and Sam Adels, as they demonstrate how simple creating and brewing your own beer can be. Experience for yourself the joys and satisfaction of home brewing as they explain the brewing process and offer a sampling of their handcrafted beers.

All materials included.
Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm

Hort members $15; Non-members $20

Register online or RSVP to info@thehort.org

NOTE: Space is limited. Advance registration required.






Prickly Subjects
A Botanical Illustration Workshop with John Pastoriza-Piñol
Thursday, November 3, 2011


Join botanical artist John Pastoriza-Piñol—visiting from Australia!—for a class that explores the techniques for achieving intricate and precise edges in your paintings.  Whether your subject is dried flowers or the autumn’s harvest, properly protectingyour drawing with masking fluid before laying down your watercolor washes is an invaluable process that ensures crisp, detailed results.  With these tools, your paintings can be brought to a new level of realism and accuracy.  Students should have skills in drawing and watercolor.

John Pastoriza-Piñol received a doctorate in botany from University of Vigo, Spain. His work is in numerous public and private collections around the world, including: Hunt Institute; Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; State Collection at Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne; RMIT University; and the Collection of Alisa and Isaac M. Sutton.  He is the recipient of many awards and recognitions, including a commission for the Highgrove Florilegium through the Prince of Wales’s Charitable Foundation.  Pastoriza-Piñol currently teaches at the Geelong Botanic Gardens and is represented by Nellie Castan Gallery in South Yarra. For more information, please visit www.botanique-art.com.

Pastoriza-Piñol’s painting, Castanea sativa (Spanish Sweet Chestnut), is featured in The 14th Annual International Juried Botanical Art Exhibition, currently on view through November 23.

Morning session: 10am to 1pm
Afternoon session: 2pm to 5pm
Course fee (for both sessions):
Hort members $115; Non-members $150
Click here to view a materials list (PDF)






An Elegant Wilderness:
Great Camps and Grand Lodges of the Adirondacks, 1855-1935

By Gladys Montgomery
Wednesday, November 2, 2011


An Elegant Wilderness: Great Camps and Grand Lodges of the Adirondacks, 1855-1935, by Gladys Montgomery, recounts the story of the private retreats of the Gilded Age industrial rich who traveled north from New York City to experience wilderness. Light-years away from other upscale resorts, the Adirondacks was a place where constricting social proprieties were relaxed; women shed their corsets to hike, hunt, fish, and play tennis; and children learned to appreciate the great outdoors. Gladys Montgomery illustrates her talk with dozens of rare evocative photographs of rustic homes, idyllic lakes, and recreational pastimes.

Gladys Montgomery is an award-winning writer and editor. The author of five books and the founding editor of Berkshire Living Home + Garden, she has penned more than 200 magazine features about architecture, design, antiques, and historic buildings, which have appeared in regional, national, and international publications.

Doors open at 6pm; Lecture starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $10; Non-members $15

Register online or RSVP to info@thehort.org








Homegrown

Make Your Own Pickles and Relishes
A Workshop with Robert Schaeffer of Divine Brine
Wednesday, October 19, 2011


Pickling originally came about as a method of preserving food from the harvest, but has since evolved into a culinary art.  From traditional dills to mouth-watering watermelon rinds, pickling has become an incredible diverse craft, one that lends itself well to the do-it-yourself ethos.

Please join us as Robert Schaeffer of Divine Brine Foods teaches us to bring this delicious skill into our own kitchens.  Robert will talk about the history and basics of pickles, relishes and chutneys, and give a hands-on demonstration of each.  Everyone will have the opportunity to create their own batch of Robert’s delicious Hot Bread and Butters, Classic Cucumber Relish and Fall Tomato Chutney.  Robert is a strong believer in using seasonal, local produce, and founded his business on one principle: “we have to get back to the garden.” 

After attending Hunter College, Chef Robert Schaeffer began his career as an apprentice and later full-time chef at the 21 Club in New York City.  He went on to work for the notable White House Chef Pierre Chambrin and later Hilton Hotels.  Robert later opened several restaurants around the country, including the posh venue Portfolio, located in the Hamptons.  After a successful catering career, he founded Divine Brine in 2010.

All materials included.
Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm

Hort members $15; Non-members $20

Register online or RSVP to info@thehort.org

NOTE: Space is limited. Advance registration required.






Exploring the Science of Botanical Art
A Drawing Workshop with Dick Rauh
Monday, October 17, 2011


Join experienced botanical artist and former ASBA juror, Dick Rauh, for a class that explores the science behind the flowers we all love to paint. For his own work, Rauh focuses on flowers, dry fruits, and other remnants of out-of-season natives, magnifying them to highlight their botanical structure and composition.  Participants of the class will learn the vocabulary and processes underlying the reproductive functions and life cycles of flowering plants.  Using magnifying glasses to examine their subject, students will identify and transcribe the special characteristics that distinguish one plant from another and scale the minute details of the plants into beautiful botanical drawings.

Dick Rauh came to botanical painting after a career in motion picture special effects.  After completing a certificate program in Botanical Art at the New York Botanical Gardens, Rauh received a doctorate degree in Plant Sciences at the City University of New York in 2001, and is currently a fellow of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Florilegium and President of the ASBA Board of Directors.  His exceptional technique has earned him awards at the 2006 Royal Horticultural Society Flower Show in London, as well as inclusion in notable collections such as the Lindley Library, London; New York State Museum, Albany; and the Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, Pittsburgh, PA. 

Rauh’s painting, Paeonia sp. (Peony Follicles), is featured in The 14th Annual International Juried Botanical Art Exhibition, currently on view through November 23.

Morning session: 10am to 1pm
Afternoon session: 2pm to 5pm
Course fee (for both sessions):
Hort members $115; Non-members $150
Register online or call 212.757.0915 (space is limited)
Click here to view a materials list (PDF)




Celebrate openhousenewyork with The Hort
Saturday, October 15, 2011


The Horticultural Society of New York, designed by Marpillero Pollak Architects, is an oasis tucked between Times Square and Penn Station. Our headquarters, which houses our library, gallery, and offices, is an open, light-filled space rich with plant life. Join us for special weekend hours this Saturday for America's largest architecture and design event, openhousenewyork weekend. Architect Linda Pollak will give a special tour at 1pm.  Other activities and events are listed below.

Linda Pollak, AIA, Affil. ASLA, is a principal of Marpillero Pollak Architects (MPA), a member of the NYC Design + Construction Excellence Program. MPA’s current NYC public projects include Elmhurst Branch Library, Queens Plaza, and New Stapleton Waterfront. MPA designed the Hort's home in 2006, and collaborated with their GreenBranches program in 2006-8 to design and implement learning gardens for three branch libraries in Brooklyn and Queens. Pollak’s research on architecture and urban landscape has been recognized with grants and fellowships from the American Academy in Rome, National Endowment for the Arts, New York State Council on the Arts, New York Foundation for the Arts, and the Graham Foundation, among others. She is co-author, with Anita Berrizbeitia, of Inside Outside: Between Architecture and Landscape.

openhousenewyork Schedule
11am-5pm | Free and open to the public
—Our gallery and library will be open with special hours for the event.  For those of you who can’t make it during the week, this is a great chance to come see our current exhibition, check out our library (and book sale), and enjoy one of the fun activities listed below.

All day | Pumpkin Carving—Celebrate the harvest by carving pumpkins grown in the Hudson Valley.

All day | Make Your Own Tea—Craft your own organic herbal blend from seasonal plants and flowers.

12pm | Home-brewed Beer—Come and sample the season’s best beers, including a Pumpkin Ale, Apple Ale, and an Indian Brown Ale, handcrafted by Brooklyn home brewers.

1pm | Tour of The Hort with Architect Linda Pollak

3pm | Gallery Tour—Join us for a rare opportunity to view the 14th Annual International Juried Botanical Art Exhibition on a guided tour with our curator Chris Murtha.








Houses of the Berkshires, 1870-1930
By Richard S. Jackson and Cornelia Brooke Gilder
Wednesday, October 12, 2011


The scenic hills of the Berkshires, with their beautiful lakes, clean air, and spectacular autumn foliage, have provided a respite from city life for New Yorkers and Bostonians since 19th century. In Lenox and Stockbridge and surrounding communities, grand houses were built by the nation’s leading architects. The resort area’s pioneer visitors, in the 1840s, were intellectuals: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, the actress Fanny Kemble and the painter Thomas Cole, among others. Patrons soon followed, hiring the best architects from New York and Boston, to build magnificent “cottages” and elaborate gardens and greenhouses. Houses of the Berkshires is an unmatched chronicle of this distinctive social and literary colony and now vanished way of life.

Richard S. Jackson Jr., a native of Greenwich, Connecticut and a graduate of Yale University, moved to the Berkshires in 1962. As past chairman of the Lenox Historical Commission and the Tanglewood Council, member of the Naumkeag committee, and trustee of Hancock Shaker Village he has worked to preserve several of the houses mentioned in this volume. A real estate agent specializing in historic properties, he lives in Stockbridge, Massachusetts with his wife Linda.

Cornelia Brooke Gilder spent most of her childhood in Lenox, Massachusetts, in the house her grandparents bought in 1906. A graduate of Vassar College, she continued her graduate work at the Institute for Advanced Architectural Studies in York, England. She worked at the New York State Historic Preservation Office in Albany and has since contributed to a number of exhibits and publications, including A History of Ventfort Hall (Ventfort Hall Association, 2002), Hawthorne's Lenox (2008) and Architects in Albany (2010)  She lives in Tyringham, Massachusetts, with her husband George.

Doors open at 6pm; Lecture starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $10; Non-members $15

Register online or RSVP to info@thehort.org






Homegrown

Homemade Jams, Jellies and Chutneys
A Workshop with Beth Linskey of Beth’s Farm Kitchen
Wednesday, September 28, 2011


Canning your own preserves is one of the best ways to save the flavors of a season for another day.  Beth Linskey of Beth’s Farm Kitchen has been doing exactly that, and selling the delicious products at New York City’s Greenmarkets, for over 30 years.  Beth’s commitment to her craft means that she only uses fruits and vegetables that are in season and grown locally, and her jams, jellies and chutneys are produced in small batches, so that you get the fullest, freshest flavor of the produce.  Not limiting her source of inspiration to just fruits, Beth’s creations range from spicy pepper chutneys to garlic jelly to new takes on traditional flavors, like strawberry-rhubarb jelly.

After a short lecture, Beth will demonstrate the techniques that she uses to create her delicious jams and chutneys, and teach you how to begin making your own at home.  Using only the freshest, seasonal produce from the New York City’s Greenmarkets, we will craft delicious jams or chutneys for everyone in attendance to take home. Sourcing her ingredients from local farmers, Beth will teach us to make plum jam, hot pepper jelly, a cranberry-horseradish chutney, and raspberry jelly that can easily be reproduced in your own kitchen.

Beth Linskey has been making jams and chutneys for over 30 years for customers of the New York City Greenmarkets.  A long-time advocate of locally-sourced, seasonal fruits and vegetables, Beth was recently invited to attend the Slow Food Movement’s annual conference in Turino, Italy.  Beth’s Farm Kitchen now offers over 90 flavors of jams and chutneys, and currently operates out of a farmhouse in the Hudson Valley that dates back to 1850. Beth’s new cookbook, Cooking with Jams and Chutneys: Recipes from Beth’s Farm Kitchen, will be available for purchase.  

All materials included.
Doors open at 6pm; workshop starts at 6:30pm

Hort members $15; Non-members $20

Register by Sept 28 for all 4 workshops and save:
Hort members $50; Non-members $70

Register online or RSVP to info@thehort.org

NOTE: Space is limited. Advance registration required.










The du Ponts: Houses and Gardens in the Brandywine, 1900-1951
By Maggie Lidz
Wednesday, September 14, 2011


No American family dominated a single state longer than the du Ponts of Delaware. French immigrants who arrived in America January 1, 1800, the du Ponts became a dynasty of publicity-shy entrepreneurs, engineers, horticulturists, and collectors. They built neighboring houses, gardens, and farms that spanned miles of rolling hills in Delaware’s Brandywine Valley. With their fortunes from the DuPont Company, the family pursued many passions, resulting in the exquisite art collections, spectacular botanical gardens, and libraries now enjoyed by the American public. Winterthur Museum’s estate historian Maggie Lidz captures the life of the du Ponts at home with hundreds of rare period photographs from private archives and family albums and never before published autochromes, diascopes, and Dufay color images.

Maggie Lidz is Winterthur Museum’s full-time historian. She researches, writes, and lectures about the history of Winterthur, a du Pont family estate that dates back to 1839. Although best known as a museum of American decorative arts, the horticultural and social history of Winterthur have been fertile territory for historical investigation. Lidz’s interest in Winterthur began while in the art history graduate program at the University of Delaware as a student of the eminent architectural historian Damie Stillman. She is the author of Life at Winterthur: a du Pont Family Album (2001).

Doors open at 6pm; Lecture starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $10; Non-members $15

Register by Sept 14 for all 3 lectures and save!
Hort members $25; Non-members $38

Register online or RSVP to info@thehort.org





Exploring Gardens and Green Spaces
From Connecticut to the Delaware Valley

A Talk with Magda Salvesen
Tuesday, September 13, 2011



Nestled all along the northeast corridor, a profusion of horticultural gems and designed landscapes beckons visitors, from celebrated formal parks, estates, and arboretums to less familiar-and often hard to find-gardens. This unique guidebook features 148 of them, providing readers with an incomparable resource for locating and exploring the region's green spaces-many with historic homes at their center.

Whether large, sumptuous, and impressively maintained, or modest in size, budget, and staff, all have distinctive historical, artistic, and horticultural offerings that make them well worth a trip. Mt. Cuba Center and Winterthur in Delaware, Longwood Gardens in southeastern Pennsylvania, Grounds for Sculpture and the Leonard J. Buck Garden in New Jersey, the Humes Japanese Stroll Garden on Long Island, Stonecrop Gardens and Innisfree in the Hudson Valley, and Elizabeth Park and Hollister House in Connecticut are just a few of the great gardens highlighted.

Featuring more than three hundred color photographs and twenty-nine maps, with a fund of practical information for each entry-including transportation, nearby eateries, and other sites of interest, Exploring Gardens and Green Spaces is a veritable tour guide at your fingertips, showcasing an array of gardens that await discovery.

Magda Salvesen, the curator of the Jon Schueler Estate, is a garden and art historian, and a NYC local. She has taught courses at the New York Botanical Gardens and given many talks as an independent lecturer. She currently teaches at NYU in the Art History & Urban Design and Architecture Studies department.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $5; Non-members $15

Register online or RSVP to info@thehort.org








Manhattan Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society Meeting
Plantsman's Choice: "Plants I Like and the Reasons Why"
A Talk with John Grimshaw
Monday, September 12, 2011

John Grimshaw has been interested in plants all his life, as both gardener and botanist. He holds a first class degree in botany and doctorate in African forest ecology from Oxford University. African plants remain his principal botanical interest. He is however fascinated by all plants and will attempt to grow anything in the garden. The origins of garden plants are a particular fascination and he has travelled widely to see plants growing in habitat. His first book was The Gardener’s Atlas (1998), recounting the journeys plants have made from their source to our gardens. He is co-author of the monograph Snowdrops (2002) by Matt Bishop, Aaron Davis and John Grimshaw, published by his own publishing company, Griffin Press. Between 2004-2009 he was principal author of a major book on trees introduced in the past 35 years, entitled New Trees, Recent Introductions to Cultivation, sponsored by the International Dendrology Society. It was published by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in May 2009.

He is a member of the Royal Horticultural Society’s Advisory Committee on Nomenclature and Taxonomy, and Woody Plant Committee. John is particularly proud to be an honorary elder of the Masai community of Lerang’wa, Tanzania.

Talk starts at 6:00pm
Hort/NARGS members FREE
For more information, please email ManhattanNARGS@verizon.net
Or visit www.nargs.org/manhattan




The Paper Garden
Talk and Art Demonstration with Molly Peacock
Wednesday, September 7, 2011


“At age 72, Mary Granville Pendarves Delany (1700-1788) invented a precursor of what we know as collage,” writes internationally acclaimed poet Molly Peacock in her new book, The Paper Garden, which is at once a biography of an extraordinary eighteenth-century woman and a fascinating meditation on late-life creativity.

The Paper Garden examines the life of Mrs. Delany, married off at age sixteen to a sixty-one-year-old drunken squire to improve the family fortunes.  Widowed by twenty-five, she cultivated a wide circle of influential and creative friends, including Handel and Swift.  In mid-life, she met Jonathan Swift’s friend Dean Patrick Delany, and remarried – this time, for love.  Upon her second husband’s death twenty-three years later, she picked up a pair of scissors and, at the age of seventy-two, created a new art form.   “I have invented a new way of imitating flowers,” she wrote to her niece.  Over the next decade, Mrs. Delany created an astonishing 985 botanically correct, breathtaking cut-paper flowers—so accurate that botanists still refer to them.  They are now housed in the British Museum and are referred to as the Flora Delanica.

Please join us for a talk by The Paper Garden author Molly Peacock, followed by a demonstration of the very paper-cutting technique described and celebrated in the book.

Molly Peacock is the award-winning author of five volumes of poetry, including The Second Blush. Her poems are widely anthologized in The Best of the Best American Poetry and The Oxford Book of American Poetry. Among her other works are How to Read a Poem… and Start a Poetry Circle and a memoir, Paradise, Piece by Piece. Peacock is the general series editor of The Best Canadian Poetry in English and serves as a faculty mentor at the Spalding University Brief Residency MFA Program. A transplanted New Yorker, she lives in Toronto.  For more about Molly, visit www.mollypeacock.com.

Read The New York Times book review of The Paper Garden here.

Doors open at 6pm; talk starts at 6:30pm
Admission: FREE

RSVP to info@thehort.org

All photographs © Andrew Tolson.






NY ASLA and The Hort Presents:
McGregor Coxall: An Antipodean Conversation
Wednesday, August 31, 2011


McGregor Coxall was created in 2000 when mcgregor+partners, founded in Sydney in 1988 by Adrian McGregor, was joined by Philip Coxall. A Melbourne office was established by Mark Haycox in 2011.

McGregor Coxall has completed over 300 projects, using new green technologies to solve complex urban planning and design problems, and leave a legacy of environmental, social and economic improvement. The firm’s approach aims to blur the boundaries between urban design and landscape architecture, achieving quality in the built and natural environments through a rigorous process of questioning, investigation and continuous design refinement. Projects are framed within a modernist outlook, drawing on a diverse in-house team with expertise in urban design, landscape architecture, architecture, planning, horticulture and environmental graphics. Through design excellence and strategic community and political consultation, the firm’s work often brings developers, government and community together to create mutually beneficial results.

McGregor Coxall has worked on projects in Australia, Canada, China, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Korea, the Philippines, Taiwan and the United Kingdom. It has received more than 40 awards, and was the first non-European firm to win International Landscape Architecture Practice of the Year 2009 from the prestigious Topos journal. Other honors include the 2010 World Waterfront Award for Ballast Point in Baltimore; a 2011 International Architecture Award from the European Centre for Architecture Art Design and Urban Studies, The Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and Design, and Metropolitan Arts Press Ltd.; and the top prize in Toronto’s first international AZURE awards.

With over twenty years experience as an Urban Designer and Landscape Architect, Mark Haycox manages the McGregor Coxall Melbourne Studio. Before joining the firm in 2011, Mark worked more than 10 years with Vic Urban and prior to that, with DCM. Working with many of Australia’s leading private sector developers, all levels of Government and various community organisations, Mark has delivered internationally recognised projects . His expertise lies in leading multidisciplinary teams in all aspects ofthe design process. Mark’s experience ranges from design management and preparing design briefs through to award winning landscape, public realm, environmental, civic and community based projects, commercial buildings, high and medium density residential and retail developments.

Georg Petzold is a German educated and trained Landscape Architect. Prior to relocating to Australia Georg worked on a number of large scale projects in both Germany and Austria at the design and documentation level. His work in Australia has ranged from projects in China and Taiwan to construction documentation of the external work for the competition winning National Portrait Gallery in Canberra. Georg’s design capabilities extend from macro scale down to fine grain detailing. His passion is to ensure consistency in the design process so that the end product is true to the design philosophy.

Stephanie Bailey is currently studying Landscape Architecture at the University of New South Wales. She has a keen interest in the role of urban design and landscape architecture in the development of healthier, social and ecologically sustainable public spaces. Currently, Stephanie is one of the Landscape Ambassadors for UNSW.

Doors open at 6pm
Admission: FREE

RSVP to info@thehort.org






Introduction to Rooftop Urban Agriculture
A Course with Keith Agoada and Ben Flanner
Saturday, July 9, 2011


Learn about multiple approaches to growing food on rooftops through design and maintenance principles, and case studies drawn from across North America. This course:

Instructors:
Keith Agoada, Urban-Ag
Ben Flanner, Brooklyn Grange

8:30am-12pm
Tuition is $299 and includes an 85-page course manual.

Admission for the tour and lunch at Brooklyn Grange rooftop farm is $50.
HSNY members receive a $25 discount. The discount code "hsnymember"
can be applied on the payment page to get the reduced rate.

This course qualifies for 3.5 GRP Continuing Education Units and is pending approval for continuing education credits through GBCI, AIA, RCI, ASLA, and APLD.

For more details and to register online, please click here.

Top photograph ©Recover Greenroofs, The Ledge Kitchen & Drinks



Planning Your Garden for Seed Saving
A Lecture with Shanyn Siegel
Monday, June 27, 2011

An evening with Seed Savers Exchange, presented by GreenThumb,
The Horticultural Society of New York and New York Restoration Project

If you’re interested in seed saving, understanding some basic concepts before you get started will make the process easier. Learn the difference between open-pollinated and hybrid seeds and gain an understanding of plant taxonomy, reproductive structures & pollination methods. Presenter Shanyn Siegel will also touch on isolation methods by sharing techniques for home gardeners as well as techniques used at Heritage Farm, the 890-acre home of Seed Savers Exchange.

Seed Savers Exchange is a non-profit, member- supported organization that saves & shares the heirloom seeds of our garden heritage, forming a living legacy that can be passed down through generations.

Shanyn Siegel is the curator of Seed Savers Exchange's heirloom and open-pollinated seed collections. She works with thousands of different seed varieties ranging from amaranth to watermelon.

7:00 to 8:30pm
Admission: Free

Email events@nyrp.org by June 24 to RSVP





Rooftop Gardens:
The Terraces, Conservatories and Balconies of New York

Author talk by Denise LeFrak Calicchio and Roberta Model Amon
Tuesday, June 21, 2011


Rooftop Gardens showcases some of the most extraordinary outdoor spaces in New York City. High above street level, above the noise and congestion exists a sumptuous array of gardens ranging in styles, created by urban dwellers as retreats from the daily chaos of life. This is an invitation to see these private spaces made possible by real estate insider Denise LeFrak Calicchio and Roberta Model Amon whose personal connections have provided glimpses into the various English cottage gardens, Japanese rock gardens, and artist installations that pepper the topmost plots of the city’s most prestigious addresses.

Featured landscape architects include Adele Mitchell Inc.; Greensleeves Gardens Ltd.; Barbara Britton, garden design and consulting; Gresham Lang Garden Design, LLC; Halsted Welles Associates, Inc.; Miguel Pons Landscaping, LLC; Paula Hayes; Plant Specialists; Rebecca Cole GROWs; Snap Décor, Marjorie Reed Gordon; Studio Gerard Landscape Architecture; Thomas Hays Interiors; WORKSHOP: Ken Smith Landscape Architect; and WRJ Design Associates, LLC. From the lush fantasy enclosure of a Japanese-inspired moss garden to a glass-enclosed conservatory perched atop Park Avenue in which amaryllis, paperwhite narcissus, and cyclamen grow during the winter months, Rooftop Gardens offers a sneak-peek into some of the most innovative and original idyllic urban oases New York City has to offer.

Denise LeFrak Calicchio is a member of the prominent LeFrak real estate family and a coauthor of High Rise, Low Down. Roberta Model Amon is active on committees of the Guggenheim Museum and the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

All photographs ©Norman McGrath.

12pm – 2pm
Hort members $5; Non-members $15

Register online or email info@thehort.org





Herb Container Gardens
A Workshop with George Pisegna
Thursday, June 16, 2011


Although it’s handy to pick up a package of fresh herbs at the store, it’s even nicer to have them at your back door, terrace, or even on your windowsill. As Americans are more concerned about where their food comes from, gardening is now the ‘new’ obsession. Growing herbs in pots is rather simple, and learning how to gauge the right plant for the right pot becomes second nature. Join us as we discover the steps to creating a successful and productive herb garden.

Almost anything that will hold soil can be used as a container for herbs. A clay pot, an old tin, a wooden crate, or even a tea pot can make good container. We will cover the basics of herb gardening; including proper soil, plant options, water and nutrient needs, container choices, and harvesting. Whether you’re planting herbs for culinary use, attractive foliage and blooms, or fragrance, there are herbs to satisfy everyone’s yen.

All materials included, be sure to bring something to carry your container home with. Experienced and novice gardeners welcomed!

All photographs ©Rob Proctor, Joe Coca, & Interweave Press.

Space is limited, RSVP required by June 14
Doors open at 6pm; Workshop starts at 6:30pm

Hort members $45; Non-members $70 (Materials included)
Register online or email info@thehort.org





Tropical Gardens of the Philippines
A Lecture with Lily Gamboa O’Boyle and Elizabeth V. Reyes
Tuesday, June 14, 2011


Offering a rare glimpse into some of the most beautiful tropical gardens in the world, Tropical Gardens of the Philippines presents spectacular contemporary gardens—large and small—situated in and around the Metropolitan Manila area and the nearby provinces of Laguna, Batangas and Tagaytay. Introducing a contemporary gardening style that has been evolving in the Philippines over the past decade, as well as more traditional formal styles, the book traces the development of garden design in all its forms. Designers new and old are showcased along with a number of talented home owners, many of whom are proficient gardeners themselves. Experimenting with both indigenous and introduced species, use of hardscapes such as local stones and pavers, bonsai, clipped shrubs and water features, some work along Oriental lines, others follow Western models. All are finding their own niches in the attempt to define a unique tropical gardening style. There is no one school of gardening in the Philippines, much as there is no one term to describe the Filipinos themselves; this book celebrates the many diverse aspects of this “new tropical garden design”.

Lily Gamboa O’Boyle is an accomplished home entertainer and avid gardener originally from the Philippines where she distinguished herself as an actress. Lily divides her time among her homes in Connecticut and Florida in the USA and Manila. She is the author of Philippine Hospitality, Pacific Crossings and In the Gardens of the Philippines.

Elizabeth Reyes is a travel, arts and feature writer for various Asian magazines and the author of many books on Philippine design and architecture, including her groundbreaking Filipino Style.

All photographs ©Luca Invernizzi Tettoni.

Doors open at 6pm; Talk starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $5; Non-members $15

Register online or email info@thehort.org





Succulent Container Workshop
Thursday, May 26, 2011


With their wonderful architectural shapes, array of colorful leaves, and minimal care, succulents are perfect, forgiving plants for containers. They can sit on your terrace or patio in the summer, come in for the winter and thrive almost anywhere in the world. Since garden space is at a premium in places like New York City, a sunny windowsill can be brought to life with an extravagant succulent garden. If you travel often and are not at home, succulents allow you to garden on your own terms. Because most succulents come from extreme environments, they are able to survive even the most neglectful of gardeners.

Every succulent is unique and has its own personality. Echeverias come in brilliant hues with fat, frilly foliage. Sedums are delicate, Senecios cascading, and Agaves edgy. Smaller succulents like Graptopetalums and Sempervivums resemble stars, roses, and daises. Join George Pisegna, our Director of Horticulture, as he walks you through the basics of designing and caring for succulents. There will be a brief lecture about succulent planting and care along with the basics of design, including how textures or colors contrast, using lines and repetition, scale and proportion, and pairing a plant with its container. Come and discover how a well-designed succulent container garden can be a three-dimensional work of art.

All materials included; please bring something to transport your finished container garden.

Space is limited, RSVP required by Tuesday, May 24
Doors open at 6pm; Workshop starts at 6:30pm

Hort members $85; Non-members $125

Register online or email info@thehort.org





Gertrude Jekyll and the Country House Garden
A Lecture by Judith B. Tankard
Tuesday, May 24, 2011


Gertrude Jekyll was one of the most important garden designers of the twentieth century. A prolific writer and a hugely influential plantswoman, her circle of friends included some of the most distinguished architects, horticulturists, artists, and writers of the time. Judith Tankard celebrates Jekyll’s gardens and her legendary theories on color, planting, and design, with a selection of her famous collaborations with Edwin Lutyens and other architects. Jekyll was renowned for her naturalistic plantings in a formal framework, which in turn inspired generations of garden designers, including Beatrix Farrand. Jekyll’s home and garden at Munstead Wood, seen for the first time in magnificent new photographs, remains her finest creation.

Judith B. Tankard is an art historian specializing in landscape history and the author of 8 illustrated books. Her books include The Gardens of Ellen Biddle Shipman, Gardens of the Arts and Crafts Movement, and Beatrix Farrand: Private Gardens, Public Landscapes. She also writes articles and book reviews for Hortus, Landscape Architecture, Country Life, and other publications and is currently publications editor of the Beatrix Farrand Society in Maine. Judith taught at the Landscape Institute of Harvard University for 20 years and in 2000 she was awarded a gold medal by the Massachusetts Horticultural Society for her work in preservation. Judith gardens in the Boston area and on Martha’s Vineyard, where she organized an Open Day for the Garden Conservancy in 2010.

Doors open at 6pm; Talk starts at 6:30pm
Hort Members $5; Non-members $15

Register online or email info@thehort.org






Wicked Bugs
A talk with Amy Stewart
Monday, May 23, 2011



In this darkly comical look at the sinister side of our relationship with the natural world, Stewart has tracked down over one hundred of our worst entomological foes-creatures that infest, infect, and generally wreak havoc on human affairs. From the world’s most painful hornet, to the flies that transmit deadly diseases, to millipedes that stop traffic, to the “bookworms” that devour libraries, to the Japanese beetles munching on your roses, Wicked Bugs delves into the extraordinary powers of six- and eight-legged creatures.

With wit, style, and exacting research, Stewart has uncovered the most terrifying and titillating stories of bugs gone wild. Intricate and strangely beautiful etchings and drawings by Briony Morrow-Cribbs capture diabolical bugs of all shapes and sizes in this mixture of history, science, murder, and intrigue that begins—but doesn’t end—in your own backyard.

Amy Stewart is the award-winning author of five books on the perils and pleasures of the natural world, including two New York Times bestsellers, Wicked Plants and Flower Confidential. Stewart is a highly sought-after public speaker, she has appeared on hundreds of national and regional radio and television programs, including CBS Sunday Morning, NPR's Morning Edition, and Good Morning America. She has written for the New York Times, the San Francisco Chronicle, and every national garden magazine, including Fine Gardening, where she is a contributing editor. Stewart lives in Eureka, California, with her husband Scott Brown. They own an antiquarian bookstore called Eureka Books and tend a flock of unruly hens in their backyard.

Doors open at 6pm; Talk starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $5; Non-members $15

Register online or email info@thehort.org




Architecture Safari: Brooklyn
Tour led by Landscape Architect Marcha Johnson
Saturday, April 30, 2011

Presented by the New York Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects

Lurking in the waters of public fountains, guarding doorways, peeping around cornice corners, running across walls, twining up columns, forming the handles of garden urns…there is a jungle of carved animals and plants inhabiting New York!  And each one has a story.  Join us on a one-hour walking tour as we hunt for fruiting flora and fierce fauna in plain view on buildings and in plazas.  For all ages.

Tour starts at 11:00am
(meet on the steps of the Brooklyn Public Library, at Eastern Parkway and Grand Army Plaza)
FREE; RSVP to Morgan@nycivic.org
or call 212-564-4441





The Gardens of Paris
A Lecture with CeCe Haydock
Wednesday, April 27, 2011



Paris gardens were originally inspired by the romantic styles found in Italy and England. Over the past two hundred years, designers have created a uniquely Parisian look to the gardens, as they have become a cultural way of life. Today, Paris boasts of more than 400 private and public gardens, each one appreciated for its distinct place in the fabric of the city.

The tour will begin with such well-known parks as Luxembourg, Tuileries and Bagatelle, smaller gardens such as Monceau, Rodin, and Carnavalet, and also a few surprises such as Promenade du Plantee, Hotel du Sully and Mosque du Paris.

In Paris, a park is almost never a mere plot of grass reserved for leisure, and a garden is rarely a random selection of flowers and plants. Parisians pride themselves in making their city's parks and gardens places of elegance, artistic detail, and symmetry-- even the romantic gardens have been carefully planned to imitate nature.

CeCe Haydock is a lecturer on historic gardens and a practicing landscape architect. In 2007, she researched Roman villas as a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy in Rome. She recently returned from a trip to France where she studied more than 25 large and small Parisian parks and gardens.

12 to 2pm
Hort/ASLA members FREE; non-members $15
Members RSVP to info@thehort.org
or 212-757-0915 (x100);
Non-members can purchase tickets online
or at the number above.








21st Century Trends in New York City Parks
A Panel Discussion
Wednesday, April 20, 2011


Join us for an illustrated panel discussion with ASLA award-winning firms on current trends bringing NYC parks into the 21st Century.  This event is part of Landscape Architecture Month at The Hort and is held in conjunction with the 2011 NY ASLA Awards Exhibition.

In response to increasingly environmentally conscious and sustainable design practices, the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation, in collaboration with Design Trust for Public Space, created a series of guidelines for the planning of NYC parks that meet needs of the 21st century urban environment.  According to the guidelines, parks must improve the ecological viability of the city while providing a better quality of urban life. In addition, they should ensure that NYC’s parks clean our air, absorb storm water, reduce the urban heat island effect, provide habitat, and address the challenges of climate change. 

This panel highlights five Award-winning landscape architecture and design projects featured in the exhibition.  Each panelist will give a brief presentation on their project, followed by a discussion about current and future trends in landscape architecture and urban park design. In addition to the High Performance Landscape Guidelines manual, projects include: the ongoing restoration of the Central Park Lake; the continued development of Fort Totten Park by Nancy Owens Studio; the master plan for Shoelace Park on the Bronx River Greenway by Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects; and the plan for Governors Island Park and Public Space by West 8 Urban Design and Landscape Architecture. 

Panelists include: Nette Compton, Senior Project Manager for Sustainability, NYC Department of Parks & Recreation; Kim Mathews, Principal, Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects; Christopher Nolan, Vice President of Planning, Design and Construction, Central Park Conservancy; Nancy Owens, Principal, Nancy Owens Studio; and Marc Ryan, Project Manager, West 8 Urban Design and Landscape Architecture.

Doors open at 6:00pm; Panel starts at 6:30pm
Hort & ASLA members $5; non-members $15
Register online or call 212-757-0915 (x100)
1.0 LA CES (HSW) credit available



Image credits (top to bottom): Governors Island Park, West 8 Urban Design and Landscape Architecture; View of Bioswale, Fort Totten North Park, Nancy Owens Studio, LLC; Cover of High Performance Landscape Guidelines: 21st Century Parks for NYC, Design Trust for Public Space and the NYC Department of Parks & Recreation; Stormwater Strategies, Shoelace Park, Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects.




The Restoration of the Central Park Lake
A Private Site Visit and Tour
Friday, April 15, 2011


Join us for a tour of the recently restored lake led by the Central Park Conservancy. At 20-acres, it is the largest of the naturalistic water bodies conceived by the Park’s designers, Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux. Envisioned as the heart of the Park, the lake was one of the first areas to be opened to the public, and played a significant role in establishing both the experience and meaning of Central Park.

One of the last features to be restored in the course of the Park’s three decade turnaround, the Central Park Lake has been returned to its former prominence.  The project included the restoration of inlets and coves along the lake, many of which had been completely silted in, the stabilization of the shoreline, and the restoration of historic architectural elements, including the reconstruction of Oak Bridge based on its original design. The project aimed to recapture the inherent qualities of the Lake that have been degraded or obscured over time, and improve the scenic quality of the landscape, in order to revive the ability of this quintessential Central Park landscape to provide visitors with a sense of wonder, pleasure, and a respite from city life.

This event is presented with the New York Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects in conjunction with our current exhibition.

Meet at 5:15 by the Bethesda Fountain
(Enter at 72nd)
Hort & ASLA members FREE; non-members $15
Members RSVP to info@thehort.org
or 212-757-0915 (x100);
Non-members can purchase tickets online
or at the number above.

1.0 LA CES (HSW) credit available






Trees in the Urban Landscape
A Lecture by William Bryant Logan
Thursday, April 14, 2011


New York City often proves to be a very stressful environment for ornamental plants, throwing constant challenges at professional horticulturists and amateur gardeners alike. Landscape architects and designers face the difficult task of carefully selecting plants that will withstand soil compaction, vandalism, drought, and salt exposure in addition to being able to thrive within our hardiness zone and seasonal weather fluctuations. Trees of any size, no matter how established, face these problems as much as any other ornamental plant.  In the urban landscape, trees provide visual and environmental relief in the midst of concrete high rises and asphalt, and it is our duty as city dwellers to learn to properly care for them. Join us for a lecture by Bill Logan on how to ensure that trees not only survive but thrive in the urban landscape.

Bill Logan is an award-winning natural history writer and environmental columnist. His book on gardening tools won the Best Book of the Year award from the Garden Writers Association of America. In 1992, Logan founded Urban Arborists to care for trees in New York City. Three years later, "Dirt: The Ecstatic Skin of the Earth," was published. Logan's most recent book, "Oak: The Frame of Civilization," published in 2008 by W.W. Norton.

Doors open at 6pm; Talk starts at 6:30pm
Hort & ASLA members $5; Non-members $15

Register online or call 212-757-0915 (x100)
1.0 LA CES (HSW) credit available
Post-certification for ISA Certified Arborist CEUs will be filed






Tablescape
A Private Viewing with the Designers
Tuesday, April 12, 2011



This year, the event previously known as Flowers & Design will reprise the spirit of The Hort's famous and historic New York Flower Show by offering a private viewing of the extravagant tablescape designs. Join us at 583 Park to meet some of New York City’s top designers and be inspired by their creative and unique floral designs.

See how the space is transformed into numerous elegant and dramatic dinner party settings. Mingle with the designers and experience a first-hand look at their work and the spectacular range of styles.

To learn more about the 2011 Designers, click here.

3:00-5:00pm
583 Park Ave (at 63rd Street)
Hort members FREE; Non-members $10










North American Rock Garden Society Meeting:
The Gardens I Remember:
What about them has influenced my gardening and my life

A Talk with Anne Raver
Monday, April 11, 2011


What makes one garden so memorable, while others fade from the mind almost as soon as you run home to see if the bluebells are up? After more than 25 years writing about gardens, first for Newsday, a daily on Long Island, then for the New York Times, as well as many other publications, Anne's answer is basically the same. For her, it comes down to the proverbial bones of the garden -- though those bones can be curving or straight -- and to the spirit of the place. She prefers gardens made by gardeners to those made by professionals for wealthy clients (which are often more pleasing to the eye, than to the soul). She remembers the gardens that reveal as much about the gardeners, as the rocks and soil of the site. These include Bill Noble and Jim Tatum in their rolling valley in Norwich, VT; Dan Hinkley and Robert Jones at Windcliff, overlooking the Puget Sound in Indianola, WA; Dennis and Cheryl Kamera on nearby Whidbey Island; and closer to home, Duncan and Julia Brine, who have created six acres of wild, painterly gardens in Pawling, NY. She also tips her gardener's cap to the hawthorns that Abbie Zabar pruned into a bower on her rooftop in Manhattan (and may they thrive once more!) and the hopvines that Ben Granger, a chef and beer-maker grows in his Brooklyn backyard.

Anne Raver has written about gardening and the environment for 25 years. As an award-winning columnist and feature writer for Newsday, in the 1980s, and then for the New York Times, she has explored the meaning of gardens from river farmers in the Amazon to the urban pioneers of New York City, who not only famously turned trash lots to gardens, but who are now farming -- on rooftops, in schoolyards and on actual acres in the city. She also tells the stories of the dogs, cats, bugs and tomatoes burgeoning in her own garden down in Maryland, where she battles stinkbugs with her partner, Rock Singewald. A graduate of Oberlin College and Johns Hopkins University, and a former Loeb Fellow at Harvard University, she is the author of Deep in the Green, published by Knopf in 1995, and still in print as a Vintage paperback.

Talk starts at 6pm
Hort/NARGS members FREE
For more information, please email ManhattanNARGS@verizon.net
Or visit www.nargs.org/manhattan







Architecture Safari: Manhattan
Tour led by former NYC Parks Commissioner Henry Stern
Sunday, April 10, 2011

Presented by the New York Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects

Lurking in the waters of public fountains, guarding doorways, peeping around cornice corners, running across walls, twining up columns, forming the handles of garden urns…there is a jungle of carved animals and plants inhabiting New York!  And each one has a story.  Join us on a one-hour walking tour as we hunt for fruiting flora and fierce fauna in plain view on buildings and in plazas.  For all ages.

Tour starts at 11:00am
(meet at 86th Street & Park Ave.)
FREE; RSVP to Morgan@nycivic.org
or call 212-564-4441







The Gardens at Bedell Cellars
A Lecture and Wine Tasting with Trent Preszler
Thursday, March 24, 2011



What began as the David’s family potato farm in 1640 was planted to vineyards in 1980 to become Bedell Cellars. The property was recently transformed into a living showcase of local flora during a four-year period of intense hardscape and landscape renovation. Bedell CEO Trent Preszler worked in conjunction with Edmund Hollander Design and local master gardener Anne Trimble to renovate and refresh the plantings around the property. The newly completed gardens celebrate many local, native plants, from coastal fruits, grasses, and culinary herbs to East End Long Island classics like boxwood and hydrangea. Mass plantings of Nepeta add dramatic flair to the property and are accented by towering, columnar European hornbeams lining the driveway, while an old-growth apple orchard surrounds the guest cottage. Italian red slate comprises most of the stone work on the property and, like the architecture of Bedell, the landscaping evokes a sense of place firmly rooted in the North Fork of Long Island, while also infusing sophisticated elements from other parts of the world, most notably Provence. Bedell Cellars has been a sustainably farmed, family-owned winery since 1980 and is considered one of the most prestigious wineries in the United States, having been called a “world class estate” by the New York Times and named one of the world’s “Top 10 Hottest Brands” by Wine Business Monthly.

Please join us as we welcome Trent Preszler for an evening celebrating both the fascinating history and exciting developments of Bedell Cellars. In addition to an illustrated lecture exploring the beautiful grounds of the winery, we will offer a tasting of the wines produced by Bedell.

Trent Preszler, Chief Executive Officerof Bedell Cellars, was raised on a cattle ranch in South Dakota and later earned a B.S. in Global Science Policy and Bioethics from Iowa State University, a Master’s Diploma in the Biodiversity of Taxonomy of Plants from Edinburgh University and the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (U.K.), and a M.S. in Agricultural Economics from Cornell University. He is also currently a Ph.D. Candidate in Horticulture at Cornell, where he is a frequent guest lecturer. Now at age 33, he is one of the youngest winery CEOs in the world and has led Bedell through its important brand, facility, and personnel transformations during Michael Lynne's ownership. An active scholar in addition to running a winery, Trent's writings have been published by Oxford University Press, the American Journal of Enology and Viticulture, and the Huffington Post. He is currently on the Board of Directors of WineAmerica and the New York Wine and Grape Foundation.

Doors open at 6pm; Lecture starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $25; non-members $40
Register online or email gpisegna@hsny.org









Monday, March 21, 2011
North American Rock Garden Society Meeting
Rocking in the Rockies
An adventure with Francisco Correa, Judith Dumont and Michael Riley



The magnificent Rocky Mountains of Colorado are familiar to hikers and nature enthusiasts far and wide. To attend a "meeting" in such a setting does not sound so exciting until one realizes that it is the Annual Meeting of the North American Rock Garden Society. Several members of our Manhattan Chapter of NARGS participated in this event last July and they are just now “coming down to earth” from the exhilarating mountain air, incredible nature found in those lofty habitats, and magnificent gardens of their fellow rock gardeners – not to forget the Denver Botanic Garden. You might wish to bring a canteen; trail mix will be served..

Judith Dumont exercises her passion in her Brooklyn garden; "back 40 acres", front container gardens, tree pits, community gardens and anyplace else she finds one square inch that might support vegetation. Francisco Correa and Michael Riley garden on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, on the rooftop and indoors under lights and on the walls and in tree pits; in alpine troughs and other containers growing tropicals, subtropicals, heirloom vegetables and anything that will survive on this "Big Rock" called New York City.

Talk starts at 6pm
Hort/NARGS members FREE
For more information, please email ManhattanNARGS@verizon.net
Or visit www.nargs.org/manhattan








Urban Agriculture Conference
Friday, March 18, 2011



The Horticultural Society of New York invites you to come explore the present state and future of agriculture and the way that we, as city residents, connect with our food and farmers. We are very excited to be joined by seven influential representatives from the field of agriculture. Each approaches food production from a different angle, but all share a love of farming and a passion for sustainably feeding our communities.

This is a very dynamic time for our nation’s farmers. More than ever, we, as a nation, are starting to ask questions about where our food comes from, how it’s grown, and what we can do to take more control over such an important part of our lives that, for years, has started to resemble an industry more than a livelihood.

We hope that you’ll join us to discuss the challenges facing organic farmers, food production at urban farms, community gardens, the new agrarian movement, and the obstacles facing all of those who grow our food. We look forward to your attendance at what promises to be an informative and inspiring conference.

Click here to see the conference schedule.
Click here to read about the panelists.

Hort members $20; Non-members $45
Breakfast and lunch included
Must register online by Wednesday, March 16, or email gpisegna@hsny.org


Breakfast provided by Stonyfield Organic.

Photo credits clockwise from top banner: 1. Mindfuleats.com; 2. Chad Harder and Sepp Jannotta; 3. Chris Stevens; 4. Susan Reimer






Growing a Garden City
A Lecture with Jeremy Smith
Wednesday, March 16, 2011



In January 2010, the news broke that one in four families experienced at least one day in 2009 when they were too short of money to buy the food they needed. That same week, unrelated researchers released data revealing that a third of Americans were not just overweight, but obese. This food disconnect is a conundrum that we as Americans need to address, but how?

In Growing a Garden City, Jeremy N. Smith tells the remarkable, true story of a city learning to feed itself. With striking color photographs and compelling personal narratives, Smith demonstrates how diverse residents of one city embraced the local food movement by establishing city gardens, food kitchens, co-op subscriptions, college internships, agriculture-based education, and farm-work therapy programs to transform a population as at risk as any in America into one that now stands as a model for community-supported agriculture.

The surprising, inspiring results prove that it’s possible to eat well locally even if you don’t live on a rural homestead or in an elite urban area, and that volunteer-powered farms and gardens, even in a harsh climate, can provide satisfying food to feed a diverse population.

Jeremy N. Smith is a Harvard College graduate and received an MFA in creative writing from the University of Montana. Between degrees, he received a Henry Russell Shaw Fellowship to travel and write in Western Europe. He is an award-winning writer and popular public speaker whose work on food and food systems has appeared in Gourmet, Saveur, the Christian Science Monitor, and the Chicago Tribune, among many other publications. Jeremy appears frequently on television and radio and social media, including NBC News, The Write Question, AlterNet, and Change.org. Jeremy lives and works in Missoula, Montana with his wife, the activist and organizer Crissie McMullan, and their infant daughter Rasa.

Doors open at 6pm; Talk starts promtly at 6:30
Hort members $10; non-members $20
Register online or email gpisegna@hsny.org








New York City Gardens
An Illustrated talk with Betsy Pinover Schiff
Monday, March 14, 2011



Leave the pavement behind and enjoy thirty of New York's most outstanding gardens in this illustrated presentation by photographer Betsy Pinover Schiff. Her new book, with text by Veronika Hofer, features gardens by important landscape architects whose designs she will discuss, including Ken Smith, Topher Delaney, Halsted Welles, Brian Sawyer and some very talented home owners. Sam Roberts of The New York Times writes: "Readers get rare, lush glimpses" of city gardens in this "ambrosial paean to public and private spaces." A book signing will follow.

Betsy Pinover Schiff, of New York City and Montauk, L.I., is a photographer of landscape architecture, gardens, and travel destinations. Having an extensive background in the arts, she brings to her work a strong sense of color and graphics which are signature elements of her style.

Doors open at 6pm; Talk starts at 6:30
Hort Members FREE; Non-members $15






Songbirds of New York City
A Lecture and Workshop with Glenn Phillips
Thursday, March 10, 2011



A songbird is classified as a passerine, or perching bird. This group contains some 4000 species, and is characterized by a vocal organ that has developed to produce a diverse and elaborate song. The incredible diversity and vocal nature of this group makes them an engaging subject to watch in their natural habitat. Despite its seemingly unnatural landscape, many songbirds are happy to call New York City home every year, passing through as part of their seasonal migration.

Join us as we welcome Glenn Phillips, Executive Director of the New York City Audubon Society, who will help us explore what it takes to make your home more bird-friendly by reducing hazards, such as glass and pesticide poisoning, and teach us how to make a garden, of whatever size, more appealing to bird visitors. New York City hosts millions of songbirds during migration, and it is up to us as city residents to learn how to be the consummate hosts to our avian guests.

Following an illustrated presentation, there will be a hands-on workshop where we will create suet pine cone feeders and eco-friendly bird nesting kits complete with nesting materials. These will not only help our feathered friends make it through the cold winter but will provide them with warm nesting material for the spring to come.

As the Executive Director of New York City Audubon, Glenn Phillips worked to establish the Prospect Park Audubon Center as the premier site in Brooklyn for environmental education since it's opening in 2002. Glenn worked at the Columbia University Center for Environmental Research and Conservation, running adult education programs in conservation biology. Following that, he also worked at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, where he helped develop the Everett Children's Adventure Garden, a hands-on outdoor museum within the Botanical Garden.

6:30pm
Hort members $20; non-members $35


Image credits: Top banner: Prothonotary warbler by Ardith Bondi; Top right: Tufted Titmouse by David Spelser







Gardens of the Hudson Valley
An Illustrated Lecture with Susan Lowry and Nancy Berner
Wednesday, March 9, 2011



The majesty of the Hudson River has captivated both artists and visitors for generations, and the gardens along its banks have a unique character. From the early gardens of riverfront estates like Clermont and Montgomery Place, with their sweeping lawns and spectacular views of the river and far-off mountains, to the Beaux Arts masterpiece Kykuit and the 1950s gardens at Manitoga, the historic gardens highlight the significant role of the Hudson Valley in the development of American landscape design. Many of the major figures worked here, including Andrew Jackson Downing, Frederick Law Olmsted, Beatrix Farrand, and Fletcher Steele, and their ideas continue to resonate in the 21st century. Included are a number of private, contemporary gardens that are informed by both the history and topography of the valley; the grand themes evoked in the larger historic properties are echoed in these smaller, more modest landscapes.

Susan Lowry and Nancy Berner wrote Gardens of the Hudson Valley, by Sue Daley and Steve Gross (photographers), which was published in October 2010, and are the authors of Garden Guide: New York City (revised edition published August 2010). They are longtime volunteers at the Conservatory Garden.

12 to 2pm
Hort members $10; non-members $15
For more information, email gpisegna@hsny.org


Photographs copyright 2010 Steve Gross and Susan Daly, All Rights Reserved.







Embroidered Ground: Revisiting the Garden
A Lecture by Page Dickey
Wednesday, March 2, 2011



In Embroidered Ground: Revisiting the Garden, the acclaimed author and garden designer Page Dickey writes of the pitfalls, challenges, successes, and myriad pleasures of the twenty-nine year-long process of creating her own remarkable garden, Duck Hill, in upstate New York. This winning book details the evolution of one especially loved and cared-for space: its failed schemes and realized dreams, and the wisdom gained in contending with an ever evolving work of art. The author shares her very personal views on what contributes to a garden’s success—structure, fragrance, the play of light and shadow, patterns and textures, multiseasonal plants. She writes of gardening with a husband, with wildlife, with dogs and chickens. And she grapples with how to adapt her garden—as we can adapt ours—to change in the years ahead.

Click here to read the recent New York Times article about Page Dickey's garden.

Page Dickey is the author of Gardens in the Spirit of Place, as well as the award-winning Breaking Ground: Portraits of Ten Garden Designers. Other books include Duck Hill Journal: A Year in a Country Garden, Inside Out: Relating Garden to House, Dogs in Their Gardens and Cats in Their Gardens. A contributor to numerous magazines over the years, she lectures across the country and is one of the founders of the Garden Conservancy’s Open Days program. She lives and gardens with her husband in the company of assorted dogs, cats, and chickens in North Salem, New York.

Lecture starts promptly at 6:30pm
Hort members $10; non-members $20

Top Image: Randy Harris for The New York Times







North American Rock Garden Society Meeting:
Little Daffs and their Habitats
A talk with Lola Horwitz
Monday, February 28, 2011


Little Daffs and their Habitats will focus on the many species narcissi that grow in southern Spain, parts of Portugal and the slopes of the Atlas Mountains in Morocco. Of course, other wonderful plants share that Mediterranean habitat and some of them will be discussed. The pictures were taken in the course of a two week Greentour of those three countries in late February and early March of 2010.

Lola Lloyd Horwitz is a charter member of the Manhattan Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society where she has served as its president and as co-program chair. She has also served on the board of NARGS. Her interest in plants started in childhood when her mother grew plants in a sun room in Illinois. Later, a cousin shared his obsession with dwarf conifers and somehow led her to the existence of the American Rock Garden Society (its former name). Now she is the happy owner of her own attached 'alpine house' in Brooklyn where, with luck, a few 'little daffs' grace the bench in the depth of winter. In other seasons, she maintains and designs gardens.

Talk starts at 6pm
Hort/NARGS members FREE
For more information, please email ManhattanNARGS@verizon.net
Or visit www.nargs.org/manhattan







Terrarium Workshop
Wednesday, February 23, 2011



Whether you’re a novice or a seasoned gardener, join us at The Hort and discover one of the simplest ways to garden. George Pisegna, our Director of Horticulture, will share his secrets on how to create a wonderful garden under glass. Terrariums come in many shapes and sizes, from simple wine glasses to elaborate Wardian cases. Since space is a luxury to most city-dwellers, a terrarium is a perfect way to bring your favorite plants into your home.

After a short lecture, George will help you create your own magical terrarium with simple step-by-step instructions on choosing your materials, designing, and
planting your garden under glass. We will provide everything you need to create your terrarium project. Be sure to bring something with you to carry your finished terrarium home.

6:30pm
Hort Members $80; non-members $100

Note: classes must be paid in full at the time of registration. Cancellations must be made within 5 business days of workshop for refund.







Wonders of the Winter Landscape
An Illustrated Lecture by Vincent A. Simeone
Thursday, February 10, 2011



While many gardeners retreat indoors during the drab months of winter, some gardeners prefer to think about the beauty that well-chosen trees and shrubs can bring to a winter landscape. Many deciduous and evergreen shrubs and trees are detailed in the book, with recommended cultivars highlighted. Showy flowers, berries, winter foliage, bark color and texture, and growth habits all contribute to make these stunning ornamentals the stars of the winter garden.

Although North America suffers through several dreary months of winter each year, this guide describes trees and shrubs that make the barren winter landscape a wonderland of texture and color. Simeone conveys the elegance of deciduous trees and shrubs with an extreme attention to detail—Persian parrotia offers twisted, sinuous branches and exfoliating bark; witch hazel presents distinctive yellow and orange strap like flowers; and beautyberry produces vivid purple berries the birds cannot resist. The book goes on to discuss the virtues of evergreens, both broadleaf and coniferous, and includes two useful appendices that cover evergreen care and deer-resistant trees and shrubs.

Vincent A. Simeone is a well-known horticulturist who teaches gardening classes at the New York Botanical Garden and the State University of New York at Farmingdale and has assisted in garden tours in Canada, England, France, Germany, New Zealand, and South Africa. He is the manager of Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park in Oyster Bay, New York.

Doors open at 6pm; Talk starts promptly at 6:30
Hort members $10; non-members $20


Photo credit: Arboretum Wespelaar







15th Annual Plant-O-Rama
Tuesday, January 25, 2011


The Hort is proud to be sponsoring the 15th Annual Plant-O-Rama, presented by Metro Hort Group &
Brooklyn Botanic Garden. This year's show features over 45 exhibitors representing the NYC metro region's specialty nurseries and wholesale growers, horticultural suppliers, public gardens and greening organizations. Come visit our table - we'll be there all day.

9am - 4pm at Brooklyn Botanic Garden
For more information, contact (718) 623-7227







North American Rock Garden Society Meeting:
Design in the Small Rock Garden: In Praise of Artifice
A talk with Steve Whitesell
Monday, January 24, 2011


This talk will describe a number of private and public rock gardens that display plants in architectural settings such as planted walls, raised beds, and arrangements of troughs that abandon any pretense at 'naturalistic' rock gardening. These gardens are easier to build, provide better growing conditions for difficult alpine and dryland plants, and are more easily integrated into the larger garden picture of an average residential garden than a rock garden that attempts to more closely mimic nature.

Steve Whitesell is a registered landscape architect in the states of New York and Connecticut and works for the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation. He has BFA and BLA degrees from the Rhode Island School of Design and a Master of Arts in Garden History and Landscape Studies from Bard College. He is active in several professional and amateur horticultural groups and has traveled widely in the US, Canada, and Europe visiting exceptional private and public gardens.

Talk starts at 6pm
Hort/NARGS members FREE
For more information, please email ManhattanNARGS@verizon.net
Or visit www.nargs.org/manhattan







Romantic Gardens:
Nature, Art, and Landscape Design

An Illustrated Presentation by Elizabeth Barlow Rogers
Wednesday, January 19, 2011



The Romantic Movement, its seeds planted in the seventeenth century, became the ascendant philosophical and aesthetic ethos of the nineteenth century. The opposite of Classicism, with its regard for order, rationality, rules, and balance, Romanticism gave primacy to the imagination, to the senses, to intuition and inspiration, putting a premium on the spectacular, the mysterious, the dramatic. Above all, its emphasis was faith in the self, in the individual. As a movement, Romanticism has been minutely examined in the genres of music, literature, and art. But in this comprehensive survey, we see its development in that most transient manifestation of human effort: the garden.

Romantic gardens were a source of sensory delight, moral instruction, spiritual insight, and artistic inspiration. Here nature stimulated reverie and sentiment. Rustic structures, inscribed monuments, sweeping vistas, and naturalistic lakes and cascades were elements in an ever-changing panorama. Nature, and by extension, gardens were expected to stir the imagination, to clear the mind, to relieve the soul of its burdens, to provide both solace and salvation.

Elizabeth Barlow Rogers is the president of the Foundation for Landscape Studies. A native of San Antonio, Texas, she earned a bachelor’s degree in art history from Wellesley College and a master’s degree in city planning from Yale University.

A resident of New York City since 1964, Rogers was the first person to hold the title of Central Park Administrator, a New York City Department of Parks & Recreation position created by Mayor Edward I. Koch in 1979. She was the founding president of the Central Park Conservancy, the public-private partnership created in 1980 to bring citizen support to the restoration and renewed management of Central Park. She served in both positions until 1996.

Subsequent to guiding Central Park’s restoration and instituting a new management structure during the Conservancy’s first fifteen years, Rogers resumed her career as teacher, lecturer, and writer on the subject of place. At the same time, she has maintained her commitment to the preservation of living landscapes through good design and sound management practices.

12 to 2:30pm
Hort/ASLA members FREE; non-members $15


Image credits: Clockwise from top: 1. Frederic Edwin Church, Scene on a Catskill Creek, 2. William Callow, The Garden at Versailles with Fishing Temple, 3. John Martin, View of the Temple Suryah and the Fountain of Maha Dao, 4. Samuel Palmer, Oak Tree and Beech







Contemporary Heirlooms
Preview Party & Exhibition Walkthrough

Thursday, December 9, 2010

Join us for an intimate reception with local hors d'oeuvres from Katchkie Farm and Great Performances and drinks from Hudson Real American Whiskeys. A talk and guided tour of the exhibition will be led by Ken Greene, co-founder of the Hudson Valley Seed Library.

5:00 to 6:30pm
Hort and Seed Library members $10;
Non-members $20 online, $25 at door
For more information please call 212-757-0915 x121





Back to the Garden:
Reclaiming Landscape Design in the Age of Green

A Lecture by Margie Ruddick
Thursday, December 2, 2010




The Hort is pleased to welcome internationally renowned landscape designer Margie Ruddick, who will talk about her path from "green" pioneer into the Age Of Green. She will talk about retrieving landscape architecture from the checklists and prescriptions of sustainability, to define a personal practice that integrates green design with the art of making landscapes. Linda Pollak, Margie's collaborator on Queens Plaza, will introduce the talk.

Using lush images from her twenty-year practice, from the Living Water Park in Chengdu, Sichuan, China, to Queens Plaza in New York City, Margie Ruddick explains the practices we have adopted that constitute "green" landscape design. But she goes much deeper than technical practices and methods, to illustrate that "sustainability" or "green design" includes thoughtful collaboration, community-building, and most importantly recognizing the importance of art, the art of making landscapes, in creating a more sustainable world.

Margie Ruddick has taught at Harvard’s GSD, Yale, The University of Pennsylvania, and Parsons School of Design. Her upcoming publication is titled, What Are We Doing Here, Anyway? Meaning in the Age of Green.

Linda Pollak, founding partner of Marpillero Pollak Architects, received her Master’s Degree in Architecture from Harvard, where she also studied Landscape Architecture. Since 2004, Linda has dedicated herself to full-time practice in New York City, participating in civic initiatives.

Doors open at 6pm; Talk starts at 6:30
Hort/ASLA/AIA Members $10; Non-members $25
For more information please call (212) 757-0915 x115







No Experience Necessary: Drawing in Graphite
A workshop with Carol E. Hamilton
Friday, November 19, 2010




Workshop is full

If you’ve always wanted to learn to draw this is the class for you! With tools as simple as pencil and paper, we will develop the building blocks of realistic drawing technique that are the gateway to all other media. The workshop will focus on training eye and hand, as we learn to take control of the pencil for shading, creating texture, mastering perspective, identifying and drawing the basic shapes, and employing classical light and shadow to bring your subject matter to life.

Carol E. Hamilton has paintings in the collections of the Hunt Institute of Botanical Documentation, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Florilegium and a number of private collections. Her work has been shown extensively in museums, galleries and botanical institutions. The watercolorist is published in Today’s Botanical Artists, by Marcus and Kyer (Schiffer, 2008). She is also the 2009 recipient of the "ASBA Award for Service to Botanical Art" for her 10 years of service to the Board. Hamilton has served as President of the ASBA, as well as the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators Greater NY Chapter.

Hamilton is one of the jurors for The 13th Annual International Juried Botanical Art Exhibition, currently on view at The Hort Gallery through November 24.

Morning Session: 10am to 1pm
Afternoon Session: 2 to 5pm
Course Fee (for both sessions):
Hort Members $100; Non-members $135
Click here to view a list of materials (PDF)






Last Look Juror's Walkthrough
Wednesday, November 10, 2010


Join ASBA Jurors Francesca Anderson, Carol E. Hamilton, Dick Rauh and Jessica Tcherepnine for a guided walkthrough of The 13th Annual International Juried Botanical Art Exhibition. Learn about the selection process from the jurors themselves, as they share insight into what makes for an award-winning botanical painting.

The exhibition will remain on view at The Hort through November 24, 2010.

1:00 - 2:30pm
FREE; ASBA & Hort Members only
Registration required; RSVP to Chris Murtha at
For more information, please email cmurtha@hsny.org





Annual Meeting Lecture
The Rockefeller Family Gardens: New York and Maine

With Special Guest Paula Deitz
Thursday, November 11, 2010


Paula Deitz has delighted readers for more than thirty years with her vivid descriptions of both famous and hidden landscapes. Collected for the first time, the essays in Of Gardens record her great adventure of continual discovery, not only of the artful beauty of individual gardens but also of the intellectual and historical threads that weave them into patterns of civilization, from the modest garden for family subsistence to major urban developments. Deitz's essays describe how people, over many centuries and in many lands, have expressed their originality by devoting themselves to cultivation and conservation.

During a visit to the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Garden in Seal Harbor, Maine, Deitz first came to appreciate the notion that landscape architecture can be as intricately conceived as any major structure and is, indeed, the means by which we redeem the natural environment through design.

n this lecture, Deitz will focus on the history of the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Garden, and other landscapes associated with the family. She will draw from several essays in Of Gardens, including "The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Garden: A Blend of Far Eastern and English Inspiration." A book signing will follow.

Paula Deitz is Editor of The Hudson Review. As a writer and cultural critic in the fields of art, architecture, design, and landscape design, she is a frequent contributor to The New York Times, The Architectural Review, and Gardens Illustrated.

Lecture starts promptly at 6:30
Hort members FREE; Non-members $15
For more information. please email gpisegna@hsny.org





Wild Urban Plants of the Northeast
Monday, November 8, 2010


See the city's weedy plants in a whole new light in this illustrated talk by Peter Del Tredici, a senior research scientist at the Arnold Arboretum and a lecturer at Harvard University's Graduate School of Design. Mr. Del Tredici offers a fresh perspective on our understanding of the natural world. As Michael Pollan says of the author's new field guide, "You will never look at an 'invasive species' the same way again." A book signing will follow.

Doors open at 6pm;
Lecture starts promptly at 6:30
Hort members FREE; Non-members $10
For more information please email library@hsny.org







Hort Book Club Meeting
Wednesday, November 3, 2010

"If all mankind were to disappear, the world would regenerate back to the rich state of equilibrium that existed ten thousand years ago. If insects were to vanish, the environment would collapse into chaos."

Who doesn't love a myrmecologist? Edward O. Wilson is a planetary treasure: champion of biodiversity, secular humanist, upbeat octogenarian. PBS calls him 'Lord of the Ants' and the 'Ant Whisperer' - see myrmecologist above. His encyclopedic work The Ants coauthored with Bert Holldobler won a Pulitzer Prize as did his book On Human Nature.

At the next meeting of The Hort Book Club, we're experimenting with our format. At least one of us is reading Anthill: A Novel, Wilson's foray into the fiction world. The rest of us are sampling the science straight, reading Creation, Journey to the Ants or The Future of Life.

Admittedly this sounds like a free-for-all. But if you've ever read anything by Wilson or always meant to, this could be fun.

6pm; Free and open to all
For more information please contact library@hsny.org







Painting Autumn Apples in Watercolor
A workshop with Karen Kluglein
Monday, October 18, 2010




October is apple picking time and the orchards are full of many varieties in a wondrous display of color. Besides being delicious to eat they can be a beautiful subject for botanical painting. The form of the apple and texture of a branch or leaves can be very interesting. Students will observe, compose, draw and paint in watercolor, working with volume, color, and texture. Apples, fresh from the orchard, will be provided as subjects.

Karen Kluglein graduated from The School of Visual Arts and worked as a commercial food illustrator. Her love of painting nature inspired her to pursue her talent as a botanical artist. Kluglein is currently represented by Susan Frei Nathan Fine Works on Paper, NY, and The River Gallery, Chattanooga, TN. Her work is in private collections throughout the country and she has received numerous awards for her botanical masterpieces. She currently lives and works in East Hampton, NY.

Two of Kluglein’s paintings are featured in The 13th Annual International Juried Botanical Art Exhibition, currently on view at The Hort Gallery through November 24.

Morning Session: 10am to 1pm
Afternoon Session: 2 to 5pm
Course Fee (for both sessions): Hort Members $100; Non-members $135
Click here to view a list of materials (PDF)





Edith Wharton and the Villas of Rome
An Illustrated Presentation by Constance Haydock
Thursday, October 14, 2010


Edith Wharton’s prolific career as a fiction writer is well-known. But her unusual ability both to write and to observe puts her at the forefront of Italian garden critics as well; her book Italian Villas and their Gardens remains today a scholarly resource on the subject.

Eight Roman villas described by Wharton in her influential book will be explored, as well as the influence of the villas on Wharton's own houses and her novels. Bring your lunch and join us for an insightful, informative session presented by landscape architect and historian, Constance Haydock.


12pm
Hort/ASLA members FREE; non-members $10
For more information please contact library@hsny.org






The Complete Mushroom Hunter
A lecture & workshop with Gary Lincoff
Tuesday, October 12, 2010



Gathering edible wild food is a wonderful way to forge a connection to the earth. Mushrooms are the ultimate local food source; they grow literally everywhere, from Central Park to your own backyard. The Complete Mushroom Hunter: An Illustrated Guide to Finding, Harvesting, and Enjoying Wild Mushrooms invites readers to connect with a hobby that will enrich their understanding of the natural world and build an appreciation for an ancient, critically relevant, and useful body of knowledge. Here, amateur mycologists and mushroom enthusiasts will find a source and guidebook for their passion. Mushroom guru Gary Lincoff escorts the reader from the mushroom's earliest culinary awakening, through getting started and equipped for mushroom forays, to preparing and serving the fruits of the foray, wherever you live. This is the only mushrooming book that treats you to the not-so "underground" hobby of mushroom hunting and gathering.

Gary will be presenting an illustrated lecture on his new book and leading a workshop with a hands-on demonstration of how to create your own mushroom spore print. All supplies will be included. (Sample print below.)

Gary Lincoff is the author, co-author or editor of several books and articles on mushrooms, including The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Mushrooms. He teaches courses on mushroom identification and use at the New York Botanical garden. He has led mushroom study trips and forays to 30 countries across Asia, Africa, Europe and South, Central, and North America. Lincoff co founded and helped organize the Telluride Mushroom Festival for 25 years (1980-2004), and still participates as its principal speaker. Gary Lincoff is also a featured “myco visionary” in the award-winning documentary Know Your Mushrooms, by Ron Mann.

Doors open at 6pm; Lecture starts at 6:30pm
Space is limited, RSVP required
Hort members $10; non-members $25
For more information, please call (212) 757-0915 x115








Private Gardens of Connecticut
Tuesday, October 5, 2010



Oscar and Annette de la Renta, Bunny Williams, Anne Bass, Agnes Gund, and Richard and Sandra Bergmann and more!

Discover some of the finest private gardens in Connecticut with noted writer Jane Garmey. Her new book showcases stunning photographs by John M. Hall. Ms. Garmey, who gardens in Connecticut herself, is an astute guide with a keen eye for distinctive gardens. Her illustrated presentation beautifully captures the essence of her admittedly idiosyncratic selections as well as the gardeners themselves, visionaries all. A book signing will follow.

Doors open at 6pm;
Talk starts promptly at 6:30pm
Hort members FREE; non-members $20
For more information, please email library@hsny.org




New Green City Fair
Wednesday, September 29, 2010

GrowNYC presents NEW GREEN CITY welcoming more than 100,000 visitors to New York City's largest annual green event in Union Square Park. Following the success of Green Brooklyn...Green City in September of 2009, this year's family-friendly event showcases government agencies, non-profits, entrepreneurs and community & corporate partners at the forefront of environmental stewardship, education and awareness.

Come visit The Hort at Union Square during your lunch break or after work. We will be recruiting volunteers for community garden projects, hosting a craft table where families can create their own herbal tea concoctions, and offering a wide selection of literature at our library book sale.

10am - 6pm
Union Square Park, South Plaza
For more information, please call (212) 757-0915 x100,
or email sbush@hsny.org.





Botanic Watercolor Explorations
A workshop with Albert Massimi
Monday, September 20, 2010




Fall flowers and watercolor - the perfect combination! Learn how to capture the beauty of nature and improve your painting skills. We will focus on using warm and cool colors to your advantage, adding dimension to a work of art, designing with a focus in mind and creating a balanced composition. Whether you are a beginner or have been painting for some time, the goal is to move your art to another level.

Albert Massimi is President of the Brooklyn Watercolor Society. While in the Peace Corps in Korea, he studied brush and ink with a Korean master. Upon completing his graduate degree from Columbia University, he began painting at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden where he has been teaching botanic watercolor classes for the past several years. His work has been exhibited throughout the metropolitan area. You can view his work on his website, albertleemassimi.com.

Morning Session: 10am to 1pm
Afternoon Session: 2 to 5pm
Course Fee (for both sessions): Hort Members $100; Non-members $135
For more information, please call (212) 757-0915 x121
Click here to view a list of materials (PDF)





Tranquility by Design: Creating a Serenity Garden
A Lecture with Jan Johnsen
Thursday, September 16, 2010




"There is life in a stone, a plant, a tree and even water. When we are in a serene garden we connect to an 'aliveness' that resides in these living forms..."
-Jan Johnsen

We are pleased to welcome award winning landscape designer and author, Jan Johnsen as she reveals little known design secrets that can be applied to any outdoor space, large or small. Find out why a garden on the north side of a house is best suited for a viewing garden and why east is considered 'the most auspicious direction'. Learn what the 'moth theory' is and how to use it for the best outdoor lighting layout! Enjoy a lively discussion about geomagnetics and determining the 'power spot' in a landscape. And discover how the colors in a garden can arouse or calm and which plants are best for a serene outdoor space...Look at her blog for more about this.

Jan Johnsen has been in the professional landscape design and planning professions for over 35 years. She has worked in landscape architecture offices in Japan, Kenya, Hawaii, Vermont and New York. Her firm, Johnsen Landscapes & Pools designs and installs large scale projects in the Northeast. She teaches at Columbia University and the New York Botanical Garden. She is currently writing a book about her unique approach to landscape design.

Doors open at 6pm; Lecture starts at 6:30pm
Hort members $5; non-members $15
For more information, please call (212) 757-0915 x115








Hort Book Club Meeting
Tuesday, September 14, 2010

The Hort Library Book Club meets to discuss
"Oak: Frame of Civilization" by William Bryant Logan. The book thoroughly explores the many contributions the tree has made to the flourishing of western civilization in lively, insightful prose that is a pleasure to read.

Join us as we resume our monthly discussions of some of the best books on gardening, the environment, landscape design, natural history and plant hunting. We welcome your participation!

Meet Bill Logan at the Hort for the screening of DIRT!

Meeting begins at 6pm
For more information please email library@hsny.org








Gardens of Lower Manhattan
A Tour with Nancy Berner & Susan Lowry
Wednesday, September 8, 2010

Explore the lesser known public gardens of Lower Manhattan with "Garden Guide: New York City" experts Nancy Berner and Susan Lowry, who will reveal the wonders of special places like Hanover Square Garden, the Elevated Acre at 55 Water St., and the Gardens at the Battery in this farewell to summer tour.

Please note: The first 5 registrants for this tour will receive a free copy of the revised edition of
Garden Guide New York City.

Tour begins at 6pm;
The British Garden at Hanover Square
Hort members $10; non-members $20
For more information, please email library@hsny.org







Global Change and its Effect on Native Pollinators
A Lecture with Ignasi Bartomeus
Thursday, August 12, 2010



Most plants depend on insect pollination for reproduction. As pollinators, bees engage in a symbiotic relationship with plants. They depend on nectar to survive while they are crucial for a plant’s pollination. This exchange between more than 20,000 bee species and plants is being affected, putting our bees and the environment as a whole at risk. Surprisingly, despite its ecological and economical importance, we know very few things about most bee species. We invite you to learn about the lives of bees that are natives to the New York area and exactly how human impacts are threatening them.

Ignasi Bartomeus completed his PhD dissertation in 2008 at Barcelona Autonomous University studying the integration and impact of invasive plant species on native plant-pollinator communities. He now works as a PostDoctoral Researcher at Winfree lab (Rutgers University) studying how different drivers of global change (land use, climate, pesticides) are affecting native pollinator communities.



6:30pm
Hort members $5; non-members $15
For more information call (212) 757-0915 x115











Hort Book Club Meeting
Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Book club member Kaitilin Griffin has offered to host our group at her digs in Central Park on August 10 at 6 pm. Kaitilin is the librarian for the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. In addition to her research responsibilities there, she maintains the container plantings on the rooftop garden at The Arsenal.

Join us for a delightful summer evening out-of-doors (weather permitting, that is!). We'll have fun meeting new members, catching up with one another, and putting together a great reading list for the fall and winter. Bring your good ideas, your bookish selves,
and let's have a drink to summer's passing.

Free and open to all. Pre-registration is required as space is limited.

5th Avenue at 64th St., 6pm
For more information, please email library@hsny.org





Family Day at the Noguchi Museum
Saturday, July 24, 2010



Please join us at the Noguchi Museum as we co-host this year’s annual Summer Family Day. The event will highlight the beautiful and serene sculpture garden designed by Isamu Noguchi. Families are invited to explore and discover the garden and Museum galleries. The Hort will create three scale model gardens based on eastern and western design. The workshop encourages families to make individual sculptures to scale, while they consider design and placement within a space. Their sculptures will then be installed in the model garden of their choice and photographed.

The event will also feature live performances at
12:30 and 1:30pm by Jukebox Radio.

For further information, please email education@noguchi.org or call (718)204-7088 x203.
Admission is free for families with children between the ages of 2 and 12.




Change: The Passage of Time in the Garden
A Lecture with Sydney Eddison
Thursday, July 22, 2010



Change in a garden can be gradual as in the maturation of woody plants, like rhododendrons, or it can be sudden as in the felling of a large oak by lightning. But like it or not, gardens change from hour to hour, day to day, season to season, from one year to another, over a period of many years. Although this process is ongoing and inevitable, change is one of the least talked about aspects of gardening and one of the most fascinating.

For gardeners, time is the fourth dimension. How we respond to changes that occur due to the passage of time depends on our temperaments and on our gardening styles, but respond we must. Plants wax and wane. Some are long-lived; some are not. The decisions we make as we go along are what gives each garden its special character.

Join us as author Sydney Eddison presents an illustrated lecture and reading from her seventh and most recent book, Gardening for a Lifetime: How to Garden Wiser as you Grow Older.

Sydney Eddison writes with the joy, enthusiasm, and experience of a life-long gardener. She has written seven books on gardening including The Gardener's Palette: Creating Color in the Garden and The Gardener’s Color Wheel: A Guide to Using Color in the Garden. For her work, she received the Connecticut Horticultural Society’s Gustav A. L. Melquist Award in 2002; the New England Wild Flower Society Kathryn S. Taylor Award in 2005, The Federated Garden Clubs of Connecticut’s Bronze Medal in 2006, and in 2010 the National Garden Clubs, Inc. Award of Excellence. A former scene designer and teacher of drama, Ms. Eddison writes for Fine Gardening and other publications and is a popular lecturer.

6-7:30pm
Hort members $10; non-members $20
For more information, please call
(212) 757-0915 x115

Photographs were taken at Eddison's garden in Connecticut






The Visionary Reloaded:
New Scales of Operation in the Age of Information

Wednesday, June 23, 2010



A book launch and panel discussion featuring:

Amale Andraos & Dan Wood, WORK Architecture Co.
Fritz Haeg, Artist, Edible Estates
Adam Michaels, Project Projects & Inventory Books
Susan Gregory Thomas, author of Buy, Buy Baby
James Wines, SITE
Moderated by Jeff Gordinier, Details Magazine

In celebration of the launch of two books, WORKac’s Above the Pavement—the Farm!: Architecture and Agriculture at PF1, and the expanded second edition of Fritz Haeg’s Edible Estates: Attack on the Front Lawn please join us for a discussion focusing on how a new generation of visionaries utilizes media, design and activism to promote radical “green” change.

The evening will be moderated by Jeff Gordinier,
author of X Saves the World.

Doors open at 6pm; Event begins 6:30pm
Book signing and reception to follow


Admission $10; Students $5
Free for Hort & ASLA members
Admission & copy of Above the Pavement-the Farm! $20
For more information call (212) 757-0915 x100






Vegetable Container Gardening
with George Pisegna
Tuesday, June 22, 2010



Please note workshop date has been moved from June 14 to June 22

Not everyone has the room for a big edible garden, but even if you're limited to a lone container, you can still enjoy a summer's worth of homegrown produce. A windowsill, patio, balcony or doorstep can provide sufficient space for a productive container garden. Fruits, vegetables, and herbs provide wonderful aroma
and taste, and many varieties perform well in
containers. What's more, vegetables herbs, flowers, and other plants grow well together, as companion plants.

Container gardening is an easy and low-maintenance way to satisfy that garden urge. A dull patio area can be brightened by the addition of baskets with cascading tomatoes or a colorful herb mix. Planter boxes with trellises filled with beans and peas can be used to create a cool shady place on an apartment balcony. Container gardening presents opportunities for many innovative ideas.

Let HSNY's own George Pisegna teach you the basics of container gardening including soil mixes, plant and container choices, fertilizing and general plant care.
There will be a brief lecture followed by a demonstration
of how to plant a container garden.

6 - 8pm
Hort Members $50; non-members $65
For more information call (212) 757-0915 x115









Celebrating Forgotten Treasures:
The Use of Uncommon Roses in Today's Landscape

with Sarah Owens
Thursday, June 17, 2010







The rose has inspired artists, writers, and composers for centuries. Gardeners have been cultivating roses to perform in specific ways and possess desired traits for almost as long. Whether you’re a novice gardener wanting to know the basics of roses or a seasoned horticulturalist looking for tips on improving your blooms let Sarah Owens, curator of BBG's Cranford Rose Garden, offer her expert advice on how to include and care for roses in your garden.

Sarah will discuss the use of old roses and species roses with emphasis not just on flower but also fall color, bark, and hip display. Various landscaping issues and situations will be covered such as shade areas, prostrate roses for embankments, creating hedges, using specimens for interest, pergolas and trellises, fragrant roses for the landscape and companion plantings.

Sarah Owens is the curator of the historic Cranford Rose Garden and the Rose Arc Pool at Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Prior to joining BBG, she was head gardener at the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum. At the Battery Park Conservancy garden she worked to improve the garden’s aesthetics according to Piet Oudolf’s design. Owens also helped design and install the Native Plant Meadow and Edible Garden there. In addition, Owens is a ceramic artist, having designed sculpture and functional pottery for national retail and wholesale accounts, galleries, and exhibitions.

Doors open at 6pm
Lecture starts promptly at 6:30pm
Hort Members $15; Non-members $25
For more information call (212) 757-0915 x115


















Drawing and Painting Roses
A Botanical Illustration Workshop with Maria Cecilia Freeman
Monday, June 14, 2010




Roses are an alluring but challenging subject for any artist. In conjunction with her exhibition, Rose Studies, the artist Maria Cecilia Freeman will be giving a 2-session full day workshop on the botanical illustration of roses. The workshop will start with an introduction to rose botany and techniques for drawing these complex, delicate flowers. We will observe and draw from live plants (to be provided), moving from preliminary sketches to an edited drawing on watercolor paper. We will note color patterns, discuss color mixing, and practice some techniques of watercolor brushwork useful for painting rose petals and leaves. There will be ample time for individual attention while you develop your own drawings and begin painting. All levels
welcome—suitable for beginners as well as experienced
artists.

Maria Cecilia Freeman is a botanical artist based in Santa Cruz, California. Her work includes scientific illustration and botanically accurate fine art, often combining the two. She likes to create art that will serve the goals of education and conservation, with a particular interest in documenting rose species and heritage roses, and in portraying native plant species with a view to their preservation. Her work is included in the American Society of Botanical Artists’ exhibition Losing Paradise? Endangered Plants Here and Around the World, currently on display at the New York Botanical Garden through July 25. She is a member of the American Society of Botanical Artists, serving on the board of the Northern California SBA, and the Guild
of Natural Science Illustrators. She is also a member of
the California Native Plant Society, the American Rose
Society and Heritage Rose Foundation.

Morning Session: 10am to 1pm
Afternoon Session: 2 to 5pm
Course Fee (for both sessions): Hort Members $140; Non-members $165
For more information call (212) 757-0915 x100
Click here to view a list of materials (PDF)





The Gardens of Florence
An illustrated tour and book signing with author Katie Campbell
Thursday, June 10, 2010


Not going to Florence this summer? Join us for an illustrated tour Paradise of Exiles: The Anglo-American Gardens of Florence by British journalist Katie Campbell. The crumbling, abandoned villas above Florence proved irresistible to an eccentric colony of late 19th century expatriates. Campbell's book features 20 of these characters and the unusual gardens they created. Book signing to follow.




Doors open at 6pm; lecture begins at 6:30pm
Hort Members $10; Non-members $10
For more information call (212) 757-0915 x100






The Hort Library Book Club discusses
A Reunion of Trees

by Stephen A. Spongberg
Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Dear Reader:
We hope you can join us in the library for our next session. We are reading "A reunion of trees :the discovery of exotic plants and their introduction into North America and European landscapes" by Stephen A. Spongberg. It's a fascinating story.

Free and open to the public; bring a friend!
6pm at The Hort Library
For more information please email library@hsny.org







Word for Word Series: Green Acres, Green Gardens
A Panel Discussion in Bryant Park
Wednesday, June 2, 2010




Hosted by Maureen Hackett, Director of Horticulture, Bryant Park Corporation

Whether you have an atrium, yard, terrace, or a plant, join us for useful gardening tips by Bryant Park's own Maureen Hackett, and a host of writers and specialists in the field, including George Pisegna, HSNY Director of Horticulture and Peter Kukielski, Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden Curator, New York Botanical Garden and Author of Sustainable Rose Garden: Exploring 21st Century Environmental Rose Gardening

At Bryant Park Reading Room
12:30 — 1:45 pm
Click here for more information.











Overlooked Assets: Sustainable Urban Yards
Friday, May 14, 2010





Do you live in a building that has a front, side or back area that is concrete, neglected or just plain unsightly? Join us in discovering how to convert your outdoor space into a sustainable oasis.

This day-long seminar featuring noted landscape and environmental professionals will inform and inspire you to reclaim overlooked City "yards" hidden behind rowhouses and apartment buildings by demonstrating how recycled materials, native endangered species and permeable surfaces can be used to maximize the environmental benefits of these overlooked spaces while beautifying and improving quality of life for all who breathe our city's air and drink its water.

Moderated by George Pisegna, HSNY Director of Horticulture

Speakers include:
Ken Smith, Ken Smith Landscape Architects
Mariellé Anzelone, DROSERA
Jennifer Bolstad, Local Office Landscape Architecture
Rebecca Cole, Rebecca Cole GROWs
Tricia Martin, WE Design
Evan Mason, Sustainable Yards
Tatiana Morin, NYC Soil and Water Conservation District
Steven Tupu, Terrain NYC

Sponsored by: The Horticultural Society of New York, The NY Chapter of The American Society of Landscape Architects, and Sustainable Yards

10am - 3:45pm, lunch provided
$35 Hort/ASLA members; $50 non-members
LACES credits (2.5) available for an additional:
$25 ASLA members; $45 non-members



Click here to view seminar schedule (PDF)






The Coastal Flowers at Big Sur
with Dodo Loechle
Thursday, May 13, 2010




Join us for an illustrated presentation on the magnificent flora of the Pacific Coast. Dodo Loechle has just returned from a month long trek to Big Sur to witness the explosion of spring flowers following this year’s phenomenal winter rains.

When you think of Big Sur, thoughts of sea-swept cliffs and expansive ocean views come to mind. What many do not experience are the exceptional biodiversity of the coastal plant communities, like the wildflower filled prairie, yucca-studded chaparral, and the oak woodlands and old-growth redwood forests.

With stunning photographs, Dodo will take us on a journey through one of America’s most beautiful coast along with a wide and varied ecosystem of unique plants.

Dodo Loechle is a certified horticulturist with extensive experience in chemical free gardening, concentrating on container and rooftops gardens. She has worked for various botanic gardens, including Kirstenbosch in Cape Town, Africa, where she worked exclusively with native cape flora. Specializing in plant identification, Dodo has logged countless hours as a tour guide along with putting her talents to use as an instructor at the NYBG and the BBG.

Doors open at 6pm
Lecture starts promptly at 6:30pm
Hort Members $15; Non-members $25
For more information call (212) 757-0915 x100